Current Brain damage News and Events

Current Brain damage News and Events, Brain damage News Articles.
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Survival protein may prevent collateral damage during cancer therapy
Australian researchers have identified a protein that could protect the kidneys from 'bystander' damage caused by cancer therapies. The 'cell survival protein', called BCL-XL, was required in laboratory models to keep kidney cells alive and functioning during exposure to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Kidney damage is a common side effect of these widely used cancer therapies, and the discovery has shed light on how this damage occurs at the molecular level. (2020-11-25)

Early trial hints CAR T cells may combat solid tumors in children with neuroblastoma
A phase 1 trial involving 12 children with relapsed neuroblastoma - a hard-to-treat pediatric cancer - shows that anticancer CAR T cells displayed signs of efficacy against these tumors while avoiding damage to nerve tissue. (2020-11-25)

High blood pressure in midlife is linked to increased brain damage in later life
Higher than normal blood pressure is linked to more extensive brain damage in the elderly, according to a new study published today in the European Heart Journal. In particular, the study found that there was a strong association between diastolic blood pressure (the blood pressure between heart beats) before the age of 50 and brain damage in later life, even if the diastolic blood pressure was within what is normally considered to be a healthy range. (2020-11-25)

Anxiety associated with faster Alzheimer's disease onset
Anxiety is associated with an increased rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-24)

Trinity researchers discover how the brain 're-wires' after disease
Trinity College researchers are studying how the brain re-wires itself in neurological disease. The team is building treatments for today's more common global conditions like Motor Neurone Disease (MND/ALS) and Spinal Muscular Atrophy and their findings could impact rehabilitation for patients, the discovery of effective drugs and quantifying the potential efficacy of new therapies. (2020-11-24)

Targeting calcium overload could improve stroke outcomes, research suggests
Excessive calcium contributes to harmful inflammation in ischemic stroke, and targeting it may provide doctors with a new way to improve patient outcomes. (2020-11-23)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

Severe infections wreak havoc on mouse blood cell production
Severe infections like malaria cause short and long-term damage to precursor blood cells in mice, but some damage could be reversed, find researchers. (2020-11-23)

Psychosis symptoms linked to impaired information spread in the brain
Altered white matter limits the brain's conscious access to information, potentially contributing to delusions and other psychotic symptoms of mental health disorders, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-23)

Diabetic eye disease associated with five-fold risk of severe COVID-19
People with diabetes and eye disease have a five-fold increased risk of requiring intubation when hospitalised with COVID-19. (2020-11-23)

AI helps scientists understand brain activity behind thoughts
Researchers have developed artificial intelligence (AI) models that help them better understand the brain computations that underlie thoughts. (2020-11-23)

Gut immune cells may help send MS into remission
An international research team led by UCSF scientists has shown, for the first time, that gut immune cells travel to the brain during multiple sclerosis (MS) flare-ups in patients. These gut cells seem to be playing a protective role, helping drive MS symptoms back into remission. (2020-11-20)

Risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1261, Yue Wu, Guoyue Zhang, Rong Hu and Jianlin Du from The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider the risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension. (2020-11-19)

Diabetes, hypertension may increase risk of COVID-19 brain complications
Some patients with COVID-19 are at higher risk of neurological complications like bleeding in the brain and stroke, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The researchers said these potentially life-threatening findings were more common in patients with hypertension and diabetes. (2020-11-18)

Early details of brain damage in COVID-19 patients
Looking at six patients using a specialized magnetic resonance technique, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that COVID-19 patients with neurological symptoms show some of the same metabolic disturbances in the brain as other patients who have suffered oxygen deprivation from other causes, but there are also notable differences. (2020-11-18)

The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers from the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases show in the journal Nature Neuroscience that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice than commonly assumed. (2020-11-17)

An acebuchin-oil-enriched diet helps to reduce hypertension
The acebuche, also know as the wild olive tree, is a variety of tree widely found throughout Spain and covering almost nine million hectares in Andalusia. However, little data is available on the composition and therapeutic potential of acebuchin oil. The studies mainly focus on the composition and pharmacological effects of olive tree leaves and extra virgin olive oil. (2020-11-17)

UV light may be a greater risk for melanoma than suspected
Studies conducted in yeast show that exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) induces new types of DNA damage that may cause the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma. While melanoma has been associated with UV light, this study directly links UV exposure to the atypical mutations known to spread the disease. The results also indicate that UV light can induce a more diverse spectrum of mutations than previously suspected. (2020-11-17)

Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-17)

Retinas: New potential clues in diagnosing, treating Alzheimer's
A study led by the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery has identified certain regions in the retina - the lining found in the back of the eye - that are more affected by Alzheimer's disease than other areas. The findings may help physicians predict changes in the brain as well as cognitive deterioration, even for patients experiencing the earliest signs of mild impairment. (2020-11-17)

