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Current Cartilage News and Events

Current Cartilage News and Events, Cartilage News Articles.
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Magnetic field and hydrogels could be used to grow new cartilage
Instead of using synthetic materials, Penn Medicine study shows magnets could be used to arrange cells to grow new tissues (2020-10-19)
Gel instrumental in 3D bioprinting biological tissues
The eventual creation of replacement biological parts requires fully three-dimensional capabilities that two-dimensional and three-dimensional thin-film bioprinting cannot supply. (2020-10-16)
Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)
Study upends understanding about joint injuries
An injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can lead to severe osteoarthritis in both animal and human patients. (2020-10-14)
Researchers use lab-grown tissue grafts for personalized joint replacement
A multidisciplinary team from Columbia Engineering, Columbia's College of Dental Medicine and Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University, LaCell LLC, and Obatala Sciences has now bioengineered living cartilage-bone temporomandibular joint grafts, precisely matched to the recipient, both biologically and anatomically. (2020-10-14)
Tissue grafts of both bone and cartilage could regenerate damage to a crucial jaw joint
Scientists have engineered tissue grafts that, in pigs, regenerated both bone and cartilage in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), a part of the jaw that can cause debilitating pain and disability when damaged. (2020-10-14)
Osteoarthritis biomarker could help 300 million people worldwide
University of South Australia researchers are a step closer to finding a new biomarker for osteoarthritis, a painful condition which affects more than 300 million people worldwide. (2020-10-11)
When it comes to arthritic bone spurs, stem cells hurt instead of heal
The same stem cells that heal broken bones can also generate arthritic bone spurs called osteophytes, according to a new study in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases. (2020-10-09)
Cell therapy designed to treat inflammatory bowel disease
The UPV/EHU's NanoBioCel research group has for many years been developing systems enabling cells to be used as drugs. (2020-09-28)
Artificial intelligence detects osteoarthritis years before it develops
Researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm that can pick up on subtle signs of osteoarthritis - too abstract to register in the eye of a trained radiologist - on an MRI scan taken years before symptom onset. (2020-09-21)
Ancient bony fish forces rethink of how sharks evolved
Sharks' non-bony skeletons were thought to be the template before bony internal skeletons evolved, but a new fossil discovery suggests otherwise. (2020-09-07)
How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility. (2020-08-24)
New approach to treating osteoarthritis advances
Injections of a natural 'energy' molecule prompted regrowth of almost half of the cartilage lost with aging in knees, a new study in rodents shows. (2020-08-10)
Bone drug may be beneficial for knee osteoarthritis
Bisphosphonates (a class of drugs that prevent the loss of bone density and used to treat osteoporosis and similar diseases) appear to be safe and beneficial for osteoarthritis patients. (2020-08-05)
Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)
Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)
Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution
A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past. (2020-07-20)
Novel bone imaging approach provides insights into the progression of knee osteoarthritis
A new approach to functional bone imaging has established that bone metabolism is abnormally elevated in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (2020-07-13)
From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. (2020-06-26)
The injury rate of dominant leg of soccer players is identical with the non-dominant one
The severity of knee joints damage in soccer players depends on their age and career duration, and the condition of articular cartilage and meniscus of the dominant and the non-dominant leg does not differ. (2020-06-22)
A rare heart bone is discovered in chimpanzees
Experts from the University of Nottingham have discovered that some chimpanzees have a bone in their heart, which could be vital in managing their health and conservation. (2020-06-10)
Improved MRI scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments
An algorithm which analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis. (2020-06-09)
Researchers develop 3D-printable material that mimics biological tissues
University of Colorado Denver researchers are the first to 3D print a complex, porous lattice structure using liquid crystal elastomers creating devices that can mimic cartilage and other biological tissues. (2020-06-08)
Researchers identify secretion mechanisms for a protein necessary for maintaining healthy connective
Researchers have discovered that a defective form of the protein aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is retained in cells and induces cellular stress. (2020-06-03)
Human growth hormone treatment after ACL injury may prevent loss of muscle strength
A new study finds the use of HGH treatment in patients that have undergone ACL reconstructive surgery may prevent the loss of muscle strength and weakness. (2020-05-27)
Combinatorial screening approach opens path to better-quality joint cartilage
High-throughput platform identifies complex conditions with biomaterial compositions, and mechanical and chemical stimuli that help stem cells produce more robust cartilage. (2020-05-22)
Texas A&M lab engineers 3D-functional bone tissues
Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar, associate professor, has developed a highly printable bioink as a platform to generate anatomical-scale functional tissues. (2020-05-19)
Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood. (2020-05-12)
Use of a homozygous G608G progeria mouse model for degenerative joint diseases research
In a study published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, researchers led by Ara Nazarian, PhD, a principal investigator in the Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies at BIDMC, investigated the musculoskeletal phenotype of the homozygous G608G BAC-transgenic progeria mouse model, developed at Dr. (2020-05-11)
(Re)generation next: Novel strategy to develop scaffolds for joint tissue regeneration
In Japan, an increase in the aging population has exacerbated the demand for regenerative medicine to address increasingly common diseases, such as knee osteoarthritis. (2020-03-30)
Stem cells and nerves interact in tissue regeneration and cancer progression
Researchers at the University of Zurich show that different stem cell populations are innervated in distinct ways. (2020-03-23)
Combined tissue engineering provides new hope for spinal disc herniations
A promising new tissue engineering approach may one day improve outcomes for patients who have undergone discectomy -- the primary surgical remedy for spinal disc herniations. (2020-03-11)
Producing human tissue in space
The University of Zurich has sent adult human stem cells to the International Space Station (ISS). (2020-03-07)
Cartilage cells, chromosomes and DNA preserved in 75 million-year-old baby duck-billed dinosaur
In a paper published online in National Science Review, an international team of scientists present evidence of fossilized cell nuclei and chromosomes within preserved cartilage in a baby duck-billed dinosaur. (2020-02-28)
Bone or cartilage? Presence of fatty acids determines skeletal stem cell development
In the event of a bone fracture, fatty acids in our blood signal to stem cells that they have to develop into bone-forming cells. (2020-02-26)
Grooves hold promise for sophisticated healing
Rice University bioengineers print 3D implants with layered cells destined to become distinct combinations of tissue, like bone and cartilage. (2020-02-04)
A way to look younger is right under your nose, UCLA-led study finds
Rhinoplasty, or cosmetic nose surgery, may make a woman look up to three years younger, according to a new study led by researchers at UCLA that used a type of artificial intelligence known as machine learning. (2020-01-27)
Drug combo reverses arthritis in rats
Salk researchers have discovered that a powerful combination of 2 experimental drugs reverses the cellular and molecular signs of osteoarthritis in rats as well as in isolated human cartilage cells. (2020-01-21)
'Swiss cheese' bones could be cause of unexplained low back pain
In experiments with genetically engineered and old mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the vast majority of low back pain in people may be rooted in an overgrowth of pain-sensing nerves into spinal cartilaginous tissue. (2020-01-13)
MIV-711 not associated with pain reduction, but may reduce disease progression in osteoarthritis
MIV-711, a novel selective cathepsin K inhibitor, was not more effective than placebo for reducing pain related to knee osteoarthritis. (2019-12-30)
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