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Current Body language News and Events, Body language News Articles.
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Suicidal thoughts can be reduced among Indigenous people; this new study finds the factors
New nationally representative Canadian study from the University of Toronto and Algoma University finds that 3-quarters of formerly suicidal Indigenous adults who are living off-reserve had been free from suicidal thoughts in the past year. (2019-07-23)
Study finds maternal race not a factor for children experiencing a 'language gap'
Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute have discovered that race plays no role in the amount and quality of the words mothers use with their children, or with the language skills their children later develop. (2019-07-18)
how the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
Is the brain capable of distinguishing a voice from phonemes? (2019-07-17)
Community size matters when people create a new language
Why do some languages have simpler grammars than others? Researchers from the Netherlands and the UK propose that the size of the community influences the complexity of the language that evolves in it. (2019-07-17)
Rutgers collaborates with WHO to more accurately describe mental health disorders
A Rutgers University researcher collaborated with the World Health Organization on the first study to seek input from people with common mental health issues on how their disorders are described in diagnostic guidelines. (2019-07-16)
What to call someone who uses heroin?
A first-of-its-kind study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), published in the journal Addiction, has found that people entering treatment for heroin use most often called themselves 'addicts,' but preferred that others called them 'people who use drugs.' (2019-07-16)
UTSA researcher studies how individuals use technology to engage with their cultures
As the nation continues to get more diverse, it's common for immigrant populations in the United States to identify with two or more cultures at the same time. (2019-07-12)
The voice is key to making sense of the words in our brain
Scientists at the Basque research centre BCBL conclude that the voice is fundamental for mentally presenting the meaning of words in the brain. (2019-07-12)
How does playing with other children affect toddlers' language learning?
Toddlers are surprisingly good at processing the speech of other young children, according to a new study. (2019-07-10)
Surveys fail to capture big five personality traits in non-WEIRD populations
Questions commonly used to explore the ''Big Five'' personality traits--Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism--generally fail to measure the intended personality traits in developing countries, according to a new study. (2019-07-10)
Many still uninsured after Affordable Care Act Implementation
In community health centers in Medicaid expansion states, among established patients who were uninsured prior to the Affordable Care Act, many remained uninsured after implementation of the Obama-era law. (2019-07-10)
The UC3M programs a humanoid robot to communicate in sign language
Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have published a paper featuring the results of research into interactions between robots and deaf people, in which they were able to programme a humanoid - called TEO - to communicate in sign language. (2019-07-08)
Good home learning in early years boosts your secondary school achievements
The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child's early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, according to a new study published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement. (2019-07-07)
Neurosciences unlock the secret of the first abstract engravings
Long before Lascaux paintings, humans engraved abstract motifs on stones. (2019-07-03)
Study finds dramatic differences in tests assessing preschoolers' language skills
Researchers examined the impact of preterm birth on language outcomes in preschoolers born preterm and full-term, using both standardized assessment and language sample analysis. (2019-07-02)
CCNY experts in lateralization of speech publish discovery
City College of New York-led researchers have published a breakthrough in understanding previously unknown inner workings related to the lateralization of speech processing in the brain. (2019-07-01)
Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired
Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. (2019-06-27)
Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests
Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. (2019-06-25)
Scientists closer to unraveling mechanisms of speech processing in the brain
A new study that sheds light on how the brain processes language could lead to a better understanding of autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental conditions. (2019-06-25)
Analyzing the tweets of Republicans and Democrats
New research examined how Republicans and Democrats express themselves online in an attempt to understand how polarization of beliefs occurs on social media. (2019-06-25)
Understanding brain activity when you name what you see
Using complex statistical methods and fast measurement techniques, researchers found how the brain network comes up with the right word and enables us to say it. (2019-06-24)
3D technology might improve body appreciation for young women
Virginia Ramseyer Winter, assistant professor in the School of Social Work and director of the MU Center for Body Image Research and Policy, is a nationally recognized body image expert. (2019-06-20)
Study: Eyes hold clues for treating severe autism more effectively
In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research. (2019-06-19)
Facebook posts better at predicting diabetes, mental health than demographic info
Analyzing language shows that identifying certain groups of words significantly improves upon predicting some medical conditions in patients (2019-06-17)
One class in all languages
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new machine translation system that outputs subtitles in multiple languages for archived university lectures. (2019-06-14)
Language-savvy parents improve their children's reading development, Concordia study shows
Parents with higher reading-related knowledge are not only more likely to have children with higher reading scores but are also more attentive when those children read out loud to them. (2019-06-14)
New application can detect Twitter bots in any language
Thanks to fruitful collaboration between language scholars and machine learning specialists, a new application developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Linnaeus University in Sweden can detect Twitter bots independent of the language used. (2019-06-13)
The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis
Automated analysis of the two language variables -- more frequent use of words associated with sound and speaking with low semantic density, or vagueness -- can predict whether an at-risk person will later develop psychosis with 93 percent accuracy. (2019-06-13)
A student's disability status depends on where they go to school, PSU study finds
A new Portland State University study suggests that the likelihood of a child being classified with an educational disability depends on the characteristics of their school and how distinctive they are from their peers (2019-05-29)
How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production
Green monkeys' alarm calls allow conclusions about the evolution of language. (2019-05-27)
Do you hear what I hear?
A new study by Columbia University researchers found that infants at high risk for autism were less attuned to differences in speech patterns than low-risk infants. (2019-05-24)
'Implicit measures' better assess vocabulary for those with autism than standard tests
In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research. (2019-05-21)
Testifying while black: A linguistic analysis of disparities in court transcription
A new study has found that court reporters transcribe speakers of African American English significantly below their required level of accuracy. (2019-05-21)
SCAI releases multi-society endorsed consensus on the classification stages of cardiogenic shock
A newly released expert consensus statement proposes a classification schema for cardiogenic shock that will facilitate communication in both the clinical and research settings. (2019-05-20)
Nivolumab with ipilimumab: Combination has added benefit in advanced renal cell carcinoma
There are advantages in overall survival, which are not offset by any disadvantages of similar importance. (2019-05-17)
'Brand Me' presentations increase students' confidence and enhance their employability
The University of Portsmouth is helping its students build a strong personal brand to increase their confidence and enhance their employability. (2019-05-17)
To win online debates, social networks worth a thousand words
According to Cornell researchers, social interactions are more important than language in predicting who is going to succeed at online debating. (2019-05-16)
Bristol academic cracks Voynich code, solving century-old mystery of medieval text
A University of Bristol academic has succeeded where countless cryptographers, linguistics scholars and computer programs have failed - by cracking the code of the 'world's most mysterious text', the Voynich manuscript. (2019-05-15)
Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations
With growing evidence of gender bias on student course evaluations, a new intervention developed by Iowa State University researchers may help reduce bias against women instructors. (2019-05-15)
New study shows toddlers are great at getting the conversation started
Conversation is an important part of what makes us human. (2019-05-14)
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