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Global surgical guidelines drive cut in post-surgery deaths -- study
The English National Health Service (NHS) reduced post-operative deaths by 37.2% following the introduction of globally recognised surgical guidelines -- paving the way for life-saving action in low -- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a new study reveals. (2019-06-25)
Deaths from cardiovascular diseases attributable to heat and cold down 38% in Spain
Women are more vulnerable to heat, while cold-related deaths are more common among men. (2019-06-20)
Researchers identify compounds that starve melanoma cancer cells of energy
Researchers have found a possible counterpunch to the drug resistance of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. (2019-06-18)
Early exposure to banking influences life-long financial health
Growing up in a community with or without banks has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new Iowa State University study. (2019-05-16)
International study suggests that eating more rice could be protective against obesity
Obesity levels are substantially lower in countries that consume high amounts of rice (average 150g/day/person), while counties with lower average rice intake (average 14g/day/person) have higher obesity levels, according to an international study of 136 countries, being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow. (2019-04-30)
Primary care services account for a small share of Medicare spending, study finds
Some states including Oregon and Rhode Island have begun adopting minimum primary care spending goals because health system orientation toward primary care is associated with higher quality, better outcomes and lower costs. (2019-04-15)
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Economic growth linked to reduction in stunting and thinness, but rise in overweight and obesity in Chinese children and adolescents
The first study to evaluate the effect of economic growth on malnutrition in all its forms has found that, while stunting and thinness have ameliorated in recent years, a four-fold increase in overweight and obesity among children and adolescents occurred in China between 1995 and 2014, with around one in five children and adolescents now either overweight or obese. (2019-03-19)
Immigration is beneficial to economies, even after 100 years
A new paper published in the Review of Economic Studies finds that US counties with more historical immigration have higher incomes, less poverty, and lower unemployment today. (2019-03-12)
Study: Democracy fosters economic growth
A new study co-authored by an MIT economist shows that when it comes to growth, democracy significantly increases development. (2019-03-07)
Paper: Carbon taxes could create new winners and losers among countries
A global carbon tax would create new sets of economic winners and losers, with some countries holding a distinct competitive advantage over others, says new research from Don Fullerton, a Gutgsell Professor of Finance at Illinois and a scholar at the Institute of Government and Public Affairs. (2019-02-19)
Primary care physician supply and life expectancy
This study used U.S. population data to identify changes in the supply of primary care physicians across counties from 2005 to 2015 and the association with life expectancy and other outcomes. (2019-02-18)
The prospects of american strawberries
A team of 12 researchers from 10 different states embarked on an academic journey designed to generate an effective guideline essential for research, policy, and marketing strategies for the strawberry industry across the country, and to enable the development of general and region-specific educational and production tools. (2019-02-15)
More die after surgery than from HIV, TB, and malaria combined -- study
Around the world 4.2 million people die every year within 30 days after surgery -- with half of these deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a new study reveals. (2019-01-31)
Future changes in human well-being to depend more on social factors than economic factors
The changes in the perception of personal well-being that could take place in the next three decades, on a global level, depend much more on social factors than on economic ones. (2019-01-28)
US health care spending highest among developed countries
The United States, on a per capita basis, spends much more on health care than other developed countries; the chief reason is not greater health care utilization, but higher prices, according to a study from a team led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher. (2019-01-07)
Why Hong Kong, Japan and Iceland are the best countries for human development
Since its introduction in 1990, UN's Human Development Index has contributed to a better understanding of development, but has its flaws. (2018-12-21)
Experts call for a targeted approach to cancer prevention
Policymakers around the world should consider introducing more targeted early interventions in a bid to tackle cancer, according to experts at the University of Stirling. (2018-11-01)
Loss of work productivity in a warming world
Heat stress affects the health of workers and reduces the work productivity by changing the ambient working environment thus leading to economic losses. (2018-10-26)
Economic analysis provides watershed moment for environmental groups
Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality. (2018-10-12)
Unprecedented study finds US ranks 27th among nations investing in education, health care
