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Current Cell division News and Events, Cell division News Articles.
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It's all about the right balance
Collaborative work of research groups at the University of Würzburg and the TU Dresden has provided important new insights for cancer research. (2020-10-21)
Study discovers potential target for treating aggressive cancer cells
New research by a team at Brown University finds that special filaments called vimentin may be key to the spread of some aggressive, chemo-resistant cancer cells. (2020-10-21)
UC studies tobacco use, cancer connection
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have identified new clues into ways tobacco use impacts patients with kidney cancer. (2020-10-20)
Researchers identify the mechanism behind bone marrow failure in Fanconi anaemia
Researchers at the University of Helsinki and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified the mechanism behind bone marrow failure developing in children that suffer from Fanconi anaemia. (2020-10-14)
Blood tests could be developed to help predict pregnancy complications new study suggests
UCLA researchers say a blood test commonly used to detect fetal genetic abnormalities may help predict complications associated with pregnancy before symptoms develop. (2020-10-13)
Scientists are more specialized in larger and interdisciplinary teams
The roles of scientists change as research teams become more interdisciplinary and larger, finds new research from ESMT Berlin. (2020-10-07)
Sticking together
In unraveling how a single cell develops into a complex organism, one vexing question has remained for developmental biology: How do robust patterns form in the body? (2020-10-01)
New method allows precise gene control by light
A novel optical switch makes it possible to precisely control the lifespan of genetic ''copies''. (2020-09-25)
Divide and enlarge
Researchers discover a mechanism that causes cell nuclei to grow. (2020-09-22)
'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways. (2020-09-17)
Viral load predicts mortality rate in hospitalized patients with cancer and COVID-19
Higher viral loads are associated with a greater risk of death among cancer and non-cancer patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), researchers report September 15 in the journal Cancer Cell. (2020-09-16)
Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer. (2020-09-10)
New way to target some rapidly dividing cancer cells, leaving healthy cells unharmed
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Oxford say they have found a new way to kill some multiplying human breast cancer cells by selectively attacking the core of their cell division machinery. (2020-09-09)
Oxford University researchers discover 'genetic vulnerability' in breast cancer cells
The study, published in the scientific journal Nature, has uncovered a genetic vulnerability present in nearly 10% percent of all breast cancers tumours, and found a way to target this vulnerability and selectively kill cancer cells. (2020-09-09)
How do tumor cells divide in the crowd?
Scientists led by Dr. Elisabeth Fischer-Friedrich, group leader at the Excellence Cluster Physics of Life (PoL) and the Biotechnology Center TU Dresden (BIOTEC) studied how cancer cells are able to divide in a crowded tumor tissue and connected it to the hallmark of cancer progression and metastasis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). (2020-09-02)
Antagonistic genes modify rice plant growth
Rice stems lengthen when a newly identified gene activates during flooding. (2020-08-26)
Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes. (2020-08-25)
Single-cell RNA sequencing sheds new light on cancer cells' varied response to chemotherapy
Single-cell analysis, done in three colon cancer cell lines, is believed to be the first to profile transcriptome-level changes in response to DNA damage across individual cells. (2020-08-25)
A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A new method for visualizing in vivo protein dynamics in plant cells has been developed by Nagoya University scientists, offering an important step forward in plant cell fluorescent imaging. (2020-08-21)
Key molecule responsible for poor prognosis of breast cancer identified
Hokkaido University scientists have shown that Interleukin-34 is a prognostic marker and drug target for Triple Negative Breast Cancer. (2020-08-21)
Vaccine that harnesses antifungal immunity protects mice from staph infection
Immunization of mice with a new vaccine consisting of fungal particles loaded with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) proteins protects mice against S. aureus infection, according to a study published August 20 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David Underhill of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and colleague. (2020-08-20)
Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
A Belgian team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen (VIB-KU Leuven) finds that mitochondria regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. (2020-08-13)
CNIO and CNIC find clues to clarify why cohesine has a role in cancer and cardiac development
In 1998, Spanish researcher Ana Losada, currently at CNIO, identified cohesin in vertebrates, a protein essential for chromosome segregation in dividing cells. (2020-08-11)
New insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth
A novel connection between primordial organisms and complex life has been discovered, as new evidence sheds light on the evolutionary origins of the cell division process that is fundamental to complex life on Earth. (2020-08-06)
Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine
If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine. (2020-08-03)
Huntsman Cancer Institute illuminates potential new treatment in acute myeloid leukemia
In a study published in the journal Leukemia, lead author Ami Patel, MD, Huntsman Cancer Institute researcher and assistant professor in the Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies at the University of Utah, showed that factors produced by bone marrow support cells allowed leukemia cells to survive treatment with quizartinib, a type of TKI. (2020-07-31)
Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression
Using a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling, a team of researchers from the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science and the Fralin Life Sciences Institute are beginning to unravel the mechanisms that lie behind tetraploidy - a chromosomal abnormality that is often found in malignant tumors. (2020-07-24)
Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation. (2020-07-22)
Perspective: T cell responses to COVID-19 are a crucial target for research
While early research on the adaptive immune response to COVID-19 primarily looked at antibodies, more information is now emerging on how T cells react to the SARS-CoV-2 virus - addressing a crucial knowledge gap, say Daniel Altmann and Rosemary Boyton in a new Perspective. (2020-07-17)
Expansion stress enhances growth and migration of breast cancer cells
Expansion stress can have an alarming impact on breast cancer cells by creating conditions that could lead to dangerous acceleration of the disease, an interdisciplinary team of University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers has found. (2020-07-09)
New clues to lung-scarring disease may aid treatment
Scientists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix, Arizona, have discovered previously unreported genetic and cellular changes that occur in the lungs of people with pulmonary fibrosis (PF). (2020-07-08)
Limitations of super-resolution microscopy overcome
The smallest cell structures can now be imaged even better: The combination of two microscopy methods makes fluorescence imaging with molecular resolution possible for the first time. (2020-07-07)
The study of lysosomal function during cell division and chromosomal instability
By studying the role of lysosomes in mitosis, an IDIBELL and UB group discovers that alterations in the separation of chromosomes cause a detectable nucleus morphology once mitosis has finished. (2020-07-07)
Protein linked to cancer acts as a viscous glue in cell division
The protein PRC1, a telltale sign in many cancer types including prostate, ovarian, and breast cancer, act as a ''viscous glue'' during cell division, precisely controlling the speed at which two sets of DNA are separated as a single cell divides. (2020-07-07)
Oncotarget: Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning can drive resistance to EMT
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 published ''Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning during cell division can drive resistance to EMT'' by Jia et al. which reported that Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse process mesenchymal-epithelial transition are central to metastatic aggressiveness and therapy resistance in solid tumors. (2020-07-07)
Host cell fusion in bacteria infection alarms immune system, causing host cell destruction
NUS Medicine researchers have identified a new trigger for our immune system--abnormal fusion of host cells to form giant cells after infection by pathogens such as the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. (2020-07-07)
Multisample technique to analyze cell adhesion
An assay for imaging the physical interactions between multiple cell populations could help cancer research and treatment assessment. (2020-07-06)
How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. (2020-07-03)
CNIO team develop a technology to improve effectiveness of stem cells in regenerative medicine
Stem cells have been holding great promise for regenerative medicine for years. (2020-07-02)
High-end microscopy refined
New details are known about an important cell structure: For the first time, two Würzburg research groups have been able to map the synaptonemal complex three-dimensionally with a resolution of 20 to 30 nanometres. (2020-07-01)
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