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Current Cell biology News and Events

Current Cell biology News and Events, Cell biology News Articles.
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Researchers use genetic profiles to predict obesity risk at birth
Researchers have come up with a scoring system based on genetic markers that predicts an individual's inborn risk for obesity. (2019-04-18)
Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells
New North Carolina State University research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells. (2019-04-18)
Cell biology: The complexity of division by two
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division. (2019-04-15)
Ancient DNA reveals new branches of the Denisovan family tree
A study examining DNA fragments passed down from these ancient hominins to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea now suggests that the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, separated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years. (2019-04-11)
Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners
When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. (2019-04-11)
Rutgers scientists discover new role for sensory signals in the brain
Learning how to tie a shoe or shoot a basketball isn't easy, but the brain somehow integrates sensory signals that are critical to coordinating movements so you can get it right. (2019-04-11)
New electron microscopy technique limits membrane destruction
Researchers at Purdue University have created an electron microscopy technique termed 'cryoAPEX' that accurately tracks membrane proteins in a well-preserved cell. (2019-04-10)
Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach
Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI, today published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq). (2019-04-09)
Mapping cellular diversity by looking for common topics of gene control
A Belgian team of computational biologists led by Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) has developed a new bioinformatics method called cisTopic. (2019-04-09)
Specialist enzymes make E. coli antibiotic resistant at low pH
New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that many cell wall enzymes that were previously considered 'redundant' are actually specialists that ensure maximal growth across different environments. (2019-04-09)
Cell death may be triggered by 'hit-and-run' interaction
A 'hit-and-run' interaction between two proteins could be an important trigger for cell death, according to new research from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers. (2019-04-09)
Moffitt researchers develop tool to estimate genetic diversity and ancestry of cell lines
It is important that scientists have proper tools and model systems to study how these variations affect cancer development and devise effective therapies for patients of all genetic backgrounds. (2019-04-05)
Unjamming the genome after DNA damage
A protein complex that is involved in nearly every step in the regulatory control of gene expression in cells has now been shown also to play a key role in clearing potential traffic jams in the production of RNA. (2019-04-05)
Plants grow less in hotter temperatures
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report how two transcription factors, ANAC044 and ANAC085, pause the cell cycle when cells experience stress. (2019-04-04)
Screw-shaped bird sperm swim faster -- but it comes at a cost
New research from the Natural History Museum in Oslo suggests that bird sperm cells with a spiral or screw-like shape swim faster than straighter sperm -- but that the spiral shape also makes them more fragile. (2019-04-04)
Ancient, four-legged whale with otter-like features found along the coast of Peru
Cetaceans, the group including whales and dolphins, originated in south Asia more than 50 million years ago from a small, four-legged, hoofed ancestor. (2019-04-04)
How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying. (2019-04-04)
Study identifies new approach to repairing damaged peripheral nervous system
A new understanding of cell migration may eventually help in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases -- and even allow children to 'get out of their wheelchairs and live an enhanced quality of life.' (2019-04-02)
Researchers discover how tumor-killing immune cells attack lymphomas in living mice
In a study that will be published April 1 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from the Institut Pasteur and INSERM reveal that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can induce tumor regression by directly targeting and killing cancer cells, uncovering new details of how these immune cells work and how their effectiveness could be improved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other B cell cancers. (2019-04-01)
A new accurate computational method designed to enhance drug target stability
Scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), and the University of Southern California (USC) have developed a new computational method for the design of thermally stable G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) that are of great help in creating new drugs. (2019-03-29)
How mosquitoes smell human sweat (and new ways to stop them)
Female mosquitoes are known to rely on an array of sensory information to find people to bite, picking up on carbon dioxide, body odor, heat, moisture, and visual cues. (2019-03-28)
In mice, single population of stem cells contributes to lifelong hippocampal neurogenesis
In the latest update in the field of adult neurogenesis, a team of researchers has shown in mice that a single lineage of neural progenitors contributes to embryonic, early postnatal, and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and that these cells are continuously generated throughout a lifetime. (2019-03-28)
Introducing a kinder, gentler way to blow holes in cells
Getting big molecules into cells isn't easy, and it isn't easy on the cells, either. (2019-03-28)
How nerve cells control misfolded proteins
Researchers have identified a protein complex that marks misfolded proteins, stops them from interacting with other proteins in the cell and directs them towards disposal. (2019-03-27)
Scientists shine new light on how cells coordinate eye growth in fish
New insight on how cells work together to control growth in the eyes of fish has been published today in eLife. (2019-03-26)
ELSI scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells
Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. (2019-03-25)
Western bias in human genetic studies is 'both scientifically damaging and unfair'
Despite efforts to include diversity in research, people of European ancestry continue to be vastly overrepresented and ethnically diverse populations largely excluded from human genomics research, according to the authors of a commentary published March 21 in a special issue of the journal Cell on human genetics. (2019-03-21)
Ejecting flagella could help microbes save energy during nutrient depletion
In favorable conditions, many bacteria propel themselves to food sources and other sites of interest using whip-like molecular propellers known as flagella. (2019-03-19)
Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes -- watch what happens
Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. (2019-03-14)
Researchers find epigenetic loss that changes how cells obtain energy from cancer
It has been known for decades that cancer cells have an altered metabolism and it is seen in several biochemical pathways and in particular, in the way they get energy for their survival. (2019-03-14)
Europe's last hunter-gatherers were more diverse than thought, DNA evidence suggests
The genetic legacy of European hunter-gatherers who lived thousands of years ago is more complex than had been thought, according to new genomic evidence reported in Current Biology on March 14. (2019-03-14)
New cell subtypes classified in mouse brain
An international team has created a new way to classify neurons in the mouse brain. (2019-03-13)
FSU researchers discover a novel protein degradation pathway
A Florida State University research team how a type of protein that is embedded in the inner nuclear membrane clears out of the system once it has served its purpose. (2019-03-12)
Selfish genetic elements amplify inflammation and age-related diseases
Researchers from the University of Rochester show that LINE1 retrotransposons, a class of selfish genetic elements, become more active with age and may cause age-related diseases by triggering inflammation. (2019-03-11)
Cell study reveals key mechanism linked to healthy development
Researchers have uncovered details of the role played by a key biological component involved in healthy cell development. (2019-03-07)
Researchers discover a new mechanism used by bacteria to evade antibiotics
Antibiotics survival mechanism: UC San Diego researchers have discovered an unexpected mechanism that allows bacteria to defend themselves against antibiotics, a surprise finding that could lead to retooled drugs to treat infectious diseases. (2019-03-07)
Gene transcription machinery constrains DNA movements, study suggests
Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. (2019-03-01)
Scientists rejuvenate stem cells in the aging brain of mice
Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. (2019-03-01)
Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level
Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. (2019-03-01)
Turning them on, turning them off -- how to control stem cells
Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells. (2019-02-28)
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