Nav: Home

Current Brain News and Events

Current Brain News and Events, Brain News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Even in young adults, blood pressure above normal may be linked to brain shrinkage
For people in their 20s and 30s, having blood pressure above normal but below the level considered to be high blood pressure, may be linked to loss of brain volume, according to a study published in the January 23, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-01-23)
Fralin Biomedical Research Institute scientists link concussions to epilepsy development
Experiments by Fralin Biomedical Research Institute scientists show a strong relationship between changes in astrocytes after mild traumatic brain injury and the eventual occurrence of a seizure. (2019-01-22)
How concussions may lead to epilepsy
Researchers have identified a cellular response to repeated concussions that may contribute to seizures in mice like those observed following traumatic brain injury in humans. (2019-01-21)
How our brains distinguish between self-touch and touch by others
Our brains seem to reduce sensory perception from an area of our skin when we touch it ourselves, according to a new study from Linköping University, Sweden, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS. (2019-01-21)
Nerve growth factor: Early studies and recent clinical trials
NGF is the first discovered member of a family of neurotrophic factors, collectively indicated as neurotrophins, (which include brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin 4/5). (2019-01-18)
Findings on eye-signal blending re-examines Nobel-winning research
Knowing precisely where the signals meet and the brain processes them is vital to treating amblyopia, or reduced vision in one eye because the brain and eye aren't working together properly. (2019-01-17)
The cerebellum's hidden roles in social and reward-driven behavior
The cerebellum may regulate sociability and reward-driven behavior by controlling the release of dopamine, according to a new study. (2019-01-17)
Teen brain volume changes with small amount of cannabis use, study finds
At a time when several states are moving to legalize recreational use of marijuana, new research shows that concerns about the drug's impact on teens may be warranted. (2019-01-14)
Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains
A team at LSTM with their collaborators in Malawi and Denmark have provided, for the first time, evidence which links the ability of red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite to bind to the cells lining the blood vessels of the brain, with the clinical syndrome cerebral malaria. (2019-01-11)
Early development of memory for space and time
By observing how newborn rats first navigate and begin to remember the environments they are born into, researchers have gained new insight into how brains develop the ability to turn experiences into memory. (2019-01-10)
Study: Excessive body fat around the middle linked to smaller brain size
Carrying extra body fat, especially around the middle, may be linked to brain shrinkage, according to a study published in the Jan. (2019-01-09)
NUS scientists harness machine learning to uncover new insights into the human brain
An inter-disciplinary research team led by the National University of Singapore has successfully employed machine learning to uncover new insights into the cellular architecture of the human brain. (2019-01-09)
Technique boosts omega 3 fatty acid levels in brain 100 fold
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago report that adding a lysophospholipid form of EPA (LPC-EPA) to the diet can increase levels of EPA in the brain 100-fold in mice. (2019-01-08)
Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed
Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study from the University of Washington. (2019-01-07)
Map of neuronal pathways of the mammalian cerebral cortex and their evolution
Using our in utero electroporation technique for ferrets, we investigated the axonal fibers in the developing cerebral cortex, where ferrets have two fiber layers; the inner axonal fiber layer projects contralaterally and subcortically, whereas the outer fiber layer sends axons to neighboring cortical areas. (2018-12-19)
Computer hardware designed for 3D games could hold the key to replicating human brain
Researchers at the University of Sussex have created the fastest and most energy efficient simulation of part of a rat brain using off-the-shelf computer hardware. (2018-12-19)
How the brain reacts to loss of vision
If mice lose their vision immediately after birth due to a genetic defect, this has a considerable impact, both on the organisation of the cerebral cortex and on memory ability. (2018-12-19)
Peering into Little Foot's 3.67 million-year-old brain
MicroCT scans of the Australopithecus fossil known as Little Foot shows that the brain of this ancient human relative was small and shows features that are similar to our own brain and others that are closer to our ancestor shared with living chimpanzees. (2018-12-18)
The role of lipid nanoparticles and its surface modification in reaching the brain
Nanomedicine is a field of science that employs materials in the nanometer scale.Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common disorders worldwide, becoming a serious economic burden and public health problem.In this review, we have highlighted the potential of lipid nanoparticles in reaching the brain, a challenging task in modern medicine. (2018-12-14)
Mapping technique to reassess Alzheimer's studies finds improved reproducibility
A neural mapping approach that pegs results from more than two dozen previous Alzheimer's studies found that reproducibility improves when trying to isolate symptoms to a brain network rather than a single area of the brain. (2018-12-14)
USC researchers discover abundant source for neuronal cells
