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Current Cell membrane News and Events

Current Cell membrane News and Events, Cell membrane News Articles.
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Researchers find way to kill pathogen resistant to antibiotics
Nagoya University researchers and colleagues in Japan have demonstrated a new strategy in fighting antibiotics resistance: the use of artificial haem proteins as a Trojan horse to selectively deliver antimicrobials to target bacteria, enabling their specific and effective sterilization. (2019-09-20)
New mechanism for dysfunctional insulin release identified
In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have identified a previously unknown mechanism that regulates release of insulin, a hormone that lowers blood glucose levels, from the β-cells (beta cells) of the pancreas. (2019-09-19)
Cellular hitchhikers may hold a key to understanding ALS
RNA molecules get around nerve cells by hitching a ride on lysosomes. (2019-09-19)
SMART announces a revolutionary tech to study cell nanomechanics
Researchers at SMART, MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, in collaboration with MIT's Laser Biomedical Research Center (LBRC), have built a microscope that enables scientists to study the nuclear mechanics of cells while keeping their native properties intact -- something that wasn't possible with the existing invasive methods for nuