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Dementia prevention strategies could save £1.9 billion annually
Programmes to reduce dementia risk by targeting smoking, high blood pressure and hearing loss are likely to be cost-effective and cost saving by reducing dementia rates by 8.5%, finds a new study by UCL and LSE researchers, published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity. (2020-10-20)
Scientists discover unusual materials properties at ultrahigh pressure
An international team of scientists from NUST MISIS (Russia), Linköping University (Sweden) and University of Bayreuth (Germany) found that, contrary to the usual physical and chemical laws, the structure of some materials does not condense at ultrahigh pressures. (2020-10-20)
CBD helps reduce lung damage from COVID by increasing levels of protective peptide
One way CBD appears to reduce the 'cytokine storm' that damages the lungs and kills many patients with COVID-19 is by enabling an increase in levels of a natural peptide called apelin, which is known to reduce inflammation and whose levels are dramatically reduced in the face of this storm. (2020-10-19)
High pressure is key for better optical fibers
Signal loss along optical communication networks could be cut in half if silica glass fibers are manufactured under high pressure. (2020-10-19)
An ultrasonic projector for medicine
A chip-based technology that modulates intensive sound pressure profiles with high resolution opens up new possibilities for ultrasound therapy. (2020-10-19)
New evidence to guide the practice of blood transfusions in children with severe malari
Blood transfusions increase the survival of children admitted to the hospital with complications by severe malaria, and could be beneficial even at higher haemoglobin levels than those currently recommended. (2020-10-19)
Wearable pressure-sensitive devices for medical use
Novel design and strategic use of materials in a pressure-sensitive adhesive strip. (2020-10-17)
USC study reveals one-two punch of symptoms that exacerbate Alzheimer's
A new Alzheimer's study found that impaired blood flow in the brain is correlated with the buildup of tau tangles, a hallmark indicator of cognitive decline.The work suggests that treatments targeting vascular health in the brain -- as well as amyloid plaques and tau tangles -- may be more effective in preserving memory (2020-10-16)
Research could change how blood pressure is managed in spinal cord injury patients
New research from the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD) challenges the current standard for managing blood pressure in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). (2020-10-15)
Chronic disease and public health failures fuel COVID-19 pandemic
Australia was not spared as a 30-year global rise in chronic illness and related risk factors such as obesity, high blood sugar, and outdoor air pollution created a perfect storm to fuel coronavirus (COVID-19) deaths, new research shows. (2020-10-15)
Mount Sinai researchers find that where people live can impact their risk for common chronic conditions including high blood pressure and depression
The researchers found that a persons' place of residence substantially influences their risk of uncontrolled chronic diseases including high blood pressure and depression (2020-10-14)
Studies offer new evidence for possible link between blood type & COVID-19 susceptibility
Two studies published today in Blood Advances suggest people with blood type O may have a lower risk of COVID-19 infection and reduced likelihood of severe outcomes, including organ complications, if they do get sick. (2020-10-14)
Wearable circuits printed directly on human skin
Wearable electronics are getting smaller, more comfortable and increasingly capable of interfacing with the human body. (2020-10-14)
Scientists discover mosquitoes' unique blood-taste detectors
Scientists aren't sure how mosquitoes sense taste of blood, or how they know that this, of all things, is something to gorge on. (2020-10-12)
'Danger molecule' associated with being obese, female and black in younger adults
A 'danger molecule' is higher in the blood of younger black adults than whites, females than males and increases with weight and age, researchers report in the first large, longitudinal study associating circulating HMGB1 levels with obesity, inflammation promoters and early indicators of cardiovascular risk in humans. (2020-10-08)
Could arm squeezes with blood pressure cuffs help the brain recover after stroke?
