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Current Carbon News and Events

Current Carbon News and Events, Carbon News Articles.
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Black carbon found in the Amazon River reveals recent forest burnings
International study quantified and characterized charcoal and soot produced by incomplete burning of trees and transported by river to the Atlantic. (2019-11-20)
Planting on pasture land may provide sustainable alternative for oil palm plantations
Converting already-degraded pasture to oil palm plantations avoids the large loss of stored carbon associated with clearing rainforests to make way for these plantations, according to a long-term, Colombia-based study. (2019-11-20)
When grown right, palm oil can be sustainable
Turning an abandoned pasture into a palm tree plantation can be carbon neutral, according to a new study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL). (2019-11-20)
Deep-sea bacteria copy their neighbors' diet
A new group of symbiotic bacteria in deep-sea mussels surprises with the way they fix carbon: They use the Calvin cycle to turn carbon into tasty food. (2019-11-19)
Rare gas find solves puzzle of Southern Africa's soaring landscape
The discovery of gases released from deep beneath the Earth's crust could help to explain Southern Africa's unusual landscape, a study suggests. (2019-11-19)
Clean carbon nanotubes with superb properties
Scientists at Aalto University, Finland, and Nagoya University, Japan, have found a new way to make ultra-clean carbon nanotube transistors with superior semiconducting properties. (2019-11-19)
Deep brain stimulation safer for patients with new MRI compatible electrode
Carbon electrodes will last longer than metal when embedded in the brain of patients with Parkinson's and tremors, and won't be affected by MRI. (2019-11-19)
Atomically dispersed Ni is coke-resistant for dry reforming of methane
Scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have now developed completely coke-resistant Ni-based single-atom catalyst (SAC). (2019-11-15)
The forests of the Amazon are an important carbon sink
The world's tropical forests store huge quantities of carbon in their biomass and thus constitute an important carbon sink. (2019-11-15)
Tailor-made carbon helps pinpoint hereditary diseases and correct medication dosage
Researchers can now obtain more accurate information than ever before on the structure and surface chemistry of carbon. (2019-11-14)
Chemists use light to build biologically active compounds
Many biologically active molecules, including synthetic drugs, contain a central, nitrogen-containing chemical structure with a three-dimensional shape. (2019-11-14)
Catchment geology rules freshwater plant communities
Whether freshwater plant communities use carbon dioxide or bicarbonate for photosynthesis is largely related to the bicarbonate concentration in their local environment, according to a new study, the first global evaluation of bicarbonate use among aquatic plants. (2019-11-14)
ASU study shows some aquatic plants depend on the landscape for photosynthesis
ASU researchers found that not only are freshwater aquatic plants affected by climate, they are also shaped by the surrounding landscape. (2019-11-14)
FSU researchers develop thin heat shield for superfast aircraft
The world of aerospace increasingly relies on carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites to build the structures of satellites, rockets and jet aircraft. (2019-11-14)
Something old, something new in the ocean's blue
Microbiologists at the Max Planck Institutes in Marburg and Bremen have discovered a new metabolic process in the ocean. (2019-11-13)
Tuna carbon ratios reveal shift in food web
The ratio of carbon isotopes in three common species of tuna has changed substantially since 2000, suggesting major shifts are also taking place in the phytoplankton populations that form the basis of the ocean's food web, according to a new international study involving Duke University researchers. (2019-11-13)
How everyday products are supercharging landfill gas, and what that means
Synthetic compounds increasingly used in everyday products like shampoo and motor oil are finding their way into landfills and supercharging the biogas those landfills produce, researchers at the University of Michigan have found. (2019-11-13)
Mysteries behind interstellar buckyballs finally answered
Mimicking conditions thought to exist around dying stars, researchers discovered a mechanism that could explain why planetary nebulae are teeming with complex carbon molecules. (2019-11-13)
Rational transparent conductor design provides a boost to carbon nanotubes application
An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have rationally designed a novel p-type flexible transparent conductor using single-walled carbon nanotubes. (2019-11-13)
Carbon dots make calcium easier to track
Prof. DONG Wenfei's research group from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology (SIBET) has developed a new type of fluorescent carbon dot that can effectively detect calcium levels in cells. (2019-11-12)
Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up
As bacteria adapt to hotter temperatures, they speed up their respiration rate and release more carbon, potentially accelerating climate change. (2019-11-12)
