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Current Bone marrow News and Events

Current Bone marrow News and Events, Bone marrow News Articles.
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Prostate cancer bone metastases thwart immunotherapy by producing TGF-β
Prostate cancer that spreads to the bone triggers the destruction of bone tissue that thwarts the effectiveness of immune checkpoint inhibitors. (2019-11-14)
Can cells collected from bone marrow repair brain damage in babies with CHD?
An upcoming clinical trial at Children's National Hospital will harness cardiopulmonary bypass as a delivery mechanism for a novel intervention designed to stimulate brain growth and repair in children who undergo cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease. (2019-11-14)
Scientists explore Egyptian mummy bones with x-rays and infrared light
Experiments at Berkeley Lab are casting a new light on Egyptian soil and ancient mummified bone samples that could provide a richer understanding of daily life and environmental conditions thousands of years ago. (2019-11-12)
New vaccine protects from widespread, costly infection, mice study shows
A newly developed experimental vaccine was more than eighty percent effective in protecting mice from succumbing to Staphylococcus aureus infection. (2019-11-11)
Salmonella -- how the body fights back
New research shows how our immune system fights back against Salmonella infection. (2019-11-11)
ADA2 is a specific biomarker for MAS in systemic JIA
According to new research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) in the peripheral blood is a sensitive, specific biomarker for macrophage activation syndrome, a potentially life-threatening complication of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (systemic JIA). (2019-11-09)
New technique to identify a common cause to TMA diseases for which there is a treatment
Researchers have developed a technique that allows detecting an anomaly in the alternative pathway of the complement system, a part of our immune system that if deregulated can attack the patient's own endothelial cells and cause thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a severe injury common to a diversity of diseases. (2019-11-08)
Study helps explain why exercise guards against heart disease
Researchers have identified a previously unknown biological pathway that promotes chronic inflammation and may help explain why sedentary people have an increased risk for heart disease and strokes. (2019-11-07)
Modified CRISPR gene editing tool could improve therapies for HIV, sickle cell disease
City of Hope researchers may have found a way to sharpen the fastest, cheapest and most accurate gene editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9, so that it can more successfully cut out undesirable genetic information. (2019-11-07)
New X-ray technology could revolutionize how doctors identify abnormalities
Using ground-breaking technology, researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and University of Baltimore (UMB) are testing a new method of X-ray imaging that uses color to identify microfractures in bones. (2019-11-07)
Shortened sleep may negatively affect women's bone health
Getting too little sleep was linked with a higher risk of having low bone mineral density (BMD) and developing osteoporosis, as reported in a recent Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of postmenopausal women. (2019-11-06)
New technology promises improved treatment of inflammatory diseases
A study led by researchers at Washington State University has uncovered a potential new treatment approach for diseases associated with inflammation, including sepsis and stroke. (2019-11-06)
Blood cancers: New generation stem cell transplant significantly reduces complications for patients
In a Phase One-Two clinical trial, the great majority of patients with blood cancers are on the road to recovery, thanks to the UM171 molecule, discovered at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) of the Université de Montréal. (2019-11-05)
Transient wave of hematopoietic stem cell production in late fetuses and young adults
A major challenge in regenerative medicine is producing tailor-made hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for transplantation. (2019-11-04)
Adaptive human immunity depends on the factor responsible for the formation of white blood cells
Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)has a significant regulatory effect not only on innate, but also on adaptive immunity. (2019-10-31)
Therapy for neuroendocrine tumors may be improved by patient-specific dosimetry
In neuroendocrine tumor treatment, different methods of predicting patient response may be required for different patients. (2019-10-29)
Novel approach identifies factors linked to poor treatment outcomes in ALL
Profiling the metabolites produced in the bone marrow at the time of diagnosis enabled researchers to identify high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. (2019-10-24)
Anti-arthritis drug also stops tuberculosis bacillus from multiplying in blood stem cells
Immunologist Johan Van Weyenbergh (KU Leuven) and his Belgian-Brazilian colleagues have shown that a drug used to fight arthritis also stops the process that allows the tuberculosis bacillus to infect and hijack blood stem cells. (2019-10-23)
BU researchers accurately estimate the sex of skeletons based on elbow features
An elbow can help determine the sex of a skeleton. (2019-10-23)
Bone regrowth using ceramic substitute and E. coli-derived growth factors
Synthetic bone substitutes are promising materials for bone defect repair, but their efficacy can be substantially improved by bioactive agents such as growth factors. (2019-10-17)