The United States ranks 27th in the world for its investments in education and health care as measurements of its commitment to economic growth, according to the first-ever scientific study ranking countries for their levels of human capital. (2018-09-24)
China's energy policies must balance air quality, carbon emissions and water scarcity goals
The use of coal-based synthetic natural gas, known by the acronym 'SNG,' would increase carbon emissions and water demand, especially in regions in China that already have high per capita carbon emissions and water scarcity, according to a study in Nature Sustainability. (2018-09-14)
Healthcare cuts 'strongly linked' to the resurgence of measles
Studies show that primary reason for the measles outbreak, affecting several European countries, is the decline in vaccination coverage, for which mainly the 'spread of anti-scientific theories' can be blamed. (2018-09-12)
Low birth weight linked to obesity, diabetes, and hypertension later in life
In a recent study, low birth weight was associated with subsequent obesity and the prevalence and risk of type 2 diabetes and hypertension in adulthood. (2018-08-22)
EU households waste over 17 billion kg of fresh fruit and vegetables a year
A recently published article from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, finds that EU households generate about 35.3 kg of fresh fruit and vegetable waste per person per year, 14.2 kg of which is avoidable. (2018-08-13)
Immigrants use little health care, subsidize care of non-immigrants: Harvard/Tufts study
A study in the International Journal of Health Services finds that immigrants use far less health care than non-immigrants, and may actually subsidize the care of US citizens. (2018-08-08)
Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars
Poor mental health may cost businesses nearly as much as physical health problems, according to researchers. (2018-07-30)
Reducing Australia's cancer death rate
New research has revealed for the first time what impact cutting back on drinking and smoking as a population would have on Australia's cancer death rate. (2018-07-13)
Asylum seekers positively affect host countries' economy, though on slower timescale
Asylum seekers fleeing to Western European countries to escape war-ridden areas positively affect a host countries' economy, according to a new report that analyzes 30 years' worth of economic and migration data. (2018-06-20)
No, asylum seekers are not a 'burden' for European economies
Does the arrival of asylum seekers lead to a deterioration in the economic performance and public finances of the European countries that host them? (2018-06-20)
Campylobacter -- the germ on chicken eggs
Eggs are a popular food. In fact, Germans consumed almost 20 billion of them in 2016, which equates to a per capita consumption of 235 eggs. (2018-05-30)
Per-capita end-of-life spending is decreasing rapidly, according to new study
Contrary to other recent studies, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center find that end-of-life spending has been decreasing and contributing to the overall moderation of Medicare spending growth (2018-05-15)
Uncertainty in long-run economic growth likely points toward greater emissions, climate change costs
A challenge in estimating the extent and cost of damages from climate change over the next 100 years is developing forecasts of long-run economic growth. (2018-05-14)
Big mamma fish give proportionally bigger reproductive outputs
Even accounting for their proportionate size, bigger female fish produce many more offspring than smaller fish, a new study reveals. (2018-05-10)
For how long will the USA remain the Nobel Prize leader?
Since first being awarded in 1901, most Nobel Prizes for science have gone to the USA, the United Kingdom, Germany and France. (2018-05-09)
Low-carbon energy transition requires more renewables than previously thought
The transition to a low-carbon energy society will require more renewable energy sources than previously thought if current levels of energy consumption per capita and lifestyles are to be maintained. (2018-05-04)
Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East Africa
Over the last 50 years climate change has not been the key driver of the human displacement or conflict in East Africa, rather it is politics and poverty, according to new research by UCL. (2018-04-24)
New study finds people covered by universal health coverage will fall far below SDGs
An estimated 5.4 billion people globally are expected to be covered under some form of universal health care (UHC) by 2030, up from 4.3 billion in 2015, but far below the related target in United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, according to a new scientific study. (2018-04-17)
First long-term study finds half trillion dollars spent on HIV/AIDS
Spending on HIV/AIDS globally between 2000 and 2015 totaled more than half a trillion dollars, according to a new scientific study, the first comprehensive analysis of funding for the disease. (2018-04-17)
Australia to join global health and climate change initiative
Australia is set to join a global initiative tracking progress on health and climate change, say University of Sydney and Macquarie University authors of a Perspective in today's Medical Journal of Australia. (2018-04-15)
The future holds challenges and opportunities for dairy producers
Over the last two years, scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Sweden have examined projections and current data to identify ways in which the dairy industry may respond to these challenges to meet increased demand for dairy products over the next half century. (2018-04-05)
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