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Current Brain injury News and Events

Current Brain injury News and Events, Brain injury News Articles.
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UTSA reduces seizures by removing newborn neurons
Epileptic seizures happen in one of every 10 people who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI). (2019-07-22)
Big data clarifies emotional circuit development
Several brain circuits that identify emotions are solidified early in development and include diverse regions beyond the amygdala, according to new research in children, adolescents, and young adults published in JNeurosci. (2019-07-22)
BU finds workplace injuries contribute to rise in suicide, overdose deaths
A new study finds that workplace injury significantly raises a person's risk of suicide or overdose death, contributing to a trend that has lowered US life expectancy in recent years. (2019-07-22)
Boosting the discovery of new drugs to treat spinal cord injuries using zebrafish
A research team led by Leonor Saúde, Principal Investigator at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, in partnership with the company Technophage, SA, has designed a simple and efficient platform that uses zebrafish to discover and identify new drugs to treat spinal cord lesions. (2019-07-19)
Deciphering brain somatic mutations associated with Alzheimer's disease
KAIST researchers have identified somatic mutations in the brain that could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). (2019-07-18)
Biomaterial-delivered chemotherapy leads to long-term survival in brain cancer
A combination of chemotherapy drugs during brain cancer surgery using a biodegradable paste, leads to long-term survival, researchers at the University of Nottingham have discovered. (2019-07-18)
CCNY physicists use mathematics to trace neuro transitions
Unique in its application of a mathematical model to understand how the brain transitions from consciousness to unconscious behavior, a study at The City College of New York's Benjamin Levich Institute for Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics may have just advanced neuroscience appreciably. (2019-07-18)
Self-injuring young girls overestimate negative feedback in social media simulation
Adolescent girls who self-injure feel that they receive more negative feedback than they actually receive, and are more sensitive to 'thumbs down' responses, compared to other adolescent girls. (2019-07-17)
Study pinpoints cell types affected in brains of multiple sclerosis patients
Scientists have discovered that a specific brain cell known as a 'projection neuron' has a central role to play in the brain changes seen in multiple sclerosis (MS). (2019-07-17)
Scientists identified the metabolic features specific to the autistic brain
Skoltech scientists looked into the differences in the concentrations of multiple metabolites in healthy humans and individuals suffering from Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), gaining a deeper insight into the molecular processes that take place in the brain of autistic individuals. (2019-07-16)
Risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease differ by sex
The abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brain is a biological marker for Alzheimer's disease, but the ways in which these proteins spread may help explain why the prevalence of Alzheimer's is higher in women than in men. (2019-07-16)
Novel therapy administered after TBI prevents brain damage
Could a therapy administered 30 minutes after a traumatic brain injury prevent damage that leads to seizures and other harmful effects? (2019-07-16)
Reducing seizures by removing newborn neurons
Removing new neurons born after a brain injury reduces seizures in mice, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2019-07-15)
Does use of headgear reduce the rate injuries in high school women's lacrosse?
Headgear worn during women's lacrosse practice and games can reduce the rate of head and face injuries as well as concussions, according to research presented by researchers in the Department of Orthopedics at the New York University Langone Health. (2019-07-14)
Athletes at a higher risk for ACL injury after return to sport
Young athletes who do not achieve a 90 percent score on a battery of tests that measure fitness to return to athletic competition, including quadricep strength, are at increased risk for a second knee injury, according to research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine. (2019-07-14)
Outcomes of non-operatively treated elbow ulnar in professional baseball players
Professional baseball players with a low-grade elbow injury that occurs on the humeral side of the elbow have a better chance of returning to throw and returning to play, and a lower risk of ulnar collateral ligament surgery than players who suffered more severe injuries on the ulnar side of the elbow. (2019-07-13)
Thwack! Insects feel chronic pain after injury
Scientists have known insects experience something like pain since 2003, but new research published today from Associate Professor Greg Neely and colleagues at the University of Sydney proves for the first time that insects also experience chronic pain that lasts long after an initial injury has healed. (2019-07-12)
Recognizing kidney injury due to burns is improved by artificial intelligence
Many burn victims suffer acute kidney injury, but early recognition of the condition can be challenging. (2019-07-12)
Scientific statement on predicting survival for cardiac arrest survivors
If a loved one has a heart attack that stops the heart, ends up in a coma, and the treating physician approaches you about taking the person off life support, would you trust that the physician knows when to make the call or how to judge that the person won't recover? (2019-07-11)
First step to induce self-repair in the central nervous system
Injured axons instruct Schwann cells to build specialized actin spheres to break down and remove axon fragments, thereby starting the regeneration process. (2019-07-11)
An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries
An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis. (2019-07-11)
REM sleep silences the siren of the brain
Something frightening or unpleasant does not go unnoticed. In our brain, the so-called limbic circuit of cells and connections immediately becomes active. (2019-07-11)
Area of brain linked to spatial awareness and planning also plays role in decision making
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view. (2019-07-11)
Study: New cars are safer, but women most likely to suffer injury
UVA's Center for Applied Biomechanics finds that seat-belted females are more vulnerable to injury in front-end car crashes than males. (2019-07-10)
Feinstein Institutes discovery may have implications for diabetes management and therapy
Feinstein Institutes discovery may have implications for diabetes management and therapy. (2019-07-10)
Insulin nasal spray may boost cognitive function in obese adolescents by improving connectivity
Researchers at the Modern Diet and Physiology Research Center and Department of Pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine are investigating whether insulin delivered directly to the brain by nasal inhalation can enhance communication between brain regions and improve cognition in adolescents with obesity and prediabetes. (2019-07-09)
Exercise improves brain function in overweight and obese individuals
New findings out of the University of Tübingen show that, on top of its benefits for metabolism, mood, and general health, exercise also improves brain function. (2019-07-09)
How the brain remembers where you're heading to
The brain appears to implement a GPS system for spatial navigation; however, it is not yet fully understood how it works. (2019-07-08)
Structure of brain networks is not fixed, study finds
The shape and connectivity of brain networks -- discrete areas of the brain that work together to perform complex cognitive tasks -- can change in fundamental and recurring ways over time, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2019-07-08)
After concussion, biomarkers in the blood may help predict recovery time
A study of high school and college football players suggests that biomarkers in the blood may have potential use in identifying which players are more likely to need a longer recovery time after concussion, according to a study published in the July 3, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-07-03)
Regenerating human retinal ganglion cells in the dish to inform glaucoma treatment
People have a limited ability to regenerate nerves after injury or illness. (2019-07-02)
Dose-dependent effects of esmolol-epinephrine combination therapy in myocardial ischemia
Animal studies on cardiac arrest found that a combination of epinephrine with esmolol attenuates post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction. (2019-07-02)
Study: Brain injury common in domestic violence
Domestic violence survivors commonly suffer repeated blows to the head and strangulation, trauma that has lasting effects that should be widely recognized by advocates, health care providers, law enforcement and others who are in a position to help, according to the authors of a new study. (2019-07-02)
Glowing brain cells illuminate stroke recovery research
A promising strategy for helping stroke patients recover, transplanting neural progenitor cells to restore lost functions, asks a lot of those cells. (2019-07-01)
CCNY experts in lateralization of speech publish discovery
City College of New York-led researchers have published a breakthrough in understanding previously unknown inner workings related to the lateralization of speech processing in the brain. (2019-07-01)
Technology allows researchers to see patients' real-time pain while in the clinic
Many patients, especially those who are anesthetized or emotionally challenged, cannot communicate precisely about their pain. (2019-06-27)
Injury more likely due to abuse when child was with male caregiver
The odds of child physical abuse vs. accidental injury increased substantially when the caregiver at the time of injury was male, according to a new study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. (2019-06-26)
Boosting amino acid derivative may be a treatment for schizophrenia
Many psychiatric drugs act on the receptors or transporters of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. (2019-06-26)
Is multiple sclerosis linked to childhood viral infections?
The exact causes of multiple sclerosis still remain unknown. In a mouse model of the disease, researchers (UNIGE) studied the potential link between transient cerebral viral infections in childhood and the development of this cerebral autoimmune disease later in life. (2019-06-26)
How to help patients recover after a stroke
The existing approach to brain stimulation for rehabilitation after a stroke does not take into account the diversity of lesions and the individual characteristics of patients' brains. (2019-06-26)
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