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Current Calcium News and Events

Current Calcium News and Events, Calcium News Articles.
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An ion channel with a doorkeeper: The pH of calcium ions controls ion channel opening
Ion channels are pores in the membrane of cells or cell organelles that allow ions to be transported across the membrane. (2019-06-25)
Making systems robust
Both nature and technology rely on integral feedback mechanisms to ensure that systems resist external perturbations. (2019-06-19)
Higher coronary artery calcium levels in middle-age may indicate higher risk for future heart problems
Middle-aged patients with higher levels of coronary artery calcium buildup were more likely to have higher left ventricular mass and worse left ventricular function of the heart, particularly among blacks. (2019-06-14)
Exciting plant vacuoles
Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. (2019-06-14)
Cause of hardening of the arteries -- and potential treatment -- identified
A team of UK scientists have identified the mechanism behind hardening of the arteries, and shown in animal studies that a generic medication normally used to treat acne could be an effective treatment for the condition. (2019-06-11)
Anti hypertensive drug use was associated with a decreased dementia risk
Various clinical trials indicate what effects can be expected from standardized intervention programs on the basis of existing evidence. (2019-06-03)
Radio-wave therapy proves effective against liver cancer cells
A new targeted therapy using non-thermal radio waves has been shown to block the growth of liver cancer cells anywhere in the body without damaging healthy cells, according to a study conducted by scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health. (2019-05-31)
Researchers find 28% of 35- to 50-year-old men studied are at-risk for osteoporosis
The study analyzed the bone mineral density of 173 adults between 35 and 50 years old. (2019-05-28)
Signalling protein discovery may lead to drug-based therapies to treat hyperparathyroidism
Singapore researchers discover protein that protects parathyroid glands from excessive growth, suggesting potential drug-based strategies to treat hyperparathyroidism and other relevant tumours. (2019-05-28)
Feeling healthy: A good start, but not always a good indicator of heart disease risk
Most people feel they have a general idea of how healthy they are based on their diet and exercise regimen and how often they get sick. (2019-05-15)
Study reveals how glial cells may play key epilepsy role
In eLife, MIT neuroscientists present a new, detailed accounting of how a mutation in a fly model of epilepsy undermines the ability of glial cells to regulate the balance of ions that neurons need to avoid producing seizures. (2019-04-30)
Researchers create artificial mother-of-pearl using bacteria
A University of Rochester biologist invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre using an innovative component: bacteria. (2019-04-23)
Calcium deficiency in cells due to ORAI1 gene mutation leads to damaged tooth enamel
A mutation in the ORAI1 gene -- studied in a human patient and mice -- leads to a loss of calcium in enamel cells and results in defective dental enamel mineralization, finds a study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. (2019-04-23)
New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones
A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals. (2019-04-23)
Parboiling method reduces inorganic arsenic in rice
Contamination of rice with arsenic is a major problem in some regions of the world with high rice consumption. (2019-04-17)
Biosensor 'bandage' collects and analyzes sweat
Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what's going on inside the body. (2019-04-17)
Harnessing microorganisms for smart microsystems
A research team at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a method to construct a biohybrid system that incorporates Vorticella microorganisms. (2019-04-12)
Near-atomic map of parathyroid hormone complex points toward new therapies for osteoporosis
An international team of scientists has mapped a molecular complex that could aid in the development of better medications with fewer side effects for osteoporosis and cancer. (2019-04-11)
Using bacteria to protect roads from deicer deterioration
Special bacteria that help form limestone and marble could soon have a new job on a road crew. (2019-04-09)
Too much of a good thing? High doses of vitamin D can lead to kidney failure
A case study in CMAJ highlights the dangers of taking too much vitamin D. (2019-04-08)
Wood ash recycling program could help save Muskoka's forests and lakes
Implementing a new residential wood ash recycling program to restore calcium levels in Muskoka's forest soils and lakes could help replenish the area's dwindling supply of crayfish and maple sap, according to new research co-led by York University. (2019-03-28)
Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?
Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics. (2019-03-27)
NIH study finds no evidence that calcium increases risk of AMD
Eating a calcium-rich diet or taking calcium supplements does not appear to increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to the findings of a study by scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI). (2019-03-21)
Study examines calcium intake, age-related macular degeneration progression risk
This study looked at the association of calcium intake (dietary and supplementation) with the risk and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness. (2019-03-21)
Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography
Researchers from the George Washington University and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity. (2019-03-21)
New material will allow abandoning bone marrow transplantation
Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' developed nanomaterial, which will be able to restore the internal structure of bones damaged due to osteoporosis and osteomyelitis. (2019-03-19)
Calcium in arteries is shown to increase patients' imminent risk of a heart attack
New research findings presented at the American College Cardiology Scientific Sessions from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City shows that identifying the presence or absence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in a patients' arteries can help determine their future risk. (2019-03-16)
Two papers describe how a membrane protein can move both lipids and ions
The TMEM16 family of membrane proteins was hailed as representing the elusive calcium-activated chloride channels. (2019-03-12)
Fatal horizon, driven by acidification, closes in on marine organisms in Southern Ocean
Marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may find themselves in a deadly vise grip by century's end as ocean acidification creates a shallower horizon for life. (2019-03-11)
Why you lose hearing for a while after listening to loud sounds
When we listen to loud sounds, our hearing may become impaired for a short time. (2019-03-08)
How bacteria can help prevent coal ash spills
Researchers have developed a technique that uses bacteria to produce 'biocement' in coal ash ponds, making the coal ash easier to store and limiting the risk of coal ash spills into surface waters. (2019-03-04)
Kidney disease killer vulnerable to targeted nano therapy
By loading a chelation drug into a nano-sized homing device, researchers at Clemson University have reversed in an animal model the deadliest effects of chronic kidney disease, which kills more people in the United States each year than breast or prostate cancer. (2019-03-04)
Open-source software tracks neural activity in real time
A software tool called CaImAn automates the arduous process of tracking the location and activity of neurons. (2019-02-28)
Immunizing quantum computers against errors
Researchers at ETH Zurich have used trapped calcium ions to demonstrate a new method for making quantum computers immune to errors. (2019-02-27)
Thirty years of fast food: Greater variety, but more salt, larger portions, and added calories
Despite the addition of some healthful menu items, fast food is even more unhealthy for you than it was 30 years ago. (2019-02-27)
Chelated calcium benefits poinsettias
Cutting quality has an impact on postharvest durability during shipping and propagation of poinsettias. (2019-02-27)
Epilepsy: Triangular relationship in the brain
When an epileptic seizure occurs in the brain, the nerve cells lose their usual pattern and fire in a very fast rhythm. (2019-02-25)
New MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain
MIT researchers have developed an MRI-based calcium sensor that allows them to peer deep into the brain. (2019-02-22)
Controlling and visualizing receptor signals in neural cells with light
Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualized serotonin receptor signals in neural cells. (2019-02-14)
US older women three times as likely to be treated for osteoporosis as men
Older women in the US are three times as likely to be treated for osteoporosis as men of the same age, reveals research published online in the Journal of Investigative Medicine. (2019-02-14)
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