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Current Calibration News and Events

Current Calibration News and Events, Calibration News Articles.
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Researchers employ antennas for angstrom displacement sensing
Micro -- nano Optics and Technology Research Group led by Prof. (2020-06-28)
NIST researchers boost microwave signal stability a hundredfold
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used state-of-the-art atomic clocks, advanced light detectors, and a measurement tool called a frequency comb to boost the stability of microwave signals 100-fold. (2020-05-21)
Determining the quantity and location of lipids in the brain
The Sweedler Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed a new technique to measure the amount and distribution of lipids in rat brain samples. (2020-05-19)
How does nitrogen dynamics affect carbon and water budgets in China?
Scientists investigate how nitrogen dynamics affects carbon and water budgets in China by incorporating the terrestrial nitrogen cycle into the Noah Land Surface Model. (2020-05-06)
Fiber optics capture seismic signatures of the rose parade
Interesting signatures of the Rose Parade were captured by fiber optic telecommunications cable lying below the parade route. (2020-05-06)
Moderate exercise in middle and older age cuts time spent in hospital
Men and women aged 40-79 are at 25-27% lower risk of long or frequent hospital admissions if they do some form of physical activity, a new study suggests. (2020-05-06)
The best things come in small packages
A low-cost miniaturized carbon dioxide monitoring instrument has been developed. (2020-04-21)
Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events
A new paper led by Cornell University points out the need for an important new refinement to the technique. (2020-03-18)
New study finds inaccuracies in arsenic test kits in Bangladesh
Researchers at the University of Michigan have raised serious concerns with the performance of some arsenic test kits commonly used in Bangladesh to monitor water contamination. (2020-03-04)
UBC research reveals young children prefer to learn from confident people
Researchers found that young children between the age of four and five not only prefer to learn from people who appear confident, they also keep track of how well the person's confidence has matched with their knowledge and accuracy in the past (a concept called 'calibration') and avoid learning new information from people who have a history of being overconfident. (2020-01-27)
Measuring the world of social phenomena
Economists working with Professor Marko Sarstedt from University of Magdeburg are demanding that the same scientific standards be applied to economics and the behavioral sciences in general as are used in the natural sciences. (2020-01-20)
Counting photons is now routine enough to need standards
NIST has taken a step toward enabling universal standards for single-photon detectors (SPDs), which are becoming increasingly important in science and industry. (2019-12-20)
Designer lens helps see the big picture
An innovative optical component and a reconstruction algorithm provide more detailed images. (2019-11-20)
Simultaneous measurement of biophysical properties and position of single cells in a microdevice
SUTD researchers developed an N-shaped electrode-based microfluidic impedance cytometry device for the simultaneous measurement of the lateral position and physical properties of single cells and particles in continuous flows. (2019-11-19)
A new facial analysis method detects genetic syndromes with high precision and specificity
Developed by Araceli Morales, Gemma Piella and Federico Sukno, members of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, together with researchers from the University of Washington, which they present in a feature in the advanced online edition of Lecture Notes in Computer Science of Oct. (2019-11-13)
Hydrologic simulation models that inform policy decisions are difficult to interpret
Hydrologic models that simulate and predict water flow are used to estimate how natural systems respond to different scenarios such as changes in climate, land use, and soil management. (2019-10-11)
Sharing data for improved forest protection and monitoring
Although the mapping of aboveground biomass is now possible with satellite remote sensing, these maps still have to be calibrated and validated using on-site data gathered by researchers across the world. (2019-10-10)
Test for life-threatening nutrient deficit is made from bacteria entrails
A pocket-sized zinc deficiency test could be taken to remote regions where masses are malnourished - no complex transport or preservation necessary. (2019-09-25)
Mathematical model could help correct bias in measuring bacterial communities
A mathematical model shows how bias distorts results when measuring bacterial communities through metagenomic sequencing. (2019-09-10)
Tiny lensless endoscope captures 3D images of objects smaller than a cell
Researchers have developed a new self-calibrating endoscope that produces 3D images of objects smaller than a single cell. (2019-08-15)
New developments with Chinese satellites over the past decade
To date, 17 Chinese self-developed FengYun (FY) meteorological satellites have been launched, which are widely applied in weather analysis, numerical weather forecasting and climate prediction, as well as environment and disaster monitoring. (2019-07-11)
NIST presents first real-world test of new smokestack emissions sensor designs
In collaboration with industry, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have completed the first real-world test of a potentially improved way to measure smokestack emissions in coal-fired power plants. (2019-06-27)
Calibration method improves scientific research performed with smartphone cameras
Although smartphones and other consumer cameras are increasingly used for scientific applications, it's difficult to compare and combine data from different devices. (2019-06-24)
A more accurate, low-cost 39 GHz beamforming transceiver for 5G communications
Researchers at Tokyo Tech and NEC Corporation, Japan, present a 39 GHz transceiver with built-in calibration for fifth-generation (5G) applications. (2019-06-03)
Precision calibration empowers largest solar telescope
An article published in the SPIE publication Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems (JATIS), 'Polarization Modeling and Predictions for DKIST Part 5: Impacts of enhanced mirror and dichroic coatings on system polarization calibration,' marks a substantial advance in ensuring the accurate solar information measured and collected by the Daniel K. (2019-06-03)
Fiber-based imaging spectrometer captures record amounts of data
Researchers have developed a new compact, fiber-based imaging spectrometer for remote sensing that can capture 30,000 sampling points each containing more than 60 wavelengths. (2019-05-20)
Precise temperature measurements with invisible light
NIST researchers have invented a portable, remarkably stable thermometer capable of measuring temperatures to a precision of within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius. (2019-05-09)
Shambhala helps understand the 'decoding' of RNA
Scientists at Sechenov University, together with their Russian and American colleagues, developed the tool named Shambhala, which can process the 'decoding' of RNA obtained on different equipment to make them suitable for comparison and further study. (2019-05-04)
Virtual reality could be used to treat autism
Playing games in virtual reality (VR) could be a key tool in treating people with neurological disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. (2019-03-28)
Codifying the universal language of honey bees
In a paper appearing in April's issue of Animal Behaviour researchers decipher the instructive messages encoded in the insects' movements, called waggle dances. (2019-03-27)
Optical clocks started the calibration of the international atomic time
Optical clocks of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) and LNE-SYRTE (Systemes de Reference Temps-Espace, Observatoire de Paris, Universite PSL, CNRS, Sorbonne Universite, France) evaluated the latest 'one second' tick of the International Atomic Time (TAI) and provided these data to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures to be referred for adjusting the tick rate of TAI. (2019-03-04)
New X-ray measurement approach could improve CT scanners
A new measurement approach proposed by NIST scientists could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors. (2019-03-01)
More water resources over the Sahel region of Africa in the 21st century under global warming
Scientists from Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the projection uncertainty of Sahel summer precipitation among the climate models is closely related to the historical precipitation simulation in South Asia and the western North Pacific. (2019-02-22)
Spherical display brings virtual collaboration closer to reality
Virtual reality can often make a user feel isolated from the world, with only computer-generated characters for company. (2019-02-19)
Is our personality affected by the way we look? (Or the way we think we look?)
To what extent is our personality an adaptation to our appearance or even our physique? (2019-02-11)
Smartphone use risks eye examination misdiagnosis
Clinicians who use smartphones to capture photographs of patients' eyes risk misdiagnosis if they base their decisions on objective data extracted from non-calibrated cameras. (2019-02-07)
Making the Hubble's deepest images even deeper
It has taken researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias almost three years to produce the deepest image of the Universe ever taken from space, by recovering a large quantity of 'lost' light around the largest galaxies in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field. (2019-01-24)
SFU scientists automated electrolyte composition analysis for aluminium production
A team from Siberian Federal University (SFU) suggested a new method for automatic composition analysis of electrolyte samples from electrolysis baths. (2018-12-12)
Researchers develop personalized medicine tool for inherited colorectal cancer syndrome
An international team of researchers led by Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) has developed, calibrated, and validated a novel tool for identifying the genetic changes in Lynch syndrome genes that are likely to be responsible for causing symptoms of the disease. (2018-12-10)
No bleeding required: Anemia detection via smartphone
Instead of a blood test, an app uses smartphone photos of someone's fingernails to accurately measure hemoglobin levels. (2018-12-04)
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