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Current Carbon nanotubes News and Events

Current Carbon nanotubes News and Events, Carbon nanotubes News Articles.
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Study: Deep-ocean creatures living a 'feast-or-famine' existence because of energy fluxes
Scientists for the first time have tracked how much energy from plants and animals at the surface of the open ocean survives as particles drop to the seafloor more than two miles below, where they say a surprisingly robust ecosystem eagerly awaits. (2019-04-26)
How to take the 'petro' out of the petrochemicals industry
University of Toronto Engineering researchers chart a course for how an alternative technology -- renewable electrosynthesis -- could usher in a more sustainable chemical industry, and ultimately enable us to leave much more oil and gas in the ground. (2019-04-25)
New view of how ocean 'pumps' impact climate change
A new Rochester study has found that factors such as wind, currents, and even small fish play a larger role in transferring and storing carbon from the surface of the ocean to the deep oceans than was previously thought. (2019-04-25)
Imaging system helps surgeons remove tiny ovarian tumors
Researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a way to improve the accuracy of surgery to remove ovarian tumors. (2019-04-24)
Study shows the potential of carbon nanotubes to cool electronic circuits
Mechanically stretched carbon nanotubes extract heat efficiently and could be used to cool flexible electronic devices, for example. (2019-04-24)
Microbes may act as gatekeepers of Earth's Deep Carbon
Two years ago a team of scientists visited Costa Rica's subduction zone, where the ocean floor sinks beneath the continent and volcanoes tower above the surface. (2019-04-24)
Major deep carbon sink linked to microbes found near volcano chains
Up to about 19% more carbon dioxide than previously believed is removed naturally and stored underground between coastal trenches and inland chains of volcanoes, keeping the greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere, according to a study in the journal Nature. (2019-04-24)
Controls could lead to increased pollution outside China's capital region
China's ambitious pollution control policies centered on its capital-area cities of Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei could increase air pollution, carbon dioxide emissions, and water consumption outside this target region, according to new modeling by Delin Fang and colleagues. (2019-04-24)
Eclogitic diamonds formed from oceanic crust, study shows
Eclogitic diamonds formed in Earth's mantle originate from oceanic crust, rather than marine sediments as commonly thought, according to a new study from University of Alberta geologists. (2019-04-24)
Study: Microbes could influence earth's geological processes as much as volcanoes
By acting as gatekeepers, microbes can affect geological processes that move carbon from the earth's surface into its deep interior, according to a study published in Nature and coauthored by microbiologists at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-04-24)
Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay
Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in air flowing out to sea from Silicon Valley and the Salinas Valley could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving in Monterey Bay waters by about 20 percent. (2019-04-23)
Study: Reducing energy required to convert CO2 waste into valuable resources
Surplus industrial carbon dioxide creates an opportunity to convert waste into a valuable commodity. (2019-04-22)
From 2D to 1D: Atomically quasi '1D' wires using a carbon nanotube template
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have used carbon nanotube templates to produce nanowires of transition metal monochalcogenide (TMM), which are only 3 atoms wide in diameter. (2019-04-20)
New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics
A novel family of amphiphilic core-sheath structured CNT composited fiber, i.e., CNT-gold@hydrophilic CNT-polyaniline (CNT-Au@OCNT-PANI) with excellent electrochemical properties for wearable electronics was explored by Huisheng Peng et al. in Science China Materials. (2019-04-18)
Need more energy storage? Just hit 'print'
Drexel University researchers have developed a conductive ink made from a special type of material they discovered, called MXene, that was used by the Trinity College researchers to print components for electronic devices. (2019-04-17)
Modern Midas turns bacterial components into catalysts
A team from University of Science and Technology of China found a way to transform bacterial cellulose into solid acid catalysts, just like the power of Midas to turn a stone into gold. (2019-04-17)
New research offers solution to riddle of ocean carbon storage
Research by a team of the world's leading oceanographers has proposed a new explanation for how the ocean absorbs and stores carbon, solving a riddle that has long puzzled scientists. (2019-04-17)
Balancing the ocean carbon budget
How exactly does the ocean -- the Earth's largest carbon sink -- capture and store carbon? (2019-04-17)
Climate engineering needs to look at the big picture, says researcher
Climate engineering research is too focused on specific aspects of individual projects, argues Nadine Mengis. (2019-04-16)
How inland waters 'breathe' carbon -- and what it means for global systems
