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Current Blood clots News and Events

Current Blood clots News and Events, Blood clots News Articles.
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An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries
An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis. (2019-07-11)
Most dog and cat owners not aware of pet blood donation schemes
Most dog and cat owners are not aware of pet blood donation schemes and animal blood banks, finds a survey of pet owners published in Vet Record. (2019-07-09)
One in five haematological cancer patients suffer blood clots or bleeding
In the years following haematological cancer, one in five survivors suffer a blood clot or bleeding which requires hospital treatment. (2019-06-27)
Elevated first trimester blood pressure increases risk for pregnancy hypertensive disorders
Elevated blood pressure in the first trimester of pregnancy, or an increase in blood pressure between the first and second trimesters, raises the chances of a high blood pressure disorder of pregnancy, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-06-27)
Squeezing of blood vessels may contribute to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's
Reduced blood flow to the brain associated with early Alzheimer's may be caused by the contraction of cells wrapped around blood vessels, according to a UCL-led study that opens up a new way to potentially treat the disease. (2019-06-20)
Patients of surgeons with unprofessional behavior more likely to suffer complications
Patients of surgeons with higher numbers of reports from co-workers about unprofessional behavior are significantly more likely to experience complications during or after their operations, researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) reported today in JAMA Surgery. (2019-06-19)
Atrial fibrillation linked to increased risk of dementia, even in stroke-free patients
Atrial fibrillation is linked to an increased risk of dementia, even in people who have not suffered a stroke, according to the largest study to investigate the association in an elderly population published in the European Heart Journal. (2019-06-18)
Researchers question implanting IVC filters on prophylactic basis before bariatric surgery
Temple's Dr. Riyaz Bashir led a research team that sought to compare the outcomes associated with patients receiving prophylactic inferior vena cava filters (IVCF) prior to bariatric surgery to those who did not receive IVCFs. (2019-06-17)
Identification of protective antibodies may be key to effective malaria vaccine
Researchers from the University of Oxford, along with partners from five institutions around the world, have identified the human antibodies that prevent the malaria parasite from entering blood cells, which may be key to creating a highly effective malaria vaccination. (2019-06-13)
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University. (2019-06-13)
Sweating for science: A sauna session is just as exhausting as moderate exercise
Your blood pressure does not drop during a sauna visit - it rises, as well as your heart rate. (2019-06-12)
Sensitive, noninvasive platform detects circulating tumor cells in melanoma patients
Scientists have created a laser-based platform that can quickly and noninvasively screen large quantities of blood in patients with melanoma to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) -- a precursor to deadly metastases. (2019-06-12)
Eating more vitamin K found to help, not harm, patients on warfarin
When prescribed the anticoagulant drug warfarin, many patients are told to limit foods rich in vitamin K, such as green vegetables. (2019-06-11)
Unsalted tomato juice may help lower heart disease risk
In a study published in Food Science & Nutrition, drinking unsalted tomato juice lowered blood pressure and LDL cholesterol in Japanese adults at risk of cardiovascular disease. (2019-06-05)
Study follows the health of older adults with prediabetes problems
In a Journal of Internal Medicine study that followed older adults with prediabetes for 12 years, most remained stable or reverted to normal blood sugar levels, and only one-third developed diabetes or died. (2019-06-05)
New study sheds light on how blood vessel damage from high glucose concentrations unfolds
A mechanism in the cells that line our blood vessels that helps them to process glucose becomes uncontrolled in diabetes, and could be linked to the formation of blood clots and inflammation according to researchers from the University of Warwick. (2019-06-05)
Study finds link between ambient ozone exposure and progression of carotid wall thickness
Study of nearly 7,000 adults aged 45 to 84 from six US regions is first epidemiological study to provide evidence that ozone may advance subclinical arterial disease, providing insight into the relationship between ozone exposure and cardiovascular disease risk. (2019-05-29)
Stem cell identity unmasked by single cell sequencing technology
Scientists from The University of Queensland's Diamantina Institute have revealed the difference between a stem cell and other blood vessel cells using gene-sequencing technology. (2019-05-28)
Targeting inflammation to better understand dangerous blood clots
Forty percent of people who develop venous thromboembolism don't know what caused it. (2019-05-28)
Licorice tea causes hypertensive emergency in patient
Licorice tea, a popular herbal tea, is not without health risks, as a case study of a man admitted to hospital for a high-blood pressure emergency demonstrates in CMAJ. (2019-05-27)
NMR structure of a key anticoagulant protein may help prevent thrombosis
A group of researchers from Brazil and the United States describes for the first time the structure of Ixolaris, an important anticoagulant protein found in tick saliva, and its interaction with Factor Xa, a key enzyme in the process of blood clotting. (2019-05-27)
High sugar levels during pregnancy could lead to childhood obesity
The children of women who have high glucose blood levels during pregnancy, even if their mothers are not diagnosed with gestational diabetes, are at an increased risk of developing obesity in childhood, according to a new study published in PLOS One. (2019-05-24)
A Finnish study proves the presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli
Researchers at Tampere University have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens. (2019-05-23)
Aspirin green light for brain bleed stroke patients, study finds
People who suffer a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain -- known as brain haemorrhage -- can take common medicines without raising their risk of another stroke, a major clinical trial has found. (2019-05-22)
Novel technique reduces obstruction risk in heart valve replacement
Researchers at the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed a novel technique that prevents the obstruction of blood flow, a common fatal complication of transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR). (2019-05-20)
Optimizing device implantation in patients with atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke
According to clinical studies, about a third of patients with atrial fibrillation will suffer a stroke during their lifetime. (2019-05-15)
Blood flow command center discovered in the brain
An international team of researchers has discovered a group of cells in the brain that may function as a 'master-controller' for the cardiovascular system, orchestrating the control of blood flow to different parts of the body. (2019-05-15)
'Smart' molecules that selectively target abnormal cell growth in blood vessels may reduce reoccurring blockage after stenting
Artificial 'smart' molecules that selectively target certain blood-vessel cells and prevent abnormal growth, appear to reduce reoccurring blockages in blood vessels previously opened by stents, while sparing healthy endothelial cells lining the blood vessel. (2019-05-15)
Could sleep molecules lead to a blood test for Alzheimer's disease?
A new study published today in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, has found that a particular class of molecules may help with diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease. (2019-05-08)
Identifying therapeutic targets in sepsis' cellular videogame
Exciting new research has defined the chain of molecular events that goes awry in sepsis, opening up opportunities for new treatments to fight the condition that affects more than a million Americans each year and kills up to a third of them. (2019-05-08)
Side-by-side comparison on point of care tests for blood's ability to clot
During big procedures like open heart surgery, patients need anticoagulants to prevent dangerous blood clot formation and regular bedside monitoring to make sure the drugs aren't also causing problems like excessive bleeding. (2019-05-07)
Blood cancer's Achilles' heel opens door for new treatments
New findings about an aggressive form of leukemia could aid the development of novel drugs to treat the condition. (2019-04-25)
Impeding white blood cells in antiphospholipid syndrome reduced blood clots
A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition. (2019-04-25)
Research unlocks biomechanical mystery behind deadly blood clots
Researchers at the University of Sydney have used biomechanical engineering techniques to unlock the mystery surrounding the mechanical forces that influence blood clotting. (2019-04-04)
Researchers uncover new cause of abdominal aortic aneurysm
Researchers have discovered that a family of lipids (fats) contribute to the development of a serious aortic disease, by driving clotting in the blood vessel wall. (2019-04-04)
Decades-old misconception on white blood cell trafficking to spleen corrected
Contrary to prior belief, the white blood cells enter the spleen primarily via vessels in the red pulp. (2019-04-02)
Tumor microenvironment analyzed to increase effectiveness of preclinical trials
It was shown that co-culturing HeLa adenocarcinoma cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells results in changes in the proliferative activity of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stromal cell populations. (2019-04-02)
New medication gives mice bigger muscles
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. (2019-03-27)
Self-sustaining, bioengineered blood vessels could replace damaged vessels in patients
A research team has bioengineered blood vessels that safely and effectively integrated into the native circulatory systems of 60 patients with end-stage kidney failure over a four-year phase 2 clinical trial. (2019-03-27)
Aspirin to fight an expensive global killer infection
Tuberculosis is far from eradicated around the world and still infects more than 1,400 people per year in Australia. (2019-03-25)
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