Current Blood vessel News and Events

Current Blood vessel News and Events, Blood vessel News Articles.
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Miniscule robots of metal and plastic
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for manufacturing micrometre-long machines by interlocking multiple materials in a complex way. Such microrobots will one day revolutionize the field of medicine. (2020-11-24)

Simple new testing method aims to improve time-release drugs
UC Riverside engineers filled a glass tube bent like a tuning fork, kept vibrating by a circuit at its resonance frequency, with simulated stomach and intestine contents and passed an over-the-counter time-release drug granule through the tube. They observed a brief change in the frequency. When plotted, they could compare the peaks of resonance frequency against the time to learn the buoyant mass of the drug granule at that moment. (2020-11-24)

Study: COVID-19 infection combined with blood clots worsen patient outcomes
While respiratory issues continue to be the most common symptom of a COVID-19 infection, new research indicates the disease could also be associated with an increased tendency of the blood to clot, leading to a higher risk of death from COVID-19. (2020-11-23)

Biofriendly protocells pump up blood vessels
In a new study published today in Nature Chemistry, Professor Stephen Mann and Dr Mei Li from Bristol's School of Chemistry, together with Associate Professor Jianbo Liu and colleagues at Hunan University and Central South University in China, prepared synthetic protocells coated in red blood cell fragments for use as nitric oxide generating bio-bots within blood vessels. (2020-11-20)

A bypass route for the coronary vessels in the heart?
When the heart develops, some of its coronary blood vessels develop from cells lining the inner surface of the heart's ventricular chambers (endocardium). Novel findings suggest that new blood vessel growth in the heart can be stimulated with the VEGF-B growth factor from the same source after myocardial infarction to increase blood delivery to the damaged area. (2020-11-19)

Ticagrelor was not superior to clopidogrel to reduce heart attack risk during angioplasty
A new study found the rate of heart attack and severe complications before, during or soon after elective surgery to open a blocked artery was similar between patients treated with clopidogrel and those who received the more potent antiplatelet medication ticagrelor. (2020-11-14)

Protein in blood may predict prognosis, recovery from stroke
Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida and collaborators have found that a biomarker in the blood may determine the extent of brain injury from different types of strokes and predict prognosis in these patients. Their findings are reported in Science Translational Medicine. (2020-11-11)

COVID-delayed Arctic research cruise yields late-season data
Researchers studying the Bering and Chukchi seas for three weeks in October found no ice and a surprisingly active ecosystem as they added another year's data to a key climate change record. The research vessel Norseman II carried scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Clark University. (2020-11-11)

Tracking down the causes of heart attack
Heart attacks strike suddenly and have a range of different triggers. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) were able to uncover a further underlying cause. Studying arterial deposits (plaque) in patients with acute coronary syndrome, the researchers found that, in some patients, these were characterized by activated immune cells which, as a result of altered flow conditions within the vessel, had accumulated on the interior arterial wall, causing damage to the arterial lining. (2020-11-10)

Asian ethnicity strongly linked to COVID-related stroke
Asian ethnicity is strongly linked to COVID-related stroke, reveals an analysis of stroke centre activity in England and Scotland during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2020-11-05)

COVID-19 linked to worse stroke outcomes
People who experience strokes while infected with COVID-19 appear to be left with greater disability after the stroke, according a study led by UCL and UCLH researchers. (2020-11-05)

Venous origin of brain blood-vessel malformations
In the condition known as cavernoma, lesions arise in a cluster of blood vessels in the brain, spinal cord or retina. Researchers from Uppsala University can now show, at molecular level, that these changes originate in vein cells. This new knowledge of the condition creates potential for developing better therapies for patients. The study has been published in the journal eLife. (2020-11-03)

New research shows SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins disrupt the blood-brain barrier
New work by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University shows that the spike proteins that extrude from SARS-CoV-2 promote inflammatory responses on the endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier. The study, published in the December print issue of the journal Neurobiology of Disease, is the first to show that SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins can cause this barrier to become ''leaky,'' potentially disrupting the delicate neural networks within the brain. (2020-10-29)