A new Yale study reveals important insights into the factors that influence the release of greenhouse gases from rivers and streams, including a key relationship between storm events, ecology, and topography in moderating this release. (2019-04-16)
Plastic's carbon footprint
From campaigns against microplastics to news of the great Pacific garbage patch, public awareness is growing about the outsized effect plastic has on the world's oceans. (2019-04-15)
Electric vehicle adoption improves air quality and climate outlook
A Northwestern University study quantified the differences in air pollution generated from battery-powered electric vehicles versus internal combustion engines. (2019-04-12)
New tunable nanomaterials possible due to flexible process invented by Bath physicists
Physicists at the University of Bath have developed a flexible process allowing the synthesis in a single flow of a wide range of novel nanomaterials with various morphologies, with potential applications in areas including optics and sensors. (2019-04-11)
Ice Ages occur when tropical islands and continents collide
Earth's steady state is warm and balmy, but half a dozen times over the past billion years, the planet developed ice caps and glaciers. (2019-04-11)
2D gold quantum dots are atomically tunable with nanotubes
Gold atoms ski along boron nitride nanotubes and stabilize in metallic monolayers. (2019-04-11)
Human activities shift dominant tree-fungi pairing in North America
The dominant type of tree-fungi pairing found in North American forests has shifted during the past three decades, in response in human activities such as increased nitrogen deposition and fire suppression, as well as climate change. (2019-04-10)
Greener, more efficient natural gas filtration
MIT researchers have developed a new polymer membrane that can dramatically improve the efficiency of natural gas purification, while reducing its environmental impact. (2019-04-09)
Shrinking the carbon footprint of a chemical in everyday objects
MIT chemical engineers have devised an alternative approach to synthesizing epoxides, a type of chemical that is found in many products, including plastics, pharmaceuticals and textiles. (2019-04-09)
Climate change impacts peatland CO2 gas exchange primarily via moisture conditions
A new study led by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and Natural Resources Institute Finland suggests that peatland CO2 exchange is more strongly influenced by drying than warming as such, and that soil moisture may be critical to determining whether fen ecosystems are able to adapt to a changing climate. (2019-04-08)
Carbon lurking in deep ocean threw ancient climate switch, say researchers
A million years ago, a longtime pattern of alternating glaciations and warm periods dramatically changed, when ice ages suddenly became longer and more intense. (2019-04-08)
Renewables are a better investment than carbon capture for tackling climate change
Solar panels and wind turbines coupled with energy storage offer a better hope for tackling climate change than trying to capture carbon from fossil fuel power stations, according to new research published by Nature Energy. (2019-04-08)
Carbon-negative power generation for China
Researchers from the Harvard and China have analyzed technical and economic viability for China to move towards carbon-negative electric power generation. (2019-04-08)
Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth
Ancient organic matter of biological origin has been tracked in multiple samples of rock spanning over 2,000 million years of Earth's history, according to UCL researchers. (2019-04-08)
The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon
As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding. (2019-04-05)
Metal-free catalyst to convert aldehyde into ketone, a basic structure of pharmaceuticals
We succeeded in synthesizing a ketone, a basic structure of many pharmaceuticals, from an aldehyde and a carboxylic acid using N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst under mild conditions. (2019-04-03)
study looks to iron from microbes for climate help
Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could 'fertilize' microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new paper in Frontiers. (2019-04-03)
Restore natural forests to meet global climate goals
International plans to restore forests to combat global warming are flawed and will fall far short of meeting 1.5C climate targets, according to new research by UCL and University of Edinburgh scientists. (2019-04-02)
New record on the growth of graphene single crystals
An exciting rapid growth of large graphene single crystal on liquid Cu with the rate up to 79 μm s-1 based on the liquid metal chemical vapor deposition strategy was released by Lei Fu et al. in Science China Materials. (2019-04-02)
Teaching computers to intelligently design 'billions' of possible materials
At the University of Missouri, researchers in the College of Engineering are applying one of the first uses of deep learning -- the technology computers use to intelligently perform tasks such as recognizing language and driving autonomous vehicles -- to the field of materials science. (2019-04-02)
London cyclists warned evening commute has the dirtiest air, so pick a clean route home
Cyclists in London should take a different route back home during evening peak-time hours to avoid breathing in harmful black carbon from vehicles. (2019-04-01)
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