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Current Bone marrow News and Events

Current Bone marrow News and Events, Bone marrow News Articles.
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Texas A&M lab engineers 3D-functional bone tissues
Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar, associate professor, has developed a highly printable bioink as a platform to generate anatomical-scale functional tissues. (2020-05-19)
Advanced X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease
The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body. (2020-05-19)
New study records dual hand use in early human relative
Research by anthropologists at the University of Kent has identified hand use behavior in fossil human relatives that is consistent with modern humans. (2020-05-18)
The malaria parasite P. vivax can remain in the spleen upon expression of certain proteins
The malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax can adhere to human spleen cells through the expression of so-called variant proteins. (2020-05-18)
New bone-graft biomaterial gives patients a nicer smile and less pain
A new recipe for a bone-graft biomaterial that is supercooled before application should make it easier to meet dental patients' expectation of a good-looking smile while eliminating the pain associated with harvesting bone from elsewhere in their body. (2020-05-15)
First screening test for detecting lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer patients
For years, surgeons have operated on pancreatic cancer patients to remove what they thought was a localized tumor only to discover that the disease had spread to other, inoperable parts of the body. (2020-05-15)
Critical window for re-infection with HIV after stem cell transplantation
So far, allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of severe blood cancers has been the only medical intervention to have cured at least three people infected with the HI virus. (2020-05-14)
Moffitt Cancer Center study suggests more could benefit from CAR T-cell therapy
Moffitt Cancer Center organized a consortium of 16 cancer treatment facilities across the US that offer Yescarta as a standard-of-care therapy for patients with relapsed/refractory large B cell lymphoma. (2020-05-14)
Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood. (2020-05-12)
Blood cells could serve as a 'thermometer' to detect breast cancer
This study shows that patients develop alterations in a type of leukocyte at the initial stage of the disease. (2020-05-12)
Fred Hutch, NIH experts outline plan for COVID-19 vaccines
In a perspective published online May 11 by the journal Science, Fred Hutch's Dr. (2020-05-11)
New research determines our species created earliest modern artifacts in Europe
Blade-like tools and animal tooth pendants previously discovered in Europe, and once thought to possibly be the work of Neanderthals, are in fact the creation of Homo sapiens, or modern humans, who emigrated from Africa, finds a new analysis by an international team of researchers. (2020-05-11)
More selective elimination of leukemia stem cells and blood stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells from a healthy donor can help patients suffering from acute leukemia. (2020-05-08)
Trial questions benefits of organic nitrates for bone health
A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that organic nitrates do not have clinically relevant effects on bone mineral density or bone turnover in postmenopausal women, and the medications caused significant side effects. (2020-05-06)
NEJM study shows drug saves lives of kids fighting deadly immune disease
After 20 years of trying, modern medicine remains unable to lower the roughly 40% mortality rate for the severe childhood immune disease called HLH (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis), which damages vital organs and tissues. (2020-05-06)
Brain emotional activity linked to blood vessel inflammation in recent heart attack patients
People with recent heart attacks have significantly higher activity in a brain area (the amygdala) involved in stress perception and emotional response. (2020-05-05)
UB investigators uncover cellular mechanism involved in Krabbe disease
Researchers determined which cells are involved in Krabbe disease and by which mechanism. (2020-05-05)
Study finds unexpected suspect in age-related macular degeneration
Scientists have identified an unexpected player in the immune reaction gone awry that causes vision loss in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-05-05)
New MDS subtype proposed based on presence of genetic mutation
In a special report published today in the journal Blood, an international working group of experts in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) proposes -- for the first time -- the recognition of a distinct subtype of MDS based on the presence of a nonheritable genetic mutation that causes the disease. (2020-04-29)
Immune-regulating drug improves gum disease in mice
A drug that has life-extending effects on mice also reverses age-related dental problems in the animals, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-04-28)
Micro-CT scans give clues about how hero shrews' bizarre backbones evolved
Hero shrews have some of the weirdest backbones in the animal kingdom -- they're incredibly strong, with stories of a 0.25-pound shrew supporting a grown man standing on its back. (2020-04-28)