New Pitt research finds carbon nanotubes show a love/hate relationship with water
New research in the journal Carbon reveals that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a coating can both repel and hold water in place, a useful property for applications like printing, spectroscopy, water transport, or harvesting surfaces. (2019-11-12)
Finding common ground for scientists and policymakers on soil carbon and climate change
In an opinion published in Nature Sustainability, a group of scientists argue that public debate about the role of soil carbon in battling climate change is undermining the potential for policymakers to implement policies that build soil carbon for other environmental and agricultural benefits. (2019-11-11)
Coastlines' contribution to climate change might have been underestimated
Permafrost coasts make up about one third of the Earth's total coastline. (2019-11-08)
Arctic shifts to a carbon source due to winter soil emissions
A NASA-funded study suggests winter carbon emissions in the Arctic may be adding more carbon into the atmosphere each year than is taken up by Arctic vegetation, marking a stark reversal for a region that has captured and stored carbon for tens of thousands of years. (2019-11-08)
Plants and fungi together could slow climate change
A new global assessment shows that human impacts have greatly reduced plant-fungus symbioses, which play a key role in sequestering carbon in soils. (2019-11-07)
Investigation of oceanic 'black carbon' uncovers mystery in global carbon cycle
An unexpected finding published today in Nature Communications challenges a long-held assumption about the origin of oceanic black coal, and introduces a tantalizing new mystery: If oceanic black carbon is significantly different from the black carbon found in rivers, where did it come from? (2019-11-07)
CO biosynthesis required for the assembly of the active site in NiFe-hydrogenase
The research group including researchers of National Institutes of Natural Sciences (ExCELLS/IMS), and Osaka University have revealed the detail mechanism of the biosynthesis of carbon monoxide essential for the maturation of the active site of NiFe-hydrogenase. (2019-11-07)
Carbon dioxide capture and use could become big business
Capturing carbon dioxide and turning it into commercial products, such as fuels or construction materials, could become a new global industry, according to a study by researchers from UCLA, the University of Oxford and five other institutions. (2019-11-06)
Scientists create 'artificial leaf' that turns carbon into fuel
Scientists have created an 'artificial leaf' to fight climate change by inexpensively converting harmful carbon dioxide (CO2) into a useful alternative fuel. (2019-11-04)
Lost trees hugely overrated as environmental threat, study finds
Cutting down trees inevitably leads to more carbon in the environment, but deforestation's contributions to climate change are vastly overestimated, according to a new study. (2019-11-04)
Sea levels to continue rising after Paris agreement emission pledges expire in 2030
Sea levels will continue to rise around the world long after current carbon emissions pledges made through the Paris climate agreement are met and global temperatures stabilize, a new study indicates. (2019-11-04)
Satellites are key to monitoring ocean carbon
Satellites now play a key role in monitoring carbon levels in the oceans, but we are only just beginning to understand their full potential. (2019-11-03)
Dietary fiber effectively purifies carbon nanotubes
A dietary fiber can help separate out semiconducting carbon nanotubes used for making transistors for flexible electronics. (2019-11-02)
Vicinal reaction: A radical strategy for linking three organic groups together
A Japanese research team at Kanazawa University developed a reaction for creating functionalized ketones. (2019-10-31)
Traffic exhaust at residential address increases the risk of stroke
High levels of traffic exhaust at one's residence increases the risk of stroke even in low-pollution environments, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and other universities in Sweden. (2019-10-30)
Carbon bomb: Study says climate impact from loss of intact tropical forests grossly underreported
A new study in the journal Science Advances says that carbon impacts from the loss of intact tropical forests has been grossly underreported. (2019-10-30)
Intact forest loss 'six times worse' for climate
The impact of losing intact tropical forests is more devastating on the climate than previously thought, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2019-10-30)
Two million-year-old ice provides snapshot of Earth's greenhouse gas history
Two million-year old ice from Antarctica recently uncovered by a team of researchers provides a clearer picture into the connections between greenhouse gases and climate in ancient times and will help scientists understand future climate change. (2019-10-30)
Where to install renewable energy in US to achieve greatest benefits
A new Harvard study shows that to achieve the biggest improvements in public health and the greatest benefits from renewable energy, wind turbines should be installed in the Upper Midwest and solar power should be installed in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions. (2019-10-29)
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