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Current Cell biology News and Events

Current Cell biology News and Events, Cell biology News Articles.
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A biologist and a historian are looking for art to trace fruit and vegetable evolution
Plant geneticists seeking to understand the history of plant-based foods can decode the genomes of ancient crops from well-preserved samples. (2020-07-14)
Breast cancer cells turn killer immune cells into allies
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. (2020-07-09)
Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus. (2020-07-09)
15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. (2020-07-09)
Enzymes as double agents: New mechanism discovered in protein modification
Proteins take on an important function in photosynthesis. In order to be able to work purposefully, they change their chemical form after they have been produced in a cell. (2020-07-07)
Neurobiology -- How much oxygen does the brain need?
The brain has a high energy demand and reacts very sensitively to oxygen deficiency. (2020-07-06)
Multisample technique to analyze cell adhesion
An assay for imaging the physical interactions between multiple cell populations could help cancer research and treatment assessment. (2020-07-06)
Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went "viral" across Canada
With the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went ''viral'' across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending. (2020-07-02)
A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Scientists from the USC Stem Cell laboratories of Neil Segil and Justin Ichida are whispering the secrets of a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. (2020-07-01)
USC scientists examine the impact of a very specific defect in DNA replication
The new lab study finds an unexpected glitch in a gene that supervises mitosis, one that has important implications for cancer treatment. (2020-06-29)
Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Dolphins can learn new skills from their fellow dolphins. That's the conclusion of a new study reported in the journal Current Biology on June 25. (2020-06-25)
Treating leukaemia more effectively
Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common kind of cancer in children. (2020-06-24)
Neurons thrive even when malnourished
When animal, insect or human embryos grow in a malnourished environment, their developing nervous systems get first pick of any available nutrients so that new neurons can be made. (2020-06-24)
Starved cancer cells became more sensitive to chemotherapy
By preventing sugar uptake, researchers succeeded in increasing the cancer cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic treatment. (2020-06-23)
Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth
When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. (2020-06-22)
Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
EPFL biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division. (2020-06-22)
Early clinical trial supports tumor cell-based vaccine for mantle cell lymphoma
A phase I/II clinical trial by researchers at Stanford University suggests that vaccines prepared from a patient's own tumor cells may prevent the incurable blood cancer mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) from returning after treatment. (2020-06-19)
Yale scientists solve a thorny problem
''Why do plants have thorns?'' is an easy question: The thorns help protect against hungry animals that like to munch on the plants. (2020-06-18)
Researchers uncover drivers of healthy gut maintenance
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have found two genes that regulate the differentiation of stem cells in the small intestine, offering valuable insight into how the body develops and maintains a healthy gut. (2020-06-15)
An ion channel senses cell swelling and helps cells to choose a response
Liz Haswell's lab at WashU provides insight into how plants sense and respond (including suicide) to mechanical signals, such as cell swelling, rather than chemicals signals, such as nutrients or growth factors. (2020-06-11)
How COVID-19 has altered sleep in the United States and Europe
Two studies in Current Biology show that relaxed school and work schedules and more time spent at home has led people to sleep more on average with less 'social jetlag' as indicated by a reduced shift in sleep timing and duration on work days versus free days. (2020-06-10)
Study identifies network of genes that directs trachea and oesophagus development
A new study reporting how a network of genes directs the development of the trachea and oesophagus in mice has been published today in eLife. (2020-06-09)
Study by NUI Galway researchers into DNA biology could impact future anti-cancer therapies
A study by the Centre for Chromosome Biology at NUI Galway, Ireland, in partnership with the University of Zurich, has uncovered new insights into how the replication of DNA occurs which can be applied to help develop novel cancer treatments. (2020-06-09)
T cell immunity in the elderly
A study by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) expands the understanding of the molecular pathways that control T cell function and survival and how it relates to declining T cell immunity in the elderly. (2020-06-05)
How cells solve their identity crisis
Cancer is often the result of DNA mutations or problems with how cells divide, which can lead to cells 'forgetting' what type of cell they are or how to function properly. (2020-06-04)
'Terminator' protein halts cancer-causing cellular processes
New research from the lab of Hening Lin, professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, finds that a protein called TiPARP acts as a terminator for several cancer-causing transcription factors, including HIF-1, which is implicated in many cancers, including breast cancer. (2020-06-03)
Hairy, lab-grown human skin cell model could advance hair loss research
A new, hair-sprouting dollop of human skin created in the lab might one day help prevent hair loss. (2020-06-03)
Cancer cells cause inflammation to protect themselves from viruses
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered how cancer cells protect themselves from viruses that are harmful to tumors but not to healthy cells. (2020-06-01)
HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus collectively through the nuclear endocytosis-like pathway
How HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus through the undersized nuclear pore remains mysterious. (2020-06-01)
Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes
The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant -- which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria -- during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites. (2020-05-28)
Caveolin binding motif in Na/K-ATPase required for stem cell differentiation in animals
New findings reveal the importance of the Na/K-ATPase protein in stem cell differentiation and organogenesis, in a study led by scientists at Marshall University that involves the scaffolding function of the Na/K-ATPase. (2020-05-27)
Directed protein evolution with CRISPR-Cas9
New area of application for gene scissors: Optimized proteins for biomedical research. (2020-05-26)
Nanodevices show how cells change with time, by tracking from the inside
For the first time, scientists have introduced minuscule tracking devices directly into the interior of mammalian cells, giving an unprecedented peek into the processes that govern the beginning of development. (2020-05-26)
Unique insight into development of the human brain: Model of the early embryonic brain
Stem cell researchers from the University of Copenhagen have designed a model of an early embryonic brain. (2020-05-25)
Algal genome provides insights into first land plants
Cornell researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many clues to how aquatic plants first colonized land. (2020-05-22)
Cell reproduction dogma challenged
Meiosis is essential to sexual reproduction. For almost 15 years, it has been commonly held that retinoic acid, a molecule derived from vitamin A, triggers meiosis in mammalian germ cells. (2020-05-22)
Scientists identify gene linked to thinness that may help resist weight gain
In a study publishing May 21 in the journal Cell, researchers use a genetic database of more than 47,000 people in Estonia to identify a gene linked to thinness that may play a role in resisting weight gain in metabolically healthy thin people. (2020-05-21)
MIPT biophysicists found a way to take a peek at how membrane receptors work
MIPT biophysicists explained ways to visualize membrane receptors in their different states. (2020-05-21)
A new understanding of everyday cellular processes
We use cells to breathe, to moderate body temperature, to grow and many other every day processes, however the cells in these processes are so complex its left scientists perplexed into how they develop in different environments. (2020-05-20)
New liver cancer research targets non-cancer cells to blunt tumor growth
'Senotherapy,' a treatment that uses small molecule drugs to target ''senescent'' cells, or those cells that no longer undergo cell division, blunts liver tumor progression in animal models according to new research from a team led by Celeste Simon, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute. (2020-05-20)
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