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Current Brain activity News and Events, Brain activity News Articles.
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Excess weight among pregnant women may interfere with child's developing brain
Obesity in expectant mothers may hinder the development of the babies' brains as early as the second trimester, a new study finds. (2020-08-11)
Early neural activity associated with autism
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have found evidence of signature brain activity in infants that predicted ASD symptoms later at 18 months old. (2020-08-11)
Gulf war illness, chronic fatigue syndrome distinct illnesses, Georgetown study suggests
A brain imaging study of veterans with Gulf War illness (GWI) and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (sometimes called myalgic encephalomyelitis), has shown that the two illnesses produce distinctly different, abnormal patterns of brain activity after moderate exercise. (2020-08-10)
Brain activity during psychological stress may predict chest pain in people with heart disease
The brain's reaction to stress could be an important indicator of angina (chest pain) among people with known heart disease. (2020-08-10)
Math shows how brain stays stable amid internal noise and a widely varying world
A new theoretical framework shows that many properties of neural connections help biological circuits produce consistent computations. (2020-08-10)
The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party
The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows. (2020-08-10)
Individual differences in the brain
If selection reinforces a behavior, brain activities soon change as well. (2020-08-10)
Integration of gene regulatory networks in understanding animal behavior
For years, scientists have attributed animal behavior to the coordinated activities of neuronal cells and its circuits of neurons, known as the neuronal network (NN). (2020-08-07)
REM sleep tunes eating behavior
REM sleep tunes eating behavior. (2020-08-06)
Brain waves can be used to predict future pain sensitivity
Rhythms produced by the brain can reliably be used to predict how sensitive we are to pain, new research shows. (2020-08-06)
The bouncer in the brain
How do you keep orientation in a complex environment, like the city of Vienna? (2020-08-06)
Researchers discover sex-specific differences in neural mechanisms for glucose regulation
Researchers from Tufts have discovered neural mechanisms in mice specific to females that switch estrogen from playing a protective role in glucose metabolism to a disruptive role. (2020-08-06)
Placebos prove powerful even when people know they're taking one
A team of researchers from Michigan State University, University of Michigan and Dartmouth College is the first to demonstrate that placebos reduce brain markers of emotional distress even when people know they are taking one (2020-08-06)
Research suggests viability of brain computer to improve function in paralyzed patient
Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device called a stentrode brain-computer interface designed to improve functional independence in patients with severe paralysis. (2020-08-06)
Brain noise contains unique signature of dream sleep
Dream or REM sleep is distinguished by rapid eye movement and absence of muscle tone, but electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are indistinguishable from those of an awake brain. (2020-08-06)
Understanding why some children enjoy TV more than others
New research shows that children's own temperament could be driving the amount of TV they watch. (2020-08-05)
Body weight has surprising, alarming impact on brain function
Amsterdam and Costa Mesa, CA, August 5, 2020 - As a person's weight goes up, all regions of the brain go down in activity and blood flow, according to a new brain imaging study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-08-05)
Key brain region was 'recycled' as humans developed the ability to read
An MIT study offers evidence that the brain's inferotemporal cortex, which is specialized to perform object recognition, has been repurposed for a key component of reading called orthographic processing -- the ability to recognize written letters and words. (2020-08-04)
How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. (2020-08-04)
Speech processing hierarchy in the dog brain
Dog brains, just as human brains, process speech hierarchically: intonations at lower, word meanings at higher stages, according to a new study by Hungarian researchers. (2020-08-03)
Energy demands limit our brains' information processing capacity
Our brains have an upper limit on how much they can process at once due to a constant but limited energy supply, according to a new UCL study using a brain imaging method that measures cellular metabolism. (2020-08-03)
Study reveals less connectivity between hey brain regions in people with FXTAS premutation
Investigators from the University of Kansas were able to identify brain processes specifically linked to sensorimotor issues in aging people with the FMR1 premutation. (2020-08-03)
An averted glance gives a glimpse of the mind behind the eyes
Shakespeare once wrote that the ''eyes are the window to your soul.'' But scientists have found it challenging to peer into the brain to see how it derives meaning from a look into another's eyes. (2020-08-03)
Humans and flies employ very similar mechanisms for brain development and function
A new study led by researchers from King's College London has shown that humans, mice and flies share the same fundamental genetic mechanisms that regulate the formation and function of brain areas involved in attention and movement control. (2020-08-03)
Epilepsy: International researchers propose better seizure classification
A new ''mathematical language'' to classify seizures in epilepsy could lead to more effective clinical practice, researchers from Europe, the US, Australia and Japan propose in a new publication in eLife. (2020-07-31)
Your brain parasite isn't making you sick -- here's why
The new discovery could have important implications for brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune disorders. (2020-07-30)
A centerpiece of EBRAINS' human brain atlas is presented in 'Science'
'Julich-Brain' is the name of the first 3D-atlas of the human brain that reflects the variability of the brain's structure with microscopic resolution. (2020-07-30)
Trying to listen to the signal from neurons
Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a coaxial cable-inspired needle-electrode. (2020-07-29)
Arguments between couples: Our neurons like mediation
When couples argue, mediation improves the outcome of the confrontation. (2020-07-29)
Mental fatigue of multiple sclerosis linked to inefficient recruitment of neural resources
Results of the pilot study were consistent with prior research into brain activity in response to mental fatigue, according to Dr. (2020-07-28)
Your brain on birth control
Millions of women have been taking oral contraceptives, but little is known about whether the synthetic hormones found in the oral contraceptives have behavioural and neurophysiological effects, especially during puberty and early adolescence, which are critical periods of brain development. (2020-07-28)
Ultra-low power brain implants find meaningful signal in grey matter noise
By tuning into a subset of brain waves, University of Michigan researchers have dramatically reduced the power requirements of neural interfaces while improving their accuracy--a discovery that could lead to long-lasting brain implants that can both treat neurological diseases and enable mind-controlled prosthetics and machines. (2020-07-27)
Molecular cause underlying rare genetic disorder revealed
Scientists identify how a nonfunctioning CASK gene creates chaos in the brain. (2020-07-27)
Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)
Developing neural circuits linked to hunting behavior
Researchers demonstrated the relationship between improvements in zebrafish's hunting skills and the development of sensory coding in a part of the brain which responds to visual stimuli. (2020-07-23)
New approach simultaneously measures EEG and fMRI connectomes
Researchers have developed a new approach to compare changes in neural communication using electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging simultaneously. (2020-07-23)
Different from a computer: Why the brain never processes the same input in the same way
The brain never processes the same information in the same way. (2020-07-23)
Rely on gut feeling? New research identifies how second brain in gut communicates
You're faced with a big decision so your second brain provides what's normally referred to as 'gut instinct', but how did this sensation reach you before it was too late? (2020-07-23)
New role for white blood cells in the developing brain
Whether white blood cells can be found in the brain has been controversial, and their role there a complete mystery. (2020-07-22)
Brain builds and uses maps of social networks, physical space, in the same way
Even in these social-distanced days, we keep in our heads a map of our relationships with other people: family, friends, coworkers and how they relate to each other. (2020-07-22)
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