Current Black holes News and Events

Current Black holes News and Events, Black holes News Articles.
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Earth faster, closer to black hole in new map of galaxy
Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is critical. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA. (2020-11-30)

Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple, scientists say
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments - home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract. (2020-11-30)

Covid-19 shutdowns disproportionately affected low-income black households
Princeton University researchers now report that low-income Black households experienced greater job loss, more food and medicine insecurity, and higher indebtedness in the early months of #COVID19 compared to white or Latinx low-income households. (2020-11-30)

Oxford University podcast returns with season on the History of Pandemics
The University of Oxford's CASE Gold Award winning podcast, Futuremakers, will return for its third season at the end of October. (2020-11-27)

Puzzling 'cold quasar' forming new stars in spite of active galactic nucleus
Using NASA's SOFIA telescope, University of Kansas researchers have found CQ 4479, a galaxy which never had been closely studied before, to be generating new stars in spite of a luminous AGN at the galaxy's center. (2020-11-27)

Black, Hispanic adolescents significantly more likely to die by police intervention than whites
A recent study evaluating the use of force by police against children found that Black and Hispanic adolescents are significantly more likely to die from shootings related to police intervention compared to non-Hispanic white adolescents. The findings, led by Children's National Hospital researchers and reported online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics, mirror similar racial and ethnic disparities in adults and highlight the need for interventions and policies to mitigate these tragedies. (2020-11-24)

Closing the racial disparity gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest
In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences. (2020-11-24)

Scientists make sound-waves from a quantum vacuum at the Black Hole laboratory
Researchers have developed a new theory for observing a quantum vacuum that could lead to new insights into the behaviour of black holes. (2020-11-23)

From lab to industry? Ideally ordered porous titania films, made at scale
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have realized high-throughput production of thin, ordered through-hole membranes of titanium dioxide. Titania layers were grown using anodization on mask-etched titanium before being crystallized. Applying a second anodization, they converted part of the layer back to an amorphous state. The amorphous portion was then selectively dissolved to free the film while leaving the template intact. This paves the way for industrial production of ordered titania membranes for photonics. (2020-11-21)

NRL researchers catch supermassive black holes launching newborn radio jets
NRL researchers led a team of scientists who discovered some of the youngest known radio jets launched by growing supermassive black holes. (2020-11-20)

Commentary: Want to understand health disparities? Get your antiracist goggles on
How do we shrink persistent racial health disparities, especially among children? Dell Medical School's Elizabeth Matsui says it starts by applying an antiracist blueprint to guide the way we fund, evaluate and disseminate research. (2020-11-19)

Study of hope and optimism: New paper examines research in emerging fields
A new paper published by the John Templeton Foundation explores the latest scientific and philosophical research on the related but distinct virtues of hope and optimism. The 45-page white paper, written by Michael Milona, a philosophy professor at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, examines findings on the benefits and risks involved in both hope and optimism. It examines projects by more than 29 researchers worldwide on topics related to the effects of hope and optimism in education, faith, healthcare, politics, and more. (2020-11-19)

VLA sky survey reveals newborn jets in distant galaxies
Comparing data from VLA sky surveys made some two decades apart revealed that the black hole-powered 'engines' at the cores of some distant galaxies have launched new, superfast jets of material during the interval between the surveys. (2020-11-19)

Astronomers' success: seven new cosmic masers
The astronomers from Toru?, Poland have successfully completed the survey of the Milky Way plane. They searched for gas clouds, where there was a maser reinforcement of the OH molecule. They saw seven new sources - each of them brings scientists closer to the process by which massive stars are born. - It is like listening to the buzzing of a mosquito during a loud concert - backstage observations are recapitulated by Prof. Anna Bartkiewicz. (2020-11-18)

Racial attitudes in a community affect COVID-19 numbers
Implicit racial attitudes within a community can effectively explain racial disparities seen in rates of COVID-19 in the United States, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by George Cunningham and Lisa Wigfall of Texas A&M University, USA. (2020-11-18)

Ethnic minorities face rising disparity in homicide risk across England and Wales
Calculations now familiar from coronavirus coverage - cases per 100,000 people - applied to ethnicity and homicide victimisation in the UK for the first time. So far this century, Black Britons have been over five and a half times more likely to become murder victims than White British people. Researchers call on ONS and police forces to calculate and present more 'meaningful' crime data to aid prevention and public understanding. (2020-11-17)

Study finds some sport fish are caught repeatedly - which may throw off population count
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries. (2020-11-17)

Blacks, Hispanics comprised more than half of all inpatient deaths from COVID-19
More than half of all in-hospital deaths due to COVID-19 during the first six months of 2020 were among Black and Hispanic patients, according to a new study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Duke University. (2020-11-17)

Retinas: New potential clues in diagnosing, treating Alzheimer's
A study led by the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery has identified certain regions in the retina - the lining found in the back of the eye - that are more affected by Alzheimer's disease than other areas. The findings may help physicians predict changes in the brain as well as cognitive deterioration, even for patients experiencing the earliest signs of mild impairment. (2020-11-17)

Former piece of Pacific Ocean floor imaged deep beneath China
In a study that gives new meaning to the term ''rock bottom,'' seismic researchers have discovered the underside of a rocky slab of Earth's lithosphere that has been pulled more than 400 miles beneath northeastern China by the process of tectonic subduction. (2020-11-16)

Low levels of choline in pregnant Black American women associated with higher levels of stress
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that many pregnant Black Americans have low levels of choline, an essential nutrient that aids in prenatal brain development. Stress caused by institutional racism may play a role. (2020-11-16)

Nearly one in five parents of food-allergic children are bullied
A new study being presented at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting shows that nearly one in five parents of food-allergic kids are the target of bullying by a multitude of sources. (2020-11-13)

