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Researchers develop method for earlier detection of Alzheimer's Disease
Washington State University scientists have developed a method to detect the biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease that is 10 times more sensitive than current blood testing technology. (2020-10-20)
A new material for separating CO2 from industrial waste gases, natural gas, or biogas
With the new material, developed at the University of Bayreuth, the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) can be specifically separated from industrial waste gases, natural gas, or biogas, and thereby made available for recycling. (2020-10-20)
Paper recycling must be powered by renewables to save climate
The study, published in Nature Sustainability, found that greenhouse gas emissions would increase by 2050 if we recycled more paper, as current methods rely on fossil fuels and electricity from the grid. (2020-10-19)
Membranes for capturing carbon dioxide from the air
CO¬2 capture from the air can mitigate further CO2 emissions, related increase in global temperature and climate change. (2020-10-16)
RUDN University soil scientist: Paddy soil fertilization can help reduce greenhouse effect
A soil scientist from RUDN University discovered the effect of fertilization on the ability of the soil to retain carbon. (2020-10-16)
NASA supercomputing study breaks ground for tree mapping, carbon research
A new method for mapping the location and size of trees growing outside of forests helped scientists discover billions of trees in arid and semi-arid regions and lays the groundwork for more accurate global measurement of carbon storage on land. (2020-10-16)
A controllable membrane to pull carbon dioxide out of exhaust streams
A system developed by chemical engineers at MIT could provide a way of continuously removing carbon dioxide from a stream of waste gases, or even from the air. (2020-10-16)
Deep-sea corals reveal secrets of rapid carbon dioxide increase as the last ice age ended
The Southern Ocean played a critical role in the rapid atmospheric carbon dioxide increase during the last deglaciation that took place 20,000 to 10,000 years ago, an international team of researchers report in Science Advances. (2020-10-16)
Deep sea coral time machines reveal ancient CO2 burps
The fossilised remains of ancient deep-sea corals may act as time machines providing new insights into the effect the ocean has on rising CO2 levels, according to new research carried out by the Universities of Bristol, St Andrews and Nanjing and published today [16 October 2020] in Science Advances. (2020-10-16)
Scientists propose potential method for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy
A joint research team led by Prof. WANG Hui and Prof. (2020-10-15)
A fraction of global COVID-19 stimulus funds could aid climate change efforts
A modest fraction of worldwide COVID-19 economic stimulus package funds--which have surpassed USD 12 trillion to date--could help put the world on track to Paris Agreement goals for the climate, say Marina Andrijevic and colleagues in this Policy Forum. (2020-10-15)
Fraction of money earmarked for COVID-19 recovery could boost climate efforts
Global stimulus plans for economic recovery after the pandemic could easily cover climate-friendly policies, suggests new study. (2020-10-15)
Clean and clear: How being more transparent over resources helps cut carbon emissions
Countries that sign up to improved financial transparency over oil, gas, and mining revenues benefit from significant reductions in carbon emissions, a new study by the University of Sussex Business School reveals. (2020-10-14)
COVID-19 rapid test has successful lab results, research moves to next stages
Rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in about 30 seconds following the test, has had successful preliminary results in Mano Misra's lab at the University of Nevada, Reno. (2020-10-14)
Pandemic lockdowns caused steep and lasting carbon dioxide decline
Climate experts today released an assessment of carbon dioxide emissions by industry, transportation and other sectors from January through June, showing that this year's pandemic lockdowns resulted in a 9 percent decline from 2019 levels. (2020-10-14)
KIST addressing algal bloom in conventional water treatment facilities
An algal bloom refers to a phenomenon in which phytoplankton including blue-green algae rapidly proliferate in summer marked by high levels of solar irradiation and water temperature. (2020-10-12)
Australian valley a 'natural laboratory' to test carbon sequestration theory
An idea to enhance natural carbon capture from olivine weathering has never been tested at scale. (2020-10-12)
Fuels, not fire weather, control carbon emissions in boreal forest
A team led by Northern Arizona University found that the amount of carbon that burns in wildfires in western boreal forests depends more on available fuels than on fire weather such as drought conditions, temperature, or rain. (2020-10-12)
Deep-seabed mining lastingly disrupts the seafloor food web
Deep-seabed mining is considered a way to address the increasing need of rare metals. (2020-10-08)