A patch that could help heal broken hearts
According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide in recent years. During a heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), a blocked artery and the resulting oxygen deprivation cause massive cardiac cell death, blood vessel impairment and inflammation. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a cardiac patch with tiny engineered blood vessels that improved recovery from MI in rats and pigs. (2020-10-28)

New strategy for treating common retinal diseases shows promise
Scientists at Scripps Research have uncovered a potential new strategy for treating eye diseases that affect millions of people around the world, often resulting in blindness. (2020-10-27)

Plant compound reduces cognitive deficits in mouse model of Down syndrome
The plant compound apigenin improved the cognitive and memory deficits usually seen in a mouse model of Down syndrome, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. Apigenin is found in chamomile flowers, parsley, celery, peppermint and citrus fruits. The findings raise the possibility that a treatment to lessen the cognitive deficits seen in Down syndrome could one day be offered to pregnant women whose fetuses have been diagnosed with Down syndrome through prenatal testing. (2020-10-23)

Ketamine, a painkiller used by the army, does not impair tolerance to blood loss
A low dose of ketamine, administered intravenously, does not alter a healthy human's tolerance to blood loss. In other words, if someone was given ketamine to kill pain associated with a battlefield injury, they would be able to tolerate blood loss just as well as someone who did not received this pain killer. (2020-10-21)

Researchers identify genetic variants linked to toxic side effects from bevacizumab
In the largest study of its kind, researchers have found two common genetic variants that can be used to predict whether or not cancer patients might suffer severe adverse side-effects, such as high blood pressure, from the drug bevacizumab. The genome-wide association study is the largest such study in patients being treated with bevacizumab and it is to be presented at the 32th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics. (2020-10-21)

New evidence to guide the practice of blood transfusions in children with severe malari
Blood transfusions increase the survival of children admitted to the hospital with complications by severe malaria, and could be beneficial even at higher haemoglobin levels than those currently recommended. These are the main findings of a study led by ISGlobal, a centre supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation, and published in The Lancet Haematology. (2020-10-19)

USC study reveals one-two punch of symptoms that exacerbate Alzheimer's
A new Alzheimer's study found that impaired blood flow in the brain is correlated with the buildup of tau tangles, a hallmark indicator of cognitive decline.The work suggests that treatments targeting vascular health in the brain -- as well as amyloid plaques and tau tangles -- may be more effective in preserving memory (2020-10-16)

Research could change how blood pressure is managed in spinal cord injury patients
New research from the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD) challenges the current standard for managing blood pressure in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). (2020-10-15)

New insight into neovessel formation shows promise in future treatment of cardiovascular diseases
A new study by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland provides novel insight into the previously unknown effects of factors regulating blood vessel formation. In the study, bone morphogenetic factor 6, i.e. BMP6, was shown - for the first time - to regulate blood vessel formation via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and Hippo signalling pathway. The findings can be used in developing treatments for cardiovascular diseases. (2020-10-14)

Studies offer new evidence for possible link between blood type & COVID-19 susceptibility
Two studies published today in Blood Advances suggest people with blood type O may have a lower risk of COVID-19 infection and reduced likelihood of severe outcomes, including organ complications, if they do get sick. (2020-10-14)

Layer of strength, layer of functionality for biomedical fibers
Wound dressing, tissue scaffolding, controlled and sustained drug delivery, and cardiac patching are all biomedical processes requiring a material that combines strength with functionality. Core-sheath polymer fibers, fibers comprised of a strong core surrounded by a biologically applicable sheath layer, are an affordable way to meet these requirements. In the journal Applied Physics Reviews, researchers discuss methods of producing core-sheath polymer fibers and their promising applications. (2020-10-13)

Young women who suffer a heart attack have worse outcomes than men
Women aged 50 or younger who suffer a heart attack are more likely than men to die over the following 11 years, according to a new study published in the European Heart Journal. The study found that women were less likely to undergo therapeutic invasive procedures after admission to hospital with a heart attack or to be treated with certain medical therapies upon discharge, such as aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins. (2020-10-13)

Scientists discover mosquitoes' unique blood-taste detectors
Scientists aren't sure how mosquitoes sense taste of blood, or how they know that this, of all things, is something to gorge on. Nothing else, not even sweet nectar, makes them pump as ferociously as when they're draining our veins. New research identifies a unique group of neurons that don't care about simple tastes like sweet or salty. Rather, they activate only when sugar, salt, and other components of blood are all present at once. (2020-10-12)

Unraveling the network of molecules that influence COVID-19 severity
Researchers from the Morgridge Institute for Research, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Albany Medical College have identified more than 200 molecular features that strongly correlate with COVID-19 severity, offering insight into potential treatment options for those with advanced disease. (2020-10-12)

RUDN University chemists developed a domino reaction for producing new antitumor drugs
A team of chemists from RUDN University suggested a new reaction to produce organic compounds in one vessel. The end products turned out to be effective against the cells of carcinomas, including drug-resistant ones. (2020-10-09)

Scientists developed key principles for creating an artificial vessel
Researchers from St. Petersburg provided a unique experiment. They implanted a polymer scaffold as a vascular prosthesis into the rat abdominal aorta and monitored the process of its bioresobtion for 16 months. An artificial vessel was formed where the scaffold was located. It posess similar characteristics as a natural vessel. (2020-10-08)

'Danger molecule' associated with being obese, female and black in younger adults
A 'danger molecule' is higher in the blood of younger black adults than whites, females than males and increases with weight and age, researchers report in the first large, longitudinal study associating circulating HMGB1 levels with obesity, inflammation promoters and early indicators of cardiovascular risk in humans. (2020-10-08)

Forearm artery reveals humans evolving from changes in natural selection
Humans haven't developed genetic mutations for telepathy or superpowers just yet, but a new study shows our species is still evolving in unique ways and changes in the natural selection could be the major reason. (2020-10-06)

Millimetre-precision drug delivery to the brain
Focused ultrasound waves help ETH researchers to deliver drugs to the brain with pinpoint accuracy, in other words only to where their effect is desired. This method is set to enable treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders and tumours with fewer side effects in the future. (2020-10-05)

New method for in utero 4D imaging of baby hearts may aid diagnosis of congenital heart disease
Researchers at King's College London have developed a new method for helping detect congenital heart disease of a baby in pregnant mothers using MRI. Existing in-utero approaches are compromised by fetal motion, but the novel method corrects the motion to present 4D visualizations of the heart depicting major vessels and blood flow circulation. With further development, the method could become a new tool for aiding diagnosis of congenital heart disease where conventional methods like ultrasound might fail. (2020-10-05)

Discovery holds potential for reversing vision loss
Scientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have identified a compound that could reverse the vision loss that occurs when blood vessels in the eyes of premature infants and adults grow out of control. (2020-10-05)

High blood pressure linked to baroreflex in rats
Researchers describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats. (2020-10-03)

Flexible and biodegradable electronic blood vessels
Researchers in China and Switzerland have developed electronic blood vessels that can be actively tuned to address subtle changes in the body after implantation. The blood vessels--made of a metal-polymer conductor membrane that's flexible and biodegradable--mimic natural blood vessels, were conductive in in vitro experiments, and were able to effectively replace key arteries in rabbits. The research appears October 1 in the journal Matter. (2020-10-01)

Cancer cells use nerve-cell tricks to spread from one organ to the next
New research suggests that breast and lung tumors metastasize by hijacking a neural signaling pathway, potentially opening the door to better diagnostics and treatments. (2020-09-30)

Deep learning model provides rapid detection of stroke-causing blockages
A sophisticated type of artificial intelligence (AI) called deep learning can help rapidly detect blockages in the arteries that supply blood to the head, potentially speeding the onset of life-saving treatment, according to a study. (2020-09-29)

Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown. (2020-09-29)

Unconventional T cell subset enriched in airways of some patients with severe COVID-19
Unconventional T cells called mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are recruited to the airways and strongly activated in some patients with severe COVID-19, a new study has found, suggesting the cells' possible involvement in the development of disease. (2020-09-28)

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