Food allergies take a greater emotional toll on Asian families
A new study being presented at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting reveals the impact on food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for Asian patients and their parents is significantly higher than for other races. (2020-11-13)

Black and Hispanic children in the US have more severe eczema than white children
A presentation at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting reveals the disparities that exist for Black and Hispanic children when it comes to Atopic Dermatitis (AD), commonly known as eczema. (2020-11-13)

Handles and holes in abstract spaces: how a material conducts electricity better
A new theory has succeeded in establishing a new relationship between the presence or absence of 'handles' in the space of the arrangements of atoms and molecules that make up a material, and the propensity of the latter to conduct electricity. The insulating materials 'equipped with handles' can conduct electricity as well as metals, while retaining typical properties of insulators, such as transparency. (2020-11-13)

Study of infants finds that sleep differences by race, income emerge early
A new study led in part by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital takes a look at 24-hour sleep-wake cycles for infants across racial/ethnic and socioeconomic categories. The team found several distinct differences in sleep-wake patterns, largely explained by discrepancies in socioeconomic status. (2020-11-13)

People of Black and Asian ethnicity up to twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 as those of White ethnicity
People of Black ethnicity are twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 compared to those of White ethnicity. People from Asian backgrounds are 1.5 times more likely to become infected with the virus compared to White individuals. Those of Asian ethnicities may be at higher risk of admission to an intensive therapy unit (ITU) and death. (2020-11-12)

Sociologists dispel the 'bad apple' excuse for racialized policing
According to a study by University of Miami sociologists published in the American Sociological Association's Contexts magazine, almost one of five police officers exhibit high levels of implicit, or unconscious, pro-white/anti-Black bias, and roughly one of eight officers exhibit high levels of explicit, or conscious, pro-white bias. (2020-11-11)

Dark matter from the depths of the universe
Cataclysmic astrophysical events such as black hole mergers could release energy in unexpected forms. Exotic low-mass fields (ELFs), for example, could propagate through space and cause feeble signals detectable with quantum sensor networks such as the atomic clocks of the GPS network or the magnetometers of the GNOME network. These results are particularly interesting in the context of the search for dark matter, as low-mass fields are regarded as promising candidates for this exotic form of matter. (2020-11-11)

Multiracial congregations in US have nearly tripled, Baylor University study finds
Racially diverse congregations have more than tripled in the United States over the past 20 years, and the percentage of all-white congregations has declined, according to a study by a Baylor University sociologist and two colleagues. (2020-11-11)

Atmospheric rivers help create massive holes in Antarctic sea ice
Warm, moist rivers of air in Antarctica play a key role in creating massive holes in sea ice in the Weddell Sea and may influence ocean conditions around the vast continent as well as climate change, according to Rutgers co-authored research. (2020-11-11)

Losing the American Dream
As many Americans struggle to pay their bills, keeping up with mortgage payments can be daunting with the risk of losing one's home. The challenges to retain a home are stratified along racial differences. Black homeowners are twice as likely to lose their homes and transition back to renting than white homeowners, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study published in Demography. African American owners exit their homes at a rate of 10 percent compared with whites' exit rate of five percent. (2020-11-11)

Black hole or no black hole: On the outcome of neutron star collisions
A new study lead by GSI scientists and international colleagues investigates black-hole formation in neutron star mergers. Computer simulations show that the properties of dense nuclear matter play a crucial role, which directly links the astrophysical merger event to heavy-ion collision experiments at GSI and FAIR. These properties will be studied more precisely at the future FAIR facility. The results have now been published in Physical Review Letters. (2020-11-10)

Potentially preventable hospitalizations among older adults: 2010-2014
When complications due to diabetes, asthma, urinary tract infections, high blood pressure and other common conditions lead patients to visit the ER, researchers and health care quality administrators may label these visits as ''potentially preventable hospitalizations.'' That is, with good outpatient care, these visits could have been potentially avoided. Potentially preventable hospitalizations are costly and can negatively impact the health and well-being of individuals, particularly if they are older. (2020-11-10)

Black patients less likely to receive added, higher dose meds to control blood pressure
Racial inequities in treatment intensification - prescribing a new medication for hypertension or increasing the dose for existing medication - may be responsible for nearly one-third of racial disparities in treating the condition. Blood pressure control rates were lower in Black patients and higher in Asian American patients compared to other racial groups. (2020-11-09)

U.S.-born Black women at higher risk of preeclampsia than Black immigrants
Black women born in the United States have a higher risk of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy, a condition known as preeclampsia, compared to Black women who immigrated to the country. In this study of Black women in Boston, those who were not born in the U.S. had a 27% lower risk of preeclampsia, compared to Black women born in America. The risk increased for Black immigrants after they lived in the U.S. for more than 10 years. (2020-11-09)

Researchers present wild theory: Water may be naturally occurring on all rocky planets
Life is deeply dependent on water, but where does water come from? Based on new research, researchers from the University of Copenhagen believe it may emerge in connection with the formation of planets. (2020-11-09)

Attending an HBCU may protect Black students from later health problems
African Americans who attend Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCUs) may be at lower risk for health problems later in adulthood compared to African Americans who attend predominantly white institutions, a new study suggests. (2020-11-09)

New black hole merger simulations could help power next-gen gravitational wave detectors
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed new simulations of black holes with widely varying masses merging that could help power the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. RIT Professor Carlos Lousto and Research Associate James Healy from RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences outline these record-breaking simulations in a new Physical Review Letters paper. (2020-11-09)

Severe COVID-19 infection rare in newborns
Severe COVID-19 infection appears rare in newborn babies, suggests a new study. (2020-11-09)

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