Researchers find increases in nitrous oxide emissions, outpacing global predictions
The term ''greenhouse gas'' is often used interchangeably with carbon dioxide, due to its prevalence in our atmosphere - more than 80 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, estimates the Environmental Protection Agency. (2020-10-08)
Low-hanging fruit
For seven years now, the University of California system has been working hard to reduce its carbon emissions as part of its Carbon Neutrality Initiative. (2020-10-08)
Next-gen smartphones to keep their cool
Multilayered carbon material could be the perfect fit for heat management in electronic devices. (2020-10-07)
Who is driving whom? Climate and carbon cycle in perpetual interaction
The current climate crisis underlines that carbon cycle perturbations can cause significant climate change. (2020-10-06)
Imaging technique could replace tissue biopsies in assessing drug resistance in cancer
Imaging techniques could replace the need for invasive tissue biopsies in helping rapidly determine whether cancer treatments are working effectively, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2020-10-06)
Indonesia's old and deep peatlands offer an archive of environmental changes
Researchers probing peatlands to discover clues about past environments and carbon stocks on land have identified peatland on Borneo that is twice as old and much deeper than previously thought. (2020-10-06)
Two's a crowd: Nuclear and renewables don't mix
If countries want to lower emissions as substantially, rapidly and cost-effectively as possible, they should prioritize support for renewables, rather than nuclear power, the findings of a major new energy study concludes. (2020-10-05)
Lego-like assembly of zeolitic membranes improves carbon capture
EPFL chemical engineers have developed a new way to manufacture zeolitic membranes, state-of-the-art materials used for gas separation in harsh conditions. (2020-10-05)
Spinach: good for popeye and the planet
Spinach, when converted from its leafy, edible form into carbon nanosheets, acts as a catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. (2020-10-05)
China's air pollutant reduction success could make it tougher to control climate change
China's success in improving air quality by cutting polluting emissions may have a negative knock-on effect on climate change overall, a new study has found. (2020-09-29)
Potential for natural forest regrowth to capture carbon
A major new study that maps potential aboveground carbon accumulation rates for forest regrowth across the globe. (2020-09-29)
Why disordered light-harvesting systems produce ordered outcomes
Scientists typically prefer to work with ordered systems. However, a diverse team of physicists and biophysicists from the University of Groningen found that individual light-harvesting nanotubes with disordered molecular structures still transport light energy in the same way. (2020-09-29)
Lessons from a cooling climate
Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. (2020-09-29)
Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells. (2020-09-29)
OU-led study aims to use microbial information to inform global climate change models
A study led by researchers from the OU Institute of Environmental Genomics tackles a problem that has challenged scientists for more than a decade. (2020-09-29)
Someday, even wet forests could burn due to climate change
While today's fires are exacerbated by dry conditions, researchers found that forest fires 94 million years ago increased even in wet regions due to changes in global climate. (2020-09-29)
Oligomeric materials to enhance water splitting
Researchers from the Llobet group have developed a new molecular material made out of oligomers and used it as a catalyst in water oxidation, achieving unprecedented current densities for molecular catalysts. (2020-09-28)
Study finds spreading ghost forests on NC coast may contribute to climate change
A new study found the spread of ghost forests across a coastal region of North Carolina may have implications for global warming. (2020-09-28)
Despite high hopes, carbon absorbed by Amazon forest recovery is dwarfed by deforestation emissions
After calculating how much carbon had been lost through deforestation, scientists have discovered that, in more than 30 years, the regrowth of secondary forests in the Brazilian Amazon has offset less than 10 per cent of emissions from the loss of old-growth forests. (2020-09-28)
Neurons in spinal-cord injuries are reconnected in vivo via carbon nanotube sponges
Research conducted by two groups at the Center for Cooperative Research in Biomaterials CIC biomaGUNE and one at SISSA, Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (Italy), showed that functional materials based on carbon nanotubes offer a possible means for facilitating the reconnecting of neuronal networks damaged as a result of spinal cord injuries. (2020-09-28)
Spinal injuries: the recovery of motor skills thanks to nanomaterials
Re-establishing motor skills and neuronal connectivity thanks to the implantation of carbon nanotubes in the injury site. (2020-09-28)
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