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Current Bonobos News and Events, Bonobos News Articles.
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For chimpanzees, salt and pepper hair not a marker of old age
Silver strands and graying hair is a sign of aging in humans, but things aren't so simple for our closest ape relatives--the chimpanzee. (2020-07-14)
In the wild, chimpanzees are more motivated to cooperate than bonobos
Scientists investigated cooperation dynamics in wild chimpanzees (Tai, Ivory Coast) and bonobos (LuiKotale, DCR) using a snake model. (2020-06-24)
Scientists made a single-cell-resolution map of brain genes in humans and other primates
A group of scientists led by Philipp Khaitovich, a professor at Skoltech, conducted a large-scale study of gene expression in 33 different brain regions of humans, chimpanzees, macaques and bonobos using the single-cell-resolution transcriptomics technologies and made a map of the different brain regions with their specific cell structures. (2020-06-04)
Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration
In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible. (2019-10-29)
Great apes have you on their mind
For decades a fierce debate was raised on whether any nonhuman species possess the ability of 'Theory of Mind'. (2019-09-30)
Sex for cooperation
To understand the origins of human sociality studying the social dynamics of our closest relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, is important. (2019-09-10)
NUS study reveals similarities in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo eye colour patterns
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have revealed that chimpanzees and bonobos share the contrasting colour pattern seen in human eyes, which makes it easy for them to detect the direction of someone's gaze from a distance. (2019-09-04)
First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. (2019-08-29)
Research reveals the link between primate knuckles and hand use
Research carried out by the University of Kent has found differences between the knuckle joints of primates that will enable a better understanding of ancient human hand use. (2019-05-29)
Bonobo moms play an active role in helping their sons find a mate
Many social animals share child-rearing duties, but research publishing May 20 in the journal Current Biology finds that bonobo moms go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. (2019-05-20)
Bonobo mothers help their sons to have more offspring
In many social animal species individuals share child-rearing duties, but new research from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, finds that bonobo mothers go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. (2019-05-20)
Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows
African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. (2019-04-30)
A surprise: Bonobos eat and share meat at rates similar to chimpanzees
Small forest antelope in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have more to worry about than being eaten by leopards. (2019-04-29)
Need for social skills helped shape modern human face
As large-brained, short-faced hominins, our faces are different from other, now extinct hominins (such as the Neanderthals) and our closest living relatives (bonobos and chimpanzees), but how and why did the modern human face evolve this way? (2019-04-15)
Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes -- watch what happens
Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. (2019-03-14)
Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps
An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. (2019-03-14)
Uncovering the evolution of the brain
What makes us human, and where does this mysterious property of 'humanness' come from? (2019-02-12)
Bonobo: great ape with a tiny voice
Although bonobos and chimpanzees are similar in size, bonobo calls sound an octave higher than chimpanzee calls. (2018-10-23)
Wild chimpanzees share food with their friends
Why share food with non-family members when there is no immediate gain? (2018-10-10)
Researchers gain insight into infant handling by young bonobos
University of Oregon anthropologist Klaree Boose followed her intuition about her observations of bonobos at a US zoo. (2018-06-19)
Bridging the gap between human and animal communication
Cooperative turn-taking has been suggested as an ancient mechanism of the language system bridging the existing gap between the articulate human species and our inarticulate primate cousins. (2018-06-05)
A sense of disgust in bonobos?
Kyoto University researchers investigate the adaptive system of disgust in bonobos to further understand the origins of it in humans. (2018-06-03)
'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apes
Muscles believed to be unique to humans have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held anthropocentric theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. (2018-05-23)
Bonobos share and share alike
Bonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. (2018-04-05)
Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share many meanings
If a bonobo and a chimpanzee were to meet face to face, they could probably understand each other's gestures. (2018-02-27)
Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share multiple meanings
Two closely related great ape species, the bonobo and chimpanzee, use gestures that share the same meaning researchers have found. (2018-02-27)
Unlike people, bonobos don't 'look for the helpers'
By the age of three months, human babies can already follow Mr. (2018-01-04)
Bonobos prefer jerks
Never trust anyone who is rude to a waiter, advice columnists say. (2018-01-04)
Penn study identifies new malaria parasites in wild bonobos
Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. (2017-11-21)
Bonobos help strangers without being asked
The impulse to be kind to strangers was long thought to be unique to humans, but research on bonobos suggests our species is not as exceptional in this regard as we like to think. (2017-11-07)
Humans imitate in unique ways: Comparing children and bonobos
A new study compared children's capacity to imitate behavior with the same capacity of humans' closest living great ape relatives, the bonobos. (2017-07-25)
In fathering, peace-loving bonobos don't spread the love
Bonobos have a reputation for being the peaceful, free-loving hippies of the primate world. (2017-07-10)
A new tool to decipher evolutionary biology
A new bioinformatics tool to compare genome data has been developed by teams from the Max F. (2017-05-09)
Study: Bonobos may be better representation of last common ancestor with humans
A new study examining the muscular system of bonobos provides firsthand evidence that the rare great ape species may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees. (2017-04-28)
Like people, great apes may distinguish between true and false beliefs in others
Great apes help a person access an object when that person thinks they knows where it is but is mistaken, according to a study published April 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Buttelmann from Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany, and colleagues. (2017-04-05)
Dogs, toddlers show similarities in social intelligence
University of Arizona researcher Evan MacLean, director of the Arizona Canine Cognition Center, found that dogs and 2-year-old children show similar patterns in social intelligence, much more so than human children and one of their closest relatives: chimpanzees. (2017-02-27)
New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered that a protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1. (2017-01-18)
Study sheds light on the function of the penis bone in male competition
A new UCL study examines how the baculum (penis bone) evolved in mammals and explores its possible function in primates and carnivores -- groups where many species have a baculum, but some do not. (2016-12-13)
Aging bonobos in the wild could use reading glasses too
As people age, they often find that it's more difficult to see things up close. (2016-11-07)
Genome sequencing reveals ancient interbreeding between chimpanzees and bonobos
For the first time, scientists have revealed ancient gene mixing between chimpanzees and bonobos, mankind's closest relatives, showing parallels with Neanderthal mixing in human ancestry. (2016-10-27)
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