Adults with undiagnosed Celiac disease have lower bone density, says first study on topic
Research by George Mason University College of Health and Human Services found lower bone density in adults who are likely to have undiagnosed celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by consuming gluten, despite this group consuming more calcium and phosphorous than the control group. (2019-10-17)
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone
The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two -- and why? (2019-10-17)
Encyclopedic tumor analysis for guiding treatment of advanced, broadly refractory cancers: results from the RESILIENT trial
RESILIENT was a single arm, open label, phase II/III study to test if label agnostic therapy regimens guided by Encyclopedic Tumor Analysis can offer meaningful clinical benefit for patients with relapsed refractory metastatic malignancies. (2019-10-11)
Viagra helps mobilize bone marrow stem cells for transplantation in mice
The combination of two clinically approved drugs -- Viagra and Plerixafor -- rapidly and efficiently mobilizes blood stem cells from the bone marrow into the bloodstream in mice, researchers report Oct. (2019-10-10)
Viagra shows promise for use in bone marrow transplants
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have demonstrated a new, rapid method to obtain donor stem cells for bone marrow transplants using a combination of Viagra and a second drug called Plerixafor. (2019-10-10)
New research uncovers how common genetic mutation drives cancer
A new, multicenter study led by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center determined how a single mutation in splicing factor 3b subunit 1 (SF3B1), the most frequently mutated splicing factor gene, drives the formation of many cancers. (2019-10-09)
First cell map of developing human liver reveals how blood and immune system develops
In a world first, scientists have created the human developmental liver cell atlas that provides crucial insights into how the blood and immune systems develop in the fetus. (2019-10-09)
Study finds prehistoric humans ate bone marrow like canned soup 400,000 years ago
Tel Aviv University researchers have uncovered evidence of the storage and delayed consumption of animal bone marrow at Qesem Cave near Tel Aviv. (2019-10-09)
Researchers discover critical process for how breast cancer spreads in bones
Researchers from the University of Notre Dame have identified a pair of proteins believed to be critical for spreading, or metastasizing, breast cancer to bone. (2019-10-07)
Treatment for 'low T' could someday come from a single skin cell, USC research shows
USC researchers have successfully grown human, testosterone-producing cells in the lab, paving the way to someday treat low testosterone with personalized replacement cells. (2019-10-07)
NIH researchers create new viral vector for improved gene therapy in sickle cell disease
Researchers at NIH have developed a new and improved viral vector -- a virus-based vehicle that delivers therapeutic genes -- for use in gene therapy for sickle cell disease. (2019-10-02)
Recommendations to prevent secondary fractures in adults 65+ with osteoporosis
A multistakeholder coalition assembled by the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) has issued clinical recommendations for the optimal prevention of secondary fracture among people aged 65 years and older with a hip or vertebral fracture -- the most serious complication associated with osteoporosis. (2019-10-02)
Mutant cells team up to make an even deadlier blood cancer
Two very different mutations have been identified as unexpected partners in crime for causing the blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (2019-10-02)
New species of parasite is identified in fatal case of visceral leishmaniasis
Phylogenomic analysis shows that pathogen isolated in Brazilian hospital does not belong to the genus Leishmania. (2019-10-01)
For the first time, UMD professor observes crystallized iron product, hemozoin, made in mammals
For the first time ever, a UMD professor has observed a crystallized iron product called hemozoin being made in mammals, with widespread implications for future research and treatment of blood disorders. (2019-10-01)
Emerging parasitic disease mimics the symptoms of visceral leishmaniasis in people
A new study suggests that transmission of a protozoan parasite from insects may also cause leishmaniasis-like symptoms in people. (2019-10-01)
Stem cell treatments for shoulder and elbow injuries flourish, but so far there's little evidence they work
Two critical reviews in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, published by Elsevier, examine the current status of biologic approaches for common shoulder and elbow problems. (2019-10-01)
How newly found tension sensor plays integral role in aligned chromosome partitioning
A Waseda University-led research found that oncogene SET/TAF1, which was found to be a proto-oncogene of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), contributes to proper chromosome partitioning as a tension sensor. (2019-09-30)
Preserving old bones with modern technology
A team of University of Colorado Boulder anthropologists is out to change the way that scientists study old bones damage-free. (2019-09-26)
First CAR T cell therapy targeting B cell-activating factor receptor eradicates blood cancers
The first CAR T cell therapy targeting the B cell-activating factor receptor on cancerous cells eradicated CD19-targeted therapy-resistant human leukemia and lymphoma cells in animal models, according to City of Hope research published today in Science Translational Medicine. (2019-09-25)
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