Current Brain tumour News and Events

Current Brain tumour News and Events, Brain tumour News Articles.
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New immunotherapy shows promise against rare childhood cancer
A novel CAR T-cell therapy developed by researchers at UCL and designed to target cancerous tumours, has shown promising early results in children with neuroblastoma, a rare form of childhood cancer. (2020-11-25)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

Better survival among women after lung cancer surgery
There are known differences in the survival rates of women and men with lung cancer. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden set out to investigate potential reasons behind this disparity, such as the presence of other underlying diseases and smoking status. The study, which was published in Chest, shows that women have better survival rates after lung cancer surgery than men, independent of other factors. (2020-11-23)

Psychosis symptoms linked to impaired information spread in the brain
Altered white matter limits the brain's conscious access to information, potentially contributing to delusions and other psychotic symptoms of mental health disorders, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-23)

New type of immunotherapy may pave the way for better cancer treatments
Immunotherapy for cancer has made great advances and many patients can now receive effective treatments that were not available ten years ago. However, there are certain types of cancer that do not respond to existing immunotherapy. A study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reports on a new kind of immunotherapy that gives hope of more treatment options for cancer in the future. (2020-11-23)

AI helps scientists understand brain activity behind thoughts
Researchers have developed artificial intelligence (AI) models that help them better understand the brain computations that underlie thoughts. (2020-11-23)

Prostate cancer: CRYM protein inhibits tumour growth
Prostate cancer is caused by elevated hormone levels, and tumours are generally treated using hormone therapy. A research team headed by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna in collaboration with David Heery from the University of Nottingham/UK and Sarka Pospisilova and Suzanne Turner of the University of Brno/Czech Republic have shown that the protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) plays a significant part in tumour growth. The higher the levels of this protein that are present, the better the prognosis. (2020-11-18)

Brain protein could be starting point for new treatments for pancreatic cancer
Researchers have discovered that a protein thought to only be involved in the development of neurons in the brain also plays a major role in the development and growth of pancreatic cancer. Their findings demonstrate for the first time how the protein, called Netrin-G1, helps pancreatic cancer cells survive by protecting them from the immune system and supplying them with nutrients. (2020-11-18)

Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-17)

Breakthrough in childhood brain cancer will save lives
A scientific breakthrough has enabled experts to predict relapse in a common childhood cancer and means doctors can tailor treatment for each individual child and improve prognosis. (2020-11-17)

Scientists discover new mechanism controlling brain size
International research headed by Danish Scientists has led to the discovery of a new mechanism that controls the size of our brains. The finding, which is based on studies on a rare congenital brain disease, delivers an important piece of data in our knowledge about how the human brain is formed during development. (2020-11-16)

A new diagnostic method predicts which cancer patients will respond to immunothe
An international group led by Dr Banafshe Larijani, an Ikerbasque researcher seconded to the Biofisika Institute (UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, CSIC), has developed a new diagnostic method making it possible to accurately predict which cancer patients will respond positively to immunotherapy. This method will allow oncologists to tailor treatment to each patient and avoid therapies that are not going to be successful. (2020-11-16)

Worms reveal why melatonin promotes sleep
Melatonin is used as a dietary supplement to promote sleep and get over jet lag, but nobody really understands how it works in the brain. Now, researchers at UConn Health show that melatonin helps worms sleep, too, and they suspect they've identified what it does in us. (2020-11-13)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Machine learning algorithm could provide Soldiers feedback
A new machine learning algorithm, developed with Army funding, can isolate patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior and then decode it, potentially providing Soldiers with behavioral-based feedback. (2020-11-12)

Predicting the risk of severe side effects of cancer treatment
The risk of serious adverse effects on the blood status and bone marrow of patients during chemotherapy can be predicted by a model developed at Linköping University, Sweden. This research may make it possible to use genetic analysis to identify patients with a high probability of side effects. The study has been published in npj Systems Biology and Applications. (2020-11-12)

Animation reveals secrets of critical tumour protein
The latest animation technology has revealed the molecular detail of how our bodies are protected from cancer by a key 'tumour suppressor' protein called p53. (2020-11-11)

Luddy researchers develop framework to study brain connectivity in living organisms
A new study by IU researchers lays out a large medical analytics framework that can be used in neuroscience and neurology to study brain connectivity in living organisms. (2020-11-11)

Is proton therapy the silver bullet for children with brain cancer?
How safe is proton therapy for children with brain cancer compared to the conventional x-ray radiation delivered post-surgery? (2020-11-11)

Fish give insight on sound sensitivity in autism
Scientists at The University of Queensland used zebrafish that carry the same genetic mutations as humans with Fragile X syndrome and autism, and discovered the neural networks and pathways that produce the hypersensitivities to sound in both species. (2020-11-10)

Shedding new light on the origin of metastases
Before an effective treatment can be devised, we have to be able to understand the specific effect of an anti-cancer substance on the cell type that produces metastases in the cellular heterogeneity of tumours. A team from the University of Geneva used spiked-scRNAseq that links the transcriptomic to single cell metastatic phenotypes of colon cancer tumour cells. The importance of the VSIG1 gene involved in intercellular interactions has been identified: it prevents metastases. (2020-11-10)