Scientists discover new mechanism controlling brain size
International research headed by Danish Scientists has led to the discovery of a new mechanism that controls the size of our brains. The finding, which is based on studies on a rare congenital brain disease, delivers an important piece of data in our knowledge about how the human brain is formed during development. (2020-11-16)

Chronic alcohol use reshapes the brain's immune landscape, driving anxiety and addiction
Deep within the brain, a small almond-shaped region called the amygdala plays a vital role in how we exhibit emotion, behavior and motivation; it's also strongly implicated in alcohol abuse. Now, for the first time, a Scripps Research team has identified important changes to anti-inflammatory mechanisms and cellular activity in the amygdala that drive alcohol addiction. (2020-11-16)

First non-human primate study showing promise of gene therapy for stroke repair
Stroke is a leading cause of death and severe long-term disability with limited treatment available. A research team led by Prof. Gong Chen at Jinan University, Guangzhou, China recently reported the first non-human primate study demonstrating successful in vivo neural regeneration from brain internal glial cells for stroke repair. This work was published on Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology on November 5th, 2020. (2020-11-13)

Promising MS drug may worsen disease, research suggests
The drug has not yet made it to human trials for multiple sclerosis, but scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are urging their colleagues to move cautiously. (2020-11-13)

Neurons stripped of their identity are hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, study finds
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have identified new mechanisms in neurons that cause Alzheimer's disease. In particular, they discovered that changes in the structure of chromatin, the tightly coiled form of DNA, trigger neurons to lose their specialized function and revert to an earlier cell state. This results in the loss of synaptic connections, an effect associated with memory loss and dementia. (2020-11-13)

Worms reveal why melatonin promotes sleep
Melatonin is used as a dietary supplement to promote sleep and get over jet lag, but nobody really understands how it works in the brain. Now, researchers at UConn Health show that melatonin helps worms sleep, too, and they suspect they've identified what it does in us. (2020-11-13)

Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors
Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors. (2020-11-12)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Machine learning algorithm could provide Soldiers feedback
A new machine learning algorithm, developed with Army funding, can isolate patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior and then decode it, potentially providing Soldiers with behavioral-based feedback. (2020-11-12)

DNA repair supports brain cognitive development
Researchers at Osaka University showed that the enzyme PolĪ² functions in genome maintenance by preventing double-stranded breaks in DNA during brain development in mice. In mice lacking PolĪ², these breaks occurred during epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the developing hippocampus, peaking two weeks after birth. The increased breaks were associated with abnormal neuronal dendrites and poor memory ability. (2020-11-11)

Penn researchers develop approach to prevent toxicity tied to neurological gene therapy
Penn Medicine researchers have developed a new targeted approach to prevent a toxicity seen in the sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia after gene therapy to treat neurological disorders. It's an important hurdle to clear, as the field works toward more safe and effective gene therapies for patients with disorders like spinal muscular atrophy. (2020-11-11)

Potential brain damage marker could guide assessment and treatment of strokes
A team of researchers has discovered that a protein found in the nervous system can predict the severity of brain damage and long-term outcomes in patients who have suffered a stroke. (2020-11-11)

Protein in blood may predict prognosis, recovery from stroke
Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida and collaborators have found that a biomarker in the blood may determine the extent of brain injury from different types of strokes and predict prognosis in these patients. Their findings are reported in Science Translational Medicine. (2020-11-11)

Luddy researchers develop framework to study brain connectivity in living organisms
A new study by IU researchers lays out a large medical analytics framework that can be used in neuroscience and neurology to study brain connectivity in living organisms. (2020-11-11)

Fish give insight on sound sensitivity in autism
Scientists at The University of Queensland used zebrafish that carry the same genetic mutations as humans with Fragile X syndrome and autism, and discovered the neural networks and pathways that produce the hypersensitivities to sound in both species. (2020-11-10)

New study finds a link between sleep apnea and increased risk of dementia
A new study by Monash University has found that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been linked to an increased risk of dementia. (2020-11-10)

Researchers isolate and decode brain signal patterns for specific behaviors
A standing challenge has been isolating patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior, such as finger movements. Researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm that resolved this challenge by uncovering neural patterns missed by other methods. This could both enable new neuroscience discoveries and enhance future brain-machine interfaces. (2020-11-09)

Technique to regenerate optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment
Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. (2020-11-05)

The ebb and flow of brain ventricles
Enlarged ventricles in the brains of people with multiple sclerosis were previously considered a sign of tissue loss. But a team at the MDC and ECRC demonstrated that this expansion often recedes. A study published in JCI Insight now shows that the process observed in mice is transferable to humans. (2020-11-05)

How does the brain process fear?
CSHL Professor Bo Li's team explores the brain circuits that underlie fear. The researchers have mapped critical connections and teased out how specific components contribute to learning fear. They found a previously unknown link between fear learning and a movement control system. This research could lead to better treatments for people suffering from anxiety disorders. (2020-11-05)

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