USC researchers seeking a way to study genetic activity associated with psychiatric disorders have discovered an abundant source of human cells -- the nose. (2018-12-13)
Study shows in older people, type 2 diabetes is associated with a decline in brain function over 5 years
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that in older people living in the community, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a decline in verbal memory and fluency over five years. (2018-12-13)
How bullying affects the brain
The effects of constantly being bullied are more than just psychological. (2018-12-12)
An intellectually active lifestyle protects against neurodegeneration in Huntington's
Researchers from IDIBELL and the University of Barcelona (UB), in collaboration with several hospitals, have discovered that an intellectually active lifestyle confers protection against neurodegeneration in people with Huntington's disease, delaying the onset of symptoms and loss of grey matter in the brain. (2018-12-12)
Resting easy: Oxygen promotes deep, restorative sleep, study shows
Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study by University of Alberta neuroscientists. (2018-12-12)
Attention training improves intelligence and functioning of children's brain
the study shows that the beneficial effects of training in the brain and intelligence are greater when an educator implement a coaching strategy design in order to help the child to understand their training process (2018-12-11)
Brain activity shows development of visual sensitivity in autism
Research investigating how the brain responds to visual patterns in people with autism has shown that sensory responses change between childhood and adulthood. (2018-12-11)
Two compounds in coffee may team up to fight Parkinson's
Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia -- two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration. (2018-12-10)
Brainwaves suppress obvious ideas to help us think more creatively
The human brain needs to suppress obvious ideas in order to reach the most creative ones, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Goldsmiths, University of London. (2018-12-10)
Computers can 'spot the difference' between healthy brains and the brains of people with DID
Machine-learning and neuroimaging techniques have been used to accurately distinguish between individuals with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) and healthy individuals, on the basis of their brain structure, in new research part funded by the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre and published in The British Journal of Psychiatry. (2018-12-06)
Whole-brain imaging of mice during behavior
In a study published in Neuron, Emilie Macé from Botond Roska's group and collaborators demonstrate how functional ultrasound imaging can yield high-resolution, brain-wide activity maps of mice for specific behaviors. (2018-12-05)
Mountain splendor? Scientists know where your eyes will look
Using precise brain measurements, Yale researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars. (2018-12-04)
Study reveals new information about infant brain structure
Infant brain development is still poorly understood. Thus, research on the topic is vital as developing brains are sensitive to early environmental factors. (2018-11-30)
Effective new target for mood-boosting brain stimulation found
Researchers have found an effective target in the brain for electrical stimulation to improve mood in people suffering from depression. (2018-11-29)
Stop -- hey, what's that sound?
In a new study, researchers were able to see where in the brain, and how quickly -- in milliseconds -- the brain's neurons transition from processing the sound of speech to processing the language-based words of the speech. (2018-11-29)
Clinical study shows Cereset technology reduces symptoms of PTSD in military personnel
A new clinical study conducted by Wake Forest School of Medicine shows that use of a new non-invasive technology from the creators of Cereset not only reduces symptoms of military-related traumatic stress but also improves brain function. (2018-11-21)
Low-protein high-carb diet shows promise for healthy brain aging
Low-protein high-carbohydrate diets may be the key to longevity, and healthy brain ageing in particular, according to a new mice study from the University of Sydney. (2018-11-20)
Debate: Is the gut or the brain more important in regulating appetite and metabolism?
Whether gut or brain hormones are more important for the regulation of appetite and metabolism is not clearly defined. (2018-11-18)
UCLA cell study reveals how head injuries lead to serious brain diseases
UCLA biologists reveal the hidden molecular basis of brain disorders and provide the first cell atlas of the hippocampus -- the part of the brain that helps regulate learning and memory -- as it is affected by traumatic brain injury. (2018-11-16)
Dynamic audiovisuals increase spectator attention, but inhibits conscious processing
According to a study conducted by the UAB and the UPO, scene changes diminish a spectator's blink rate, producing an increase in attention. (2018-11-12)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Approaching With Kindness
We often forget to say the words "thank you." But can those two words change how you — and those around you — look at the world? This hour, TED speakers on the power of gratitude and appreciation. Guests include author AJ Jacobs, author and former baseball player Mike Robbins, Dr. Laura Trice, Professor of Management Christine Porath, and former Danish politician Özlem Cekic.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#509 Anisogamy: The Beginning of Male and Female
This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We'll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we'll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs.