Current Cell death News and Events

Current Cell death News and Events, Cell death News Articles.
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Stem cell-based screen identifies potential new treatments
In a recent study published in Stem Cell Reports, Seba Almedawar, PhD, and colleagues with the Center for Regenerative Therapies TU Dresden, Germany, used induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the skin of healthy donors and of patients with retinitis pigmentosa to find drugs with the potential to enhance RPE phagocytosis. (2020-11-25)

Replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 in 3D
Researchers have studied SARS-CoV-2 replication in cells and obtained detailed insights into the alterations induced in infected cells. This information is essential to guide the development of urgently needed therapeutic strategies for suppressing viral replication and induced pathology. (2020-11-23)

High blood sugar could increase COVID-19 death risk for non-diabetics, says study
Abnormally high blood sugar may worsen outcomes and mortality rates for COVID-19 patients, including those without diabetes, according to major research published in the peer-reviewed open access journal Annals of Medicine. (2020-11-23)

Many unresolved questions remain regarding T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2
T cell responses are critical for providing early control and clearance of many viral infections, but there remain many unknowns concerning T cell immunity in COVID-19. Some T cell responses may even have a detrimental impact on the clinical outcome and contribute to long COVID, a phenomenon that affects roughly 10% of COVID-19 patients, causing them to experience an array of symptoms for a month or longer. (2020-11-18)

In the lab, St. Jude scientists identify possible COVID-19 treatment
Immunologists have determined the process driving life-threatening inflammation, lung damage and organ failure in patients with COVID-19, sepsis and other inflammatory disorders suggesting possible treatment using existing drugs. (2020-11-18)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Animation reveals secrets of critical tumour protein
The latest animation technology has revealed the molecular detail of how our bodies are protected from cancer by a key 'tumour suppressor' protein called p53. (2020-11-11)

New analysis finds lung cancer screening reduces rates of lung cancer-specific death
Low-dose CT screening methods may prevent one death per 250 at-risk adults screened, according to a meta-analysis of eight randomized controlled clinical trials of lung cancer screening. Researchers at the University of Georgia analyzed the health outcomes of 90,275 patients, comparing those who were screened versus those who received usual medical care or chest x-rays. (2020-11-10)

Technique to regenerate optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment
Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. (2020-11-05)

HKUST scientists make breakthrough discovery of new therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's
An HKUST team have identified several new potential molecular targets in endothelial cells and microglia for AD drug development. (2020-11-05)

Subarachnoid hemorrhage causes more deaths among middle-aged women than other strokes
According to a recently published Finnish study, subarachnoid hemorrhage, which has so far been considered a relatively rare type of stroke, causes a significant share of all fatalities among middle-aged people. The number of, in particular, middle-aged women whose death is caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage is higher than the corresponding figure for cerebral infarction, a much more common disorder measured by the number of cases for all ages. (2020-11-05)

Promising therapeutic approach against COPD
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common and deadliest diseases worldwide. Until today, COPD is not curable. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now succeeded in curing COPD in mice exposed to chronic cigarette smoke. Their goal is to test the novel therapeutic approach in human clinical trials over the next few years. (2020-11-04)

For plant and animal immune systems the similarities go beyond sensing
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) and University of Cologne researcher Takaki Maekawa and colleagues have discovered that plants have independently evolved a family of immune proteins that are strikingly similar to animals. (2020-11-02)

Photopharmacology - A light-trigger for the proteasome
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have designed a light-sensitive inhibitor that can control cell division and cell death - and provides a promising approach for studies of essential cellular processes and the development of novel tumor therapies. (2020-10-30)

A patch that could help heal broken hearts
According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide in recent years. During a heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), a blocked artery and the resulting oxygen deprivation cause massive cardiac cell death, blood vessel impairment and inflammation. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a cardiac patch with tiny engineered blood vessels that improved recovery from MI in rats and pigs. (2020-10-28)

Langerhans cells are up to the job, they just need a chance
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that Langerhans cells (LCs) play a crucial role in mucocutaneous acute guest-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Their experiments in mice showed that when the LCs of a recipient were depleted, the formation of mucocutaneous lesions was enhanced because the infiltration of CD8+ T cells was inhibited. Their findings have significant implications for improving blood stem cell transplantation treatments and clinical outcomes for patients. (2020-10-27)

Death rates among people with severe COVID-19 drop by a half in England
Death rates from people with severe COVID-19 in hospital have dropped to around a half of the rate at the peak of the pandemic, new research has revealed. (2020-10-27)

New COVID-19 related genes -- helpful and harmful -- found in massive screen
Researchers at Yale University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard screened hundreds of millions of cells exposed to the COVID-19 and MERS viruses and identified dozens of genes that both enable the viruses to replicate in cells and also those that seem to slam the door on the virus. The pro-viral and anti-viral role of these genes will help guide scientists in development of new therapies to combat COVID-19, the researchers say. (2020-10-26)

Researchers solve 'protein paradox' and suggest way to exploit cancer weakness
Researchers from UCPH have discovered how thus far a mysterious function of the so-called MCM proteins protect the human cells against DNA instability, which can cause devastating diseases including cancer. In addition to their known role as molecular motors of genome duplication, MCM proteins control the speed of this process. How cells manage to constrain the speed of DNA replication has puzzled researchers for decades and has even been called a ''MCM paradox''. (2020-10-22)

Mammography screening saves lives also in older age
Mammography, which is an x-ray picture of the breast, is efficient also for women over the age of 70. For women invited to regular mammography screening over the age of 70, the reduction in mortality rate was significant. This according to a vast new study from Sweden. (2020-10-20)

Peptides+antibiotic combination may result in a more effective treatment for leishmaniasis
A combination of peptides and antibiotics could be key to eliminating the parasite causing leishmaniasis and avoiding the toxicity to people and animals caused by current drugs. The study, coordinated by researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona opens the door to new, more effective treatments against this disease. (2020-10-16)

Monash discoveries suggest new breast cancer treatment
Findings by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers have pointed to a new combination of treatments that may help breast cancer patients with certain gene mutations. (2020-10-15)

Researchers gain new insight on metastatic prostate cancer
An international research team has discovered a principle that explains the metastasising of prostate cancer. When cancer evolves within the prostate, multiple spatially intermixed cancer cell clones are created that may invade the organs surrounding the prostate. However, only one dominant cell clone spreads systemically in the body and creates metastases. In addition, new subcellular clones are often generated in metastases, which pass on to other metastases. (2020-10-08)

The CNIO reprograms CRISPR system in mice to eliminate tumor cells without affecting healthy cells
CNIO researchers destroyed Ewing's sarcoma and chronic myeloid leukaemia tumor cells by using CRISPR to cut out the fusion genes that cause them. For the first time, fusion genes have been selectively and efficiently removed using CRISPR. These genes are attracting a great deal of interest from the research community because they are unique to the tumor cell and are therefore excellent targets for the development of future drugs that only attack the tumor and are harmless for healthy cells. (2020-10-08)

New class of highly effective inhibitors protects against neurodegeneration
Heidelberg University neurobiologists have uncovered how a special receptor can lead to cell death. Their fundamental findings on neurodegenerative processes simultaneously led the researchers to a completely new principle for therapeutic agents. In their experiments on mouse models, they discovered a new class of highly effective inhibitors for protecting nerve cells. This novel class of drugs opens up perspectives to combat currently untreatable diseases of the nervous system. (2020-10-08)

Study shows similar antibody response to key SARS-CoV-2 'spike' protein in COVID-19
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that antibody responses to related to the key 'spike' protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus are similar in COVID-19 patients with and without diabetes, boosting hopes that vaccines involving this same protein will have a high chance of being as effective in vulnerable patients with diabetes as they will be in the general population. (2020-10-08)

Urban air pollution may make COVID-19 more severe for some
As the pandemic persists, COVID-19 has claimed more than 200,000 lives in the United States and damaged the public health system and economy. In a study published on September 21 in the journal The Innovation, researchers at Emory University found that long-term exposure to urban air pollution may have made COVID-19 more deadly. (2020-10-07)

