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Current Carbon News and Events, Carbon News Articles.
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New study sparks fresh call for seagrass preservation
An increase in carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 5 million cars a year has been caused by the loss of seagrass meadows around the Australian coastline since the 1950s. (2020-07-07)
Agriculture - a climate villain? Maybe not!
The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) claims that agriculture is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases, and is thus by many observers considered as a climate villain. (2020-07-07)
Conservation agriculture increases carbon sequestration in extensive crops
A study performed by UCO (University of Cordoba) and IFAPA (Institute of Agricultural Research and Training) analyzed the potential of no-till farming in order to achieve the aims of the 4perMille initiative, that seeks to increase the amount of organic carbon in soil. (2020-07-07)
Light a critical factor in limiting carbon uptake, even in the north
A new Columbia Engineering study demonstrates that even when temperatures warm and cold stress is limited, light is still a major factor in limiting carbon uptake of northern high latitudes. (2020-07-06)
Study: Dying stars breathe life into Earth
As dying stars take their final few breaths of life, they gently sprinkle their ashes into the cosmos through the magnificent planetary nebulae. (2020-07-06)
White dwarfs reveal new insights into the origin of carbon in the universe
A new analysis of white dwarf stars supports their role as a key source of carbon in galaxies. (2020-07-06)
Arctic plants may not provide predicted carbon sequestration potential
The environmental benefits of taller, shrubbier tundra plants in the Arctic may be overstated, according to new research involving the University of Stirling. (2020-07-02)
Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, are advancing gas membrane materials to expand practical technology options for reducing industrial carbon emissions. (2020-07-02)
A shake-up in cell culturing: Flame sterilization may affect the culture
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that flame-sterilizing shake-flasks, to avoid introducing microbial contaminants, considerably increases the carbon dioxide concentration in the flasks. (2020-07-01)
Building a harder diamond
Scientists at the University of Tsukuba create a theoretical carbon-based material that would be even harder than diamond. (2020-07-01)
In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production
Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. (2020-07-01)
No touching: Skoltech researchers find contactless way to measure thickness of carbon nanotube films
Scientists from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and Finland have figured out a non-invasive way to measure the thickness of single-walled carbon nanotube films, which may find applications in a wide variety of fields from solar energy to smart textiles. (2020-06-30)
Size matters for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage
New research has shown that Drax power station in North Yorkshire is the optimal site for the carbon capture and storage facilities that will be needed reduce carbon emissions and achieve the targets of 2016 Paris Climate Agreement. (2020-06-29)
Agricultural fires in central Africa light up in Suomi NPP satellite image
Fires have spread across the majority of the landscape in Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo in this NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite image using the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument from June 25, 2020. (2020-06-26)
Carbon cycling in wet soils
Testing microbial activity in soil columns helps researchers understand how carbon is stored in soils that are periodically waterlogged. (2020-06-25)
Papers concludes that incentives to afforestation can be harmful to the environment
'Through a counterfactual analysis, we showed that between 1986 and 2011 the incentives to afforestation in Chile caused an increase in forest plantations, but reduced the extent of native forests', explains the main conclusions of the paper Impacts of Chilean forest subsidies on forest cover, carbon and biodiversity, published by the journal Nature Sustainability. (2020-06-25)
Alternative to nitrogen: Oxygen plasma can improve the properties of electrode materials
A group of scientists from Skoltech and Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) showed that nitrogen is not the only element that can help enhance the specific capacitance of supercapacitors. (2020-06-25)
KIST develops eco-friendly, flame-retardant carbon plastic ideal for recycling
A flame-retardant carbon-fiber-reinforced composite material has been developed. Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team from its Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, headed by Dr. (2020-06-24)
Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines
Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life. (2020-06-24)
Steep NYC traffic toll would reduce gridlock, pollution
Cornell University and the City College of New York research shows that by creating steep tolls for cars to enter Manhattan, traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced. (2020-06-24)
Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation
A study, led by the University of York, has found that patches of protected forest on oil palm plantations play an important role in helping to conserve endangered species including hornbill birds and dipterocarp trees. (2020-06-22)
Study: Planting new forests is part of but not the whole solution to climate change
The large-scale planting of new forests in previously tree-free areas, a practice known as afforestation, is hailed as an efficient way to remove excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere -- a so-called natural climate solution. (2020-06-22)
Research sheds new light on the role of sea ice in controlling atmospheric carbon levels
A new study has highlighted the crucial role that sea ice across the Southern Ocean played in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during times of past climate change, and could provide a critical resource for developing future climate change models. (2020-06-22)
Seasonal sea ice changes hold clues to controlling CO2 levels, ancient ice shows
New research has shed light on the role sea ice plays in managing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. (2020-06-22)
Mysterious climate change
New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past. (2020-06-22)
The exhaust gas from a power plant can be recovered and used as a raw reaction material
A Japanese research group developed a new technology that can drastically conserve the energy used to capture CO2 from gases exhausted from a concentrated source such as thermal power plants. (2020-06-19)
Two-dimensional carbon networks
Lithium-ion batteries usually contain graphitic carbons as anode materials. Scientists have investigated the carbonic nanoweb graphdiyne as a novel two-dimensional carbon network for its suitability in battery applications. (2020-06-18)
Forests can be risky climate investments to offset greenhouse gas emissions
Given the tremendous ability of forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, some governments are counting on planted forests as offsets for greenhouse gas emissions -- a sort of climate investment. (2020-06-18)
Crop residue decisions affect soil life
New findings share how prescribed fire and no-till management impact soil microbes. (2020-06-17)
High performance sodium-ion capacitors based on Nb2O5 nanotubes@carbon cloth
Nb2O5 nanotubes and nanowire-to-nanotube homojunctions were directly grown on carbon cloth (CC) from a simple hydrothermal process by adjusting the pH value and adding pyridine as growth regulator. (2020-06-17)
Stocks of vulnerable carbon twice as high where permafrost subsidence is factored in
Twice as much carbon in permafrost is vulnerable to microbial respiration when researchers from Northern Arizona University accounted for subsidence, the gradual sinking of terrain caused by loss of ice and soil mass. (2020-06-17)
16 new papers describe discoveries at long-term deep-sea research site off California
A recent special issue of the journal Deep-Sea Research II features 16 new papers about MBARI's long-term, deep-sea research site Station M. (2020-06-16)
Carbon emission from permafrost soils underestimated by 14%
Picture 500 million cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon -- about 1,000 petagrams, or one billion metric tons - -is locked away in Arctic permafrost. (2020-06-15)
A carbon sink shrinks in the arctic
Ice melts in the Arctic Ocean were thought to be drawing large amounts of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, acting as a carbon sink and helping to mitigate greenhouse gases. (2020-06-15)
Liquid metals break down organic fuels into ultra-thin graphitic sheets
For the first time, FLEET researchers at UNSW, Sydney show the synthesis of ultra-thin graphitic materials at room temperature using organic fuels (which can be as simple as basic alcohols such as ethanol). (2020-06-10)
Considering health when switching to cleaner electricity
Power plants that burn coal and other fossil fuels emit not only planet-warming carbon dioxide, but also pollutants linked to breathing problems and premature death. (2020-06-10)
Bedrock type under forests greatly affects tree growth, species, carbon storage
A forest's ability to store carbon depends significantly on the bedrock beneath, according to Penn State researchers who studied forest productivity, composition and associated physical characteristics of rocks in the Appalachian ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania. (2020-06-10)
Climate change: Warm springtime's unwelcome legacy
A new study shows that the severe impact of the summer drought that hit Europe in 2018 was partly due to the spring heatwave that preceded it, which triggered early and rapid plant growth, depleting soil moisture. (2020-06-10)
Engineers find neat way to turn waste carbon dioxide into useful material
Making catalysts to convert waste carbon dioxide into useful industrial products has been expensive and complicated -- until now. (2020-06-10)
Renewable fuel from carbon dioxide with the aid of solar energy
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are attempting to convert carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to fuel using energy from sunlight. (2020-06-09)
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