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Current Butterflies News and Events, Butterflies News Articles.
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Monarchs raised in captivity may be worse at migrating than wild monarchs raised outdoors
New research provides clearer picture of the migration behavior of commercially and wild-derived monarchs and the effects of indoor rearing on ability to fly south. (2020-08-04)
Butterfly genomics: Monarchs migrate and fly differently, but meet up and mate
A new study confirms that while the eastern and western butterflies fly differently, they are genetically the same. (2020-07-29)
Scientists discover how deep-sea, ultra-black fish disappear
In the July 16 issue of the journal Current Biology, a team of scientists led by Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History research zoologist Karen Osborn and Duke University biologist Sönke Johnsen report on how a unique arrangement of pigment-packed granules enables some fish to absorb nearly all of the light that hits their skin, so that as little as 0.05% of that light is reflected back. (2020-07-16)
The tug-of-war at the heart of cellular symmetry
Researchers develop an artificial cell that brings to light the dynamics that govern each cell's internal symmetry. (2020-06-25)
Scientists unravel the evolution and relationships for all European butterflies in a first
For the first time, a complete time-calibrated phylogeny for a large group of invertebrates is published for an entire continent. (2020-06-15)
Milkweed, only food source for monarch caterpillars, ubiquitously contaminated
New evidence identifies 64 pesticide residues in milkweed, the main food for monarch butterflies in the west. (2020-06-08)
UCF's butterfly-inspired nanotech makes natural-looking pictures on digital screens
The new technology creates digital displays that are lit by surrounding light and are more natural looking than current display technologies that rely on energy-intensive bright lights hidden behind screens. (2020-06-04)
How some insects manage to halt their own growth in harsh conditions
Most insects alter their own development or physiology to overcome adverse conditions, such as harsh winters. (2020-05-19)
The butterfly effect: Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
The long-term effects of climate change suggests that the butterfly effect is at work on butterflies in the alpine regions of North America, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists -- and the predictions don't bode well. (2020-05-12)
Lyin' eyes: Butterfly, moth eyespots may look the same, but likely evolved separately
The iconic eyespots that some moths and butterflies use to ward off predators likely evolved in distinct ways, providing insights into how these insects became so diverse. (2020-05-06)
New species of moths discovered in the Alps named after three famous alpinists
During a genetic project of the Tyrolean State Museums in Innsbruck, Austrian entomologist and head of the Natural Science Collections Peter Huemer used an integrative research approach to study four long-known, yet controversial European moths. (2020-04-27)
Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Just a few weeks ago, everyone was talking about plummeting insect numbers. (2020-04-24)
Insects: Largest study to date finds declines on land, but recoveries in freshwater
A worldwide compilation of insect abundance studies shows the number of land-dwelling insects is in decline. (2020-04-23)
Human handling stresses young monarch butterflies
People handle monarch butterflies. A lot. Every year thousands of monarch butterflies are caught, tagged and released during their fall migration by citizen scientists helping to track their movements. (2020-04-15)
What do soap bubbles and butterflies have in common?
A unique butterfly breeding experiment gave UC Berkeley researchers an opportunity to study the physical and genetic changes underlying the evolution of structural color, responsible for butterflies' iridescent purples, blues and greens. (2020-04-08)
The evolution of color: Team shows how butterfly wings can shift in hue
A selective mating experiment by a curious butterfly breeder has led scientists to a deeper understanding of how butterfly wing color is created and evolves. (2020-04-07)
To make ultra-black materials that won't weigh things down, consider the butterfly
Some butterflies have ultra-black wings that rival the blackest materials made by humans, using wing scales that are only a fraction as thick. (2020-03-10)
Why do men -- and other male animals -- tend to die younger? It's all in the Y chromosome
Males of most animal species die earlier than females because their smaller Y chromosome is unable to protect an unhealthy X chromosome, research suggests. (2020-03-03)
Male-killing bugs hold key to butterflies' curious color changes
An international team of researchers have shed new light on the complex reproductive process which dictates that only female offspring of the Danaus chrysippus survive -- all in close proximity to Kenya's capital, Nairobi. (2020-02-28)
Male-killing bacteria linked to butterfly color changes
Like many poisonous animals, the African monarch butterfly's orange, white and black pattern warns predators that it is toxic. (2020-02-28)
Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline in UK
Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species led by UCL and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH), and published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-02-17)
Bacteria get free lunch with butterflies and dragonflies
Recent work from Deepa Agashe's group at NCBS has found that unlike other insects, neither butterflies nor dragonflies seem to have evolved strong mutualisms with their bacterial guests. (2020-02-17)
Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey
Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. (2020-02-11)
How some butterflies developed the ability to change their eyespot size
New insight on how a butterfly species developed the ability to adjust its wing eyespot size in response to temperature has been published today in eLife. (2020-02-11)
Butterflies can acquire new scent preferences and pass these on to their offspring
Two studies from the National University of Singapore demonstrate that insects can learn from their previous experiences and adjust their future behaviour for survival and reproduction. (2020-02-03)
Weather radar records drastic drop in mayfly populations
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma, the University of Notre Dame and Virginia Tech applied radar technology -- the same used for meteorology -- to quantify the number of mayflies that emerged annually from two different bodies of water: the Upper Mississippi River and the Western Lake Erie Basin. (2020-02-03)
Pollination is better in cities than in the countryside
Flowering plants are better pollinated in urban than in rural areas. (2020-01-29)
Beating the heat in the living wings of butterflies
Columbia engineers and Harvard biologists discover that butterflies have specialized behaviors and wing scales to protect the living parts of their wings. (2020-01-28)
Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage
Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. (2020-01-14)
Study: Human management helps rare plants, butterflies survive hurricane
Ongoing habitat management could help prevent hurricane-driven extinctions. A rare Florida plant, the pineland croton, weathered the damage from Hurricane Irma better in plots that were under human management than those left alone. (2019-12-18)
Genomic insights: How female butterflies alter investment in attractiveness vs. fecundity
Tradeoffs have been a major focus of evolutionary biologists trying to understand phenotypic diversity, yet almost nothing is known about the mechanistic basis of tradeoffs. (2019-12-17)
UK insects struggling to find a home make a bee-line for foreign plants
Non-native plants are providing new homes for Britain's insects -- some of which are rare on native plants, a new study has found. (2019-12-16)
Team finds link between vitamin A and brain response in Monarch butterflies
Biologists at Texas A&M University are making strides in understanding biological clock function in several model organisms and translating these studies into broader implications for human health. (2019-12-06)
How flowers adapt to their pollinators
The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. (2019-12-05)
SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. (2019-11-28)
Is evolution predictable?
An international team of scientists working with Heliconius butterflies at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama was faced with a mystery: how do pairs of unrelated butterflies from Peru to Costa Rica evolve nearly the same wing-color patterns over and over again? (2019-11-14)
Stanford researchers explore how citizens can become agents of environmental change
Some programs work better than others when it comes to involving citizens in preserving the environment. (2019-11-14)
DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)
Scientists identify British butterflies most threatened by climate change
Many British butterflies and moths have been responding to warmer temperatures by emerging earlier in the year and for the first time scientists have identified why this is creating winners and losers among species. (2019-10-24)
CRISPR technology reveals secret in monarchs' survival
New research from Cornell University sheds light on the secret to the survival of monarch butterflies by revealing how the species developed immunity to fatal milkweed toxins. (2019-10-02)
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