People with Parkinson's disease have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19
A new database analysis of approximately 80,000 patients shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a 30% higher death rate from COVID-19 than people without the neurodegenerative condition. The new analysis of patient data in the TriNetX COVID-19 research network conducted by University of Iowa researchers and published in Movement Disorders suggests that Parkinson's disease is an independent risk factor for dying from COVID-19. (2020-10-01)

Scientists propose immune cocktail therapy to boost cancer-immunity cycle in multiple aspects
A research team led by Prof. TIAN Huayu from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed an innovative immune cocktail therapy that combined ICT along with other therapeutic approaches. The cocktail therapy achieved multiple boosting of the cancer-immunity cycle by utilizing a nano-delivery system. (2020-09-30)

Identified the cellular process by which Cisplatin chemotherapy causes neuronal damage
Cisplatin induces senescence of peripheral neurons through overexpression of the p21 protein, which would explain the neuropathy. (2020-09-29)

Adequate levels of vitamin D reduces complications, death among COVID-19 patients
Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were vitamin D sufficient, with a blood level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D of at least 30 ng/mL (a measure of vitamin D status), had a significant decreased risk for adverse clinical outcomes including becoming unconscious, hypoxia (body starved for oxygen) and death. In addition, they had lower blood levels of an inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein) and higher blood levels of lymphocytes (a type of immune cell to help fight infection). (2020-09-25)

Opening an autophagy window as the apoptosis door starts to close
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers have successfully attached the cancer cell-targeting antibody Trastuzumab to a previously reported supermolecule that induces autophagic cell death. The antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) selectively targeted HER2-overexpressing cancer calls and reduced cell viability at lower concentrations than free supermolecule drug. It is hoped that the ADC will provide a targeted autophagic death route for treating apoptosis resistant cancer cells in vivo, and ultimately provide an alternate approach in the clinic. (2020-09-24)

New 'atlas' of human heart cells first step toward precision treatments for heart disease
Scientists have for the first time documented all of the different cell types and genes expressed in the healthy human heart, in research published in the journal Nature. Cardiologists from the Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute at the University of Alberta joined teams from Cambridge, Boston and Berlin to use state-of-the-art analytical techniques to sequence the ribonucleic acids (RNA) in nine types of single cells from six regions of the heart. (2020-09-24)

UC study sheds light on cancer treatment, COVID-19
University of Cincinnati researchers have found that certain treatments for cancer may increase the chance of death if they contract COVID-19. (2020-09-19)

Removal of a gene could render lethal poxviruses harmless
The removal of one gene renders poxviruses - a lethal family of viral infections that are known to spread from animals to humans - harmless, a new study in the journal Science Advances reports. (2020-09-18)

Stop Livin to make lymphoma cells stop living
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown that the protein Livin, an inhibitor of apoptosis or programmed cell death, mediates resistance to immunotherapy in some lymphoma variants. Therapeutically targeting Livin with IAP inhibitors or BET inhibitors may provide a practical strategy for patients with Livin-positive and other refractory B-cell lymphomas. (2020-09-16)

Online tool informs recovery prospects for sepsis survivors
A doctor at Guy's and St Thomas', working with colleagues at the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC), has developed a tool to predict the risk of readmission to hospital or death in the first year after leaving hospital for adult survivors of sepsis. (2020-09-15)

When methane-eating microbes eat ammonia instead
As a side effect of their metabolism, microorganisms living on methane can also convert ammonia. In the process, they produce nitric oxide (NO), a central molecule in the global nitrogen cycle. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (DE), and Radboud University, Nijmegen (NL), now discovered the enzyme that produces NO, closing an important gap in our understanding of how methanotrophs deal with rising environmental ammonia concentrations. (2020-09-13)

New molecule to repair and restore brain and spinal cord function
A molecule created by researchers can restore lost connections in the spinal cord and brain of mice with neurological disorders including cerebellar ataxia, Alzheimer's disease and spinal cord injury. The research, involving scientists in the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (MRC LMB), in Cambridge, and collaborators from Japan and Germany, describes how the molecule repaired function in cells and in mouse models of diseases and injury. (2020-09-11)

Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer. (2020-09-10)

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