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Current Brain News and Events, Brain News Articles.
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No association found between exposure to mobile devices and brain volume alterations in adolescents
New study of 2,500 Dutch children is the first to explore the relationship between brain volume and different doses of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (2020-07-09)
How fear transforms into anxiety
University of New Mexico researchers identify for the first time the brain-wide neural correlates of the transition from fear to anxiety. (2020-07-09)
Feeling with the heart
A person's sensitivity to external stimuli depends not only on the state of their nervous system, but also on their cardiac cycle. (2020-07-09)
A memory game could help us understand brain injury
A Boston University team created a memory game for mice in order to examine the function of two different brain areas that process information about the sensation of touch and the memory of previous events. (2020-07-09)
UBC research shows hearing persists at end of life
Hearing is widely thought to be the last sense to go in the dying process. (2020-07-08)
COVID-19 brain complications found across the globe
Cases of brain complications linked to COVID-19 are occurring across the globe, a new review by University of Liverpool researchers has shown. (2020-07-08)
Neurobiology -- How much oxygen does the brain need?
The brain has a high energy demand and reacts very sensitively to oxygen deficiency. (2020-07-06)
How does spatial multi-scaled chimera state produce the diversity of brain rhythms?
This work revealed that the real brain network has a new chimera state -- spatial multi-scaled chimera state, and its formation is closely related the local symmetry of connections. (2020-07-03)
Center for BrainHealth advances understanding of brain connectivity in cannabis users
Center for BrainHealth® recently examined underlying brain networks in long-term cannabis users to identify patterns of brain connectivity when the users crave or have a desire to consume cannabis. (2020-07-02)
Abnormal proteins in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's Disease
A new study published in The Journal of Physiology has shown that misfolded protein build-up in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice. (2020-07-02)
Brain activity prior to an action contributes to our sense of control over what we do
Scientists have identified specific brain regions that contribute to humans' sense of agency - the implicit sense that we control our actions and that they affect the outside world. (2020-07-01)
Does deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's increase risk of dementia?
There's good news for people with Parkinson's disease. A new study shows that deep brain stimulation may not increase the risk of developing dementia. (2020-07-01)
Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington's and other diseases
Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. (2020-06-30)
Lab-grown 'mini-brains' suggest COVID-19 virus can infect human brain cells
A multidisciplinary team from two Johns Hopkins University institutions, including neurotoxicologists and virologists from the Bloomberg School of Public Health and infectious disease specialists from the school of medicine, has found that organoids known as ''mini-brains'' can be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-06-30)
It's not just Alzheimer's disease: Sanders-Brown research highlights form of dementia
The long-running study on aging and brain health at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer's Disease Center has once again resulted in important new findings -- highlighting a complex and under-recognized form of dementia. (2020-06-26)
Faulty brain processing of new information underlies psychotic delusions, finds new research
Problems in how the brain recognizes and processes novel information lie at the root of psychosis, researchers have found. (2020-06-23)
The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds
The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience. (2020-06-22)
JHU: A man who can't see numbers provides new insight into awareness
By studying an individual with an extremely rare brain anomaly that prevents him from seeing certain numbers, Johns Hopkins University researchers provided new evidence that a robust brain response to something like a face or a word does not mean a person is aware of it. (2020-06-22)
The brain's functional organization slows down following a relationship breakup
During a person's life, the experience of a stressful life event can lead to the development of depressive symptoms, even in a non-clinical population. (2020-06-19)
A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information. (2020-06-17)
A Neandertal from Chagyrskaya Cave
Until now, only the genomes of two Neandertals have been sequenced to high quality: one from Vindjia Cave in modern-day Croatia and one from Denisova Cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains. (2020-06-17)
Brain research sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of depression
A new study conducted in Turku, Finland, reveals how symptoms indicating depression and anxiety are linked to brain function changes already in healthy individuals. (2020-06-16)
Brothers in arms: The brain and its blood vessels
The brain and its surrounding blood vessels exist in a close relationship. (2020-06-15)
Loneliness alters your brain's social network
Social media sites aren't the only things that keep track of your social network -- your brain does, too. (2020-06-15)
Your brain shows if you are lonely or not
Social connection with others is critical to a person's mental and physical well-being. (2020-06-15)
Inhibitory interneurons in hippocampus excite the developing brain
A new study from the George Washington University, however, reports that in some critical structures of the developing brain, the inhibitory neurons cause excitation rather than suppression of brain activity. (2020-06-12)
High doses of ketamine can temporarily switch off the brain, say researchers
Researchers have identified two brain phenomena that may explain some of the side-effects of ketamine. (2020-06-11)
The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text
The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing. (2020-06-11)
Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links
Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail. (2020-06-11)
Yale researchers find potential treatment for Rett Syndrome
An experimental cancer drug can extend the life of mice with Rett Syndrome, a devastating genetic disorder that afflicts about one of every 10,000 to 15,000 girls within 6 to 18 months after birth, Yale researchers report June 10 in the journal Molecular Cell. (2020-06-10)
Unravelling complex brain networks with automated 3D neural mapping
KAIST researchers developed a new algorithm for brain imaging data analysis that enables the precise and quantitative mapping of complex neural circuits onto a standardized 3D reference atlas. (2020-06-08)
Wearable brain scanner technology expanded for whole head imaging
A new type of wearable brain scanner is revealing new possibilities for understanding and diagnosing mental illness after the technology has been expanded to scan the whole brain with millimeter accuracy. (2020-06-05)
Psychedelic drug psilocybin tamps down brain's ego center
Perhaps no region of the brain is more fittingly named than the claustrum, taken from the Latin word for 'hidden or shut away.' The claustrum is an extremely thin sheet of neurons deep within the cortex, yet it reaches out to every other region of the brain. (2020-06-05)
NMDA receptors may link psychosis and sleep deficits
Sofya Kulikova, a researcher at HSE University in Perm, is part of an international research team that has discovered potential mechanisms that explain the sleep spindle deficit in electroencephalograms (EEG) of people with schizophrenia. (2020-06-05)
Scientists discover that nicotine promotes spread of lung cancer to the brain
Among people who have the most common type of lung cancer, up to 40% develop metastatic brain tumors, with an average survival time of less than six months. (2020-06-04)
New study reveals areas of brain where recognition and identification occur
Using ''sub-millimeter'' brain implants, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), have been able to determine which parts of the brain are linked to facial and scene recognition. (2020-06-04)
Scientists made a single-cell-resolution map of brain genes in humans and other primates
A group of scientists led by Philipp Khaitovich, a professor at Skoltech, conducted a large-scale study of gene expression in 33 different brain regions of humans, chimpanzees, macaques and bonobos using the single-cell-resolution transcriptomics technologies and made a map of the different brain regions with their specific cell structures. (2020-06-04)
Largest ever study of radiosurgery for brain metastases from small cell lung cancer
The international First-line Radiosurgery for Small-Cell Lung Cancer (FIRE-SCLC) analysis led by University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers and published today in JAMA Oncology shows no overall survival benefit with whole-brain radiation therapy compared with radiosurgery in patients with small cell lung cancer. (2020-06-04)
Understanding the role of cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in brain health
Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that brain chemistry is sensitive to fitness and body composition. (2020-06-02)
Female college students more affected academically by high alcohol use than men
Female college students appear to be more affected by high alcohol use than men, which may lead to less interest in academics, according to new research including by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-06-01)
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