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Current Bronze age News and Events

Current Bronze age News and Events, Bronze age News Articles.
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Bronze Age herders were less mobile than previously thought
Bronze Age pastoralists in what is now southern Russia apparently covered shorter distances than previously thought. (2020-10-21)
Mammography screening saves lives also in older age
Mammography, which is an x-ray picture of the breast, is efficient also for women over the age of 70. (2020-10-20)
New blood test predicts which COVID-19 patients will develop severe infection
Scientists have developed, for the first time, a score that can accurately predict which patients will develop a severe form of Covid-19. (2020-10-14)
Gold- and bronze-like paints that don't contain metal
Lustrous metallic paints are used to enhance the beauty of many products, such as home decorations, cars and artwork. (2020-10-14)
Age does not contribute to COVID-19 susceptibility
Scientists have estimated that the age of an individual does not indicate how likely they are to be infected by SARS-CoV-2. (2020-10-12)
Olympic athletes should be mindful of their biological clocks
Biological clocks have sizeable effects on the performance of elite athletes. (2020-10-08)
Anglo-Saxon warlord found by detectorists could redraw map of post-Roman Britain
A discovery by a metal detectorist on club outing proved to be a significant burial with the remains of an imposing warlord, along with well-preserved weapons and items. (2020-10-04)
Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found. (2020-09-28)
Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
Traces of violence on 1700 year old skeletons allow researchers to reconstruct warfare and sacrifices of nomads in Siberia. (2020-09-18)
Blonde Scandinavians or well-travelled Southern Europeans? Research busts myths of Vikings
Our notion of the Scandinavian Viking very likely stems from films rather than history. (2020-09-16)
Domestic horses probably did not originate in Anatolia
Domestic horses likely did not originate in Anatolia as previously suspected, according to a new study of ancient horse remains dating as far back as 9000 BCE. (2020-09-16)
Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age
Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-09-10)
New dating of Nebra sky disk
Until now the Nebra sky disk was deemed to be from the Early Bronze Age and therefore the world's oldest depiction of the cosmos. (2020-09-03)
New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. (2020-09-03)
Study reveals lactose tolerance happened quickly in Europe
A new study published in Current Biology reveals that the ability for humans to digest milk (lactase persistence) spread through Central Europe quickly in evolutionary terms. (2020-09-03)
Lactose tolerance spread throughout Europe in only a few thousand years
The human ability to digest the milk sugar lactose after infancy spread throughout Central Europe in only a few thousand years. (2020-09-03)
RCSI research finds air pollution in Ireland associated with strokes
Scientists have found that air pollution in the winter is associated with more hospitalisations for all strokes in Dublin. (2020-08-11)
POSTECH solves the durability issue of hydrogen cars
Professor Yong-Tae Kim's research team improves the durability of automotive fuel cells through selective electro-catalysis. (2020-07-13)
Age discrimination laws don't protect older women as they do older men
Older women in the workforce should be considered collectively as a unique demographic group that includes both gender and age if they're to receive adequate protection against workplace discrimination, according to a new paper published by a University at Buffalo economist. (2020-06-18)
RCSI researchers find potential new way to improve treatment for common bleeding disorder
Scientists have found a potential new way to promote blood clotting that could be used to help develop treatments for Von Willebrand Disease, the most common genetic bleeding disorder. (2020-06-11)
Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links
Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail. (2020-06-11)
How is a metal formed?
Metal is characterized by free electrons which give rise to its high electric conductivity. (2020-06-05)
Age affects decisions related to breast cancer surgery
A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that breast cancer surgery is safe for patients who are older than 70 years of age, but age can influence the decision to undergo surgery. (2020-06-03)
Ancient genomes link subsistence change and human migration in northern China
Northern China is among the first centers in the world where agriculture developed, but its genetic history remains largely unknown. (2020-06-01)
Scientists develop sorbent for purifying water from radioactive elements
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Institute of Chemistry FEB RAS come up with a smart technology for the synthesis of sorbent based on a ''tungsten bronze'' compound powder (Na2WO4) aimed to purify industrial and drinking water from hazardous radionuclides cesium (137Cs), and strontium (90Sr), as well as for effective processing of liquid radioactive waste. (2020-05-29)
Public option would lower health premiums, but not greatly expand coverage
State and federal lawmakers have expressed interest in creating a public health insurance option, with four different bills that would create a federal public option being introduced in the Congress in 2019. (2020-05-28)
Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes
The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant -- which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria -- during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites. (2020-05-28)
Human mobility and Western Asia's early state-level societies
The regions of Anatolia, the Northern Levant and the Caucasus played important roles in the development of complex social and cultural models during the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age. (2020-05-28)
Material and genetic resemblance in the Bronze Age Southern Levant
Different 'Canaanite' people from the Bronze Age Southern Levant not only culturally, but also genetically resemble each other more than other populations. (2020-05-28)
7,000 years of demographic history in France
A team led by scientists from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/Université de Paris)1 have shown that French prehistory was punctuated by two waves of migration: the first during the Neolithic period, about 6,300 years ago, the second during the Bronze Age, about 4,200 years ago. (2020-05-25)
First ancient cultivated rice discovered in Central Asia
Rice has always been one of the most important food in Asia and the world. (2020-05-21)
Exploring the origins of genetic divergence within the Italian population
Genetic adaptations of early Italian ancestors to environmental changes, such as those that occurred soon after the Last Glacial Maximum, may explain some of the genetic differences between northern and southern Italian populations today, according to a study published in BMC Biology. (2020-05-21)
Earliest evidence of Italians' genetic diversity dates back to end of last glacial period
Around 19,000 years ago, after the Late Glacial Maximum, the surprisingly heterogeneous diversity of Italians' genomic background started to develop. (2020-05-21)
Oldest connection with Native Americans identified near Lake Baikal in Siberia
Using human population genetics, ancient pathogen genomics and isotope analysis, a team of researchers assessed the population history of the Lake Baikal region, finding the deepest con-nection to date between the peoples of Siberia and the Americas. (2020-05-20)
Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher. (2020-05-14)
Potential new treatment for severe dry eye disease, RCSI Research
Scientists have discovered a potential new treatment for a disease that causes severe dry eyes and dry mouth. (2020-05-05)
Blood clotting a significant cause of death in patients with COVID-19
A study led by clinician scientists at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences has found that Irish patients admitted to hospital with severe COVID-19 infection are experiencing abnormal blood clotting that contributes to death in some patients. (2020-04-30)
Is it wrong to prioritize younger patients with COVID-19?
With services overburdened, healthcare professionals are having to decide who should receive treatment. (2020-04-22)
Neolithic genomes from modern-day Switzerland indicate parallel ancient societies
Genetic research throughout Europe shows evidence of drastic population changes near the end of the Neolithic period, as shown by the arrival of ancestry related to pastoralists from the Pontic-Caspian steppe. (2020-04-20)
Study offers new insight into the impact of ancient migrations on the European landscape
Scientists from the University of Plymouth and the University of Copenhagen led research tracing how the two major human migrations recorded in Holocene Europe -- the northwestward movement of Anatolian farmer populations during the Neolithic and the westward movement of Yamnaya steppe peoples during the Bronze Age -- unfolded. (2020-04-01)
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