People who are given clot-busting drugs after a stroke may recover better if they also are given a therapy called remote ischemic postconditioning, according to a new study published in the October 7, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-07)
Pregnant women with severe COVID-19 face additional risks and early delivery
Pregnant women with severe or critical COVID-19 and their unborn infants face increased health risks before and after delivery but those with mild cases had similar outcomes compared to those who were uninfected, a Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School study finds. (2020-10-07)
Best materials for border molding in complete dentures fabrication
Application of border molding procedure in the treatment of edentulous jaws (toothlessness in either jaw) increases retention and stability of the prosthesis. (2020-10-06)
Pitt trauma experts aim to reduce deaths by providing blood-clotting agent
The study found the drug can help the most severely injured trauma patients. (2020-10-05)
Study reveals risk factors for acute kidney injury after brain hemorrhage
Patients who suffer an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) face an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) during their hospitalization. (2020-10-05)
Exposure to vitamin D in the womb might minimize risk of high blood pressure for children born to mothers with preeclampsia
Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy--but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb. (2020-10-05)
High blood pressure linked to baroreflex in rats
Researchers describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats. (2020-10-03)
Users of blood pressure medicine have a lower risk of dying from influenza and pneumonia
Thousands of Danes use ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers against elevated blood pressure or heart problems, and they may have an improved chance of surviving severe influenza or pneumonia infections. (2020-10-02)
Study highlights shortcomings in telemedicine despite large increases in remote consults during COVID-19 pandemic
Despite increased use of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans have had significantly fewer consultations with primary care doctors and markedly fewer assessments of common cardiac risk factors. (2020-10-02)
Study: Sleep apnea treatment reduces heart problems in patients with prediabetes
A new study found that people with prediabetes and obstructive sleep apnea can reduce their daytime resting heart rate and risk of cardiovascular disease by using a CPAP machine at night. (2020-10-01)
Flexible and biodegradable electronic blood vessels
Researchers in China and Switzerland have developed electronic blood vessels that can be actively tuned to address subtle changes in the body after implantation. (2020-10-01)
Using machine learning to predict pediatric brain injury
When newborn babies or children with heart or lung distress are struggling to survive, doctors often turn to a form of life support that uses artificial lungs. (2020-10-01)
Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs
Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health. (2020-09-30)
Obstructive sleep apnea risk varies in patients with different types of epilepsy
People with generalized epilepsy who have seizures arising from both sides of the brain simultaneously, have a higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) compared to patients who have focal epilepsy where seizures emanate from one area of the brain, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-09-29)
Heart disease in young people may be linked to diabetes exposure in the womb
Heart disease in young adults and teenagers may be related to exposure to diabetes in the womb, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190797. (2020-09-28)
New abdominal aortic aneurysm genes identified, could help pinpoint those at risk
A study of US veterans identified 14 genes that may predict the risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm. (2020-09-28)
Unconventional T cell subset enriched in airways of some patients with severe COVID-19
Unconventional T cells called mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are recruited to the airways and strongly activated in some patients with severe COVID-19, a new study has found, suggesting the cells' possible involvement in the development of disease. (2020-09-28)
New potential treatment approach for patients with salt sensitive hypertension
A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has found that an alpha adrenoceptor blocker (a class of drugs that relaxes smooth muscle or blood vessels) may represent a new treatment approach for patients with salt sensitive hypertension. (2020-09-28)
CNIC design an algorithm for personalized cardiovascular risk estimation in healthy people
A machine learning tool assesses a range of variables including age, blood pressure, diet, and blood and urine markers. (2020-09-28)
How to bounce back from stretched out stretchable sensors
Elastic can stretch too far and that could be problematic in wearable sensors. (2020-09-24)
A study could provide guideline for exercise training aimed at high blood pressure patient
Brazilian researchers' finding that exercising in the evening reduces blood pressure more than in the morning can help health professionals choose the time of day for aerobic training depending on the type of anti-hypertensive drug they take. (2020-09-24)
Your neighborhood may raise your risk of chronic kidney disease
A neighborhood's overall socioeconomic status, including income and education-level, may influence its residents' risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a study recently published in SSM Population Health by researchers from Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-09-23)
Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2020-09-22)
Wound therapy device might not lower infection risk in women with obesity after C-section
Indiana University School of Medicine researchers are learning more about ways to prevent infections in women with obesity who have cesarean delivery. (2020-09-22)
NASA sees Wilfred degenerate into a trough
Former Tropical Storm Wilfred weakened in the Central Atlantic Ocean and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image after the storm became a trough or elongated area of low pressure. (2020-09-21)
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