Immune system changes occur early in development of multiple myeloma, study finds
Long before multiple myeloma becomes a malignant disease, the collection of immune system cells and signal carriers amid the tumor cells undergoes dramatic shifts, with alterations in both the number and type of immune cells, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) report in a new study. (2020-04-27)
Palaeontology: Fossil frogs offer insights into ancient Antarctica
The discovery of the earliest known modern amphibians in Antarctica provides further evidence of a warm and temperate climate in the Antarctic Peninsula before its separation from the southern supercontinent, Gondwana. (2020-04-23)
Discovered the physiological mechanisms underlying the most common pediatric Leukemia
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute unveil the mechanisms that lead to hyperdiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Hyper D-ALL, the most common pediatric B-cell Leukaemia. (2020-04-23)
UCLA scientists invent nanoparticle that could improve treatment for bone defects
In a test on mice, UCLA researchers showed that their sterosome, when implanted in a bone defect, activated bone regeneration without needing additional drugs. (2020-04-22)
Increased rate of infections may indicate a future cancer diagnosis
Patients experienced a greater occurrence of infections in the years preceding a cancer diagnosis. (2020-04-17)
Under pressure: New bioinspired material can 'shapeshift' to external forces
Inspired by how human bone and colorful coral reefs adjust mineral deposits in response to their surrounding environments, Johns Hopkins researchers have created a self-adapting material that can change its stiffness in response to the applied force. (2020-04-17)
Chinese scientists optimize strontium content to improve bioactive bone cement
Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a new strontium-substituted bioactive glass (BG) bone cement that optimizes the concentration of strontium to improve peri-implant bone formation and bone-implant contact. (2020-04-14)
Molecular & isotopic evidence of milk, meat & plants in prehistoric food systems
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, with colleagues from the University of Florida, provide the first evidence for diet and subsistence practices of ancient East African pastoralists. (2020-04-13)
Excess weight during pre-school linked to higher bone fracture risk
Pre-school children who are overweight or obese have a higher risk of bone fractures during childhood than normal weight preschoolers, according to a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (2020-04-08)
Cancer scientists at Purdue aim to use protein power to stop tumor growth
Purdue University scientists have created a new therapy option that may help halt tumor growth in certain cancers such as prostate, which is among the most common types of cancer in men. (2020-04-07)
Coquí fossil from Puerto Rico takes title of oldest Caribbean frog
The bright chirp of the coquí frog, the national symbol of Puerto Rico, has likely resounded through Caribbean forests for at least 29 million years. (2020-04-07)
Broken bone location can have significant impact on long-term health
In older individuals, the location of a broken bone can have significant impacts on long-term health outcomes, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)
Consuming extra calories can help exercising women avoid menstrual disorders
Exercising women who struggle to consume enough calories and have menstrual disorders can simply increase their food intake to recover their menstrual cycle, according to a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)
NIH researchers discover gene for rare disease of excess bone tissue growth
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a second gene that causes melorheostosis, a rare group of conditions involving an often painful and disfiguring overgrowth of bone tissue. (2020-03-31)
A 'cardiac patch with bioink' developed to repair heart
A joint research team of POSTECH, The Catholic University, and City University of Hong Kong developed an 'in vivo priming' with heart-derived bioink. (2020-03-30)
Research identifies regular climbing behavior in a human ancestor
A new study led by the University of Kent has found evidence that human ancestors as recent as two million years ago may have regularly climbed trees. (2020-03-30)
New drug could reverse treatment resistance in advanced multiple myeloma
Researchers at the VU University Medical Center in the Netherlands have tested a new drug in patient samples and mice with multiple myeloma and discovered that it was effective even in advanced disease -- a point when many patients currently run out of options. (2020-03-27)
Scientist uses 'mini brains' to model how to prevent development of abnormally small heads
A scientist is one step closer to discovering what weakens a pathogen that appears to cause babies to be born with abnormally small heads or microcephaly. (2020-03-27)
New 'more effective' stem cell transplant method could aid blood cancer patients
Researchers at UCL have developed a new way to make blood stem cells present in the umbilical cord 'more transplantable', a finding in mice which could improve the treatment of a wide range of blood diseases in children and adults. (2020-03-26)
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