As cancer has evolved, it is time for cancer research to do the same
Marking Lung Cancer Awareness month, a new study investigates the extent to which human-based, non-animal approaches are supplanting animal models in cancer research - comparing number of publications, funding, and publications associated with clinical trials between xenograft models and human organoids. The analysis reveals limited support for human biology-based methods and the authors recommend encouraging efforts to reduce reliance on animal testing in order to accelerate discovery and development of new, effective and affordable medicines. (2020-11-10)

New study finds a link between sleep apnea and increased risk of dementia
A new study by Monash University has found that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been linked to an increased risk of dementia. (2020-11-10)

New method developed by Lithuanian scientists can reach 90% accuracy in detecting melanoma
A team of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences proposed a non-invasive method for detection of melanoma. A patented computer-aided diagnostic system developed by Lithuanian scientists proved to be more than 90% accurate in detecting malignancy in diagnostic images of skin lesions acquired from 100 patients. (2020-11-09)

Researchers isolate and decode brain signal patterns for specific behaviors
A standing challenge has been isolating patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior, such as finger movements. Researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm that resolved this challenge by uncovering neural patterns missed by other methods. This could both enable new neuroscience discoveries and enhance future brain-machine interfaces. (2020-11-09)

Anti-depressant repurposed to treat childhood cancer
A new study has found that a commonly prescribed anti-depressant may halt growth of a type of cancer known as childhood sarcoma, at least in mice and laboratory cell experiments. The findings, from researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and MD Anderson Cancer Centre in Texas, ignite hope of novel treatment strategies against this disease. The study is published in the journal Cancer Research. (2020-11-06)

Cancer researchers train white blood cells to attacks tumor cells
Scientists at the National Center for Tumor Diseases Dresden (NCT/UCC) and Dresden University Medicine, together with an international team of researchers, were able to demonstrate that certain white blood cells, so-called neutrophil granulocytes, can potentially - after completing a special training program -- be utilized for the treatment of tumors. The scientists published their results in the renowned specialist journal Cell. (2020-11-06)

Staying in touch!
New mechanism regulating the adhesion of cells to the surrounding extracellular support structures discovered at the University of Konstanz - New options for the treatment of inflammatory processes and tumour metastasis (2020-11-06)

How does the brain process fear?
CSHL Professor Bo Li's team explores the brain circuits that underlie fear. The researchers have mapped critical connections and teased out how specific components contribute to learning fear. They found a previously unknown link between fear learning and a movement control system. This research could lead to better treatments for people suffering from anxiety disorders. (2020-11-05)

New multiscale view of the human brain
Researchers from University of Barcelona study how multilayers that form the human brain interact at different resolutions (2020-11-04)

New method shows great potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease
In Alzheimer's disease, a protein (peptide) forms clumps in the brain and causes sufferers to lose their memory. In a recently published article, a research group at Uppsala University described a new treatment method that increases the body's own degradation of the building blocks that lead to these protein clumps. (2020-11-03)

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age 2
A study by UNC researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage. (2020-10-30)

Graphene-based memory resistors show promise for brain-based computing
As progress in traditional computing slows, new forms of computing are coming to the forefront. At Penn State, a team of engineers is attempting to pioneer a type of computing that mimics the efficiency of the brain's neural networks while exploiting the brain's analog nature. (2020-10-29)

Brainstem neurons control both behaviour and misbehaviour
A recent study at the University of Helsinki reveals how gene control mechanisms define the identity of developing neurons in the brainstem. The researchers also showed that a failure in differentiation of the brainstem neurons leads to behavioural abnormalities, including hyperactivity and attention deficit. (2020-10-29)

New assay screens human brain organoids, doubles known candidate genes for microcephaly
A new tissue screening assay for human cerebral organoids identified 25 additional candidate genes for microcephaly, nearly doubling the number of currently known genes linked to the rare neurological condition. (2020-10-29)

New imaging technique doubles visibility of brain tumors in scans
A new three-dimensional imaging technique has been developed that greatly improves the visibility of brain tumors in magnetic resonance imaging scans. The technique will potentially enable earlier diagnosis of tumors when they are smaller and more treatable. (2020-10-28)

Cerebrospinal fluid as liquid biopsy for characterizing & policing of medulloblastoma
Building on previous research led by Joan Seoane, Director of Translational Research at the Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) and ICREA Research Professor, latest findings from a proof-of-concept study published in Nature Communications, show that the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), allows for the more precise characterization, molecular diagnosis (including subtyping and risk stratification), and real time tracking of medulloblastoma (MB) - the most prevalent malignant brain tumor in childhood. (2020-10-27)

Cancer cells mediate immune suppression in the brain
Notre Dame researchers showed that one type of cell important for immunity, called a myeloid cell, can suppress the immune response -- which has the effect of allowing breast cancer cells to metastasize to the brain to form secondary tumor cells there. (2020-10-27)

What EEGs tell us about COVID-19 and the brain
A systematic review of hundreds of cases of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 helps painting a broader picture of how COVID-19 affects the brain. (2020-10-27)

Hydrogen sulfide helps maintain your drive to breathe
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that the production of hydrogen sulfide gas is necessary to breathe normally. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide production in rats prevented brain neurons that control breathing from functioning normally. These findings have identified new mediators of breathing that can now be explored in the context of human health and disease. (2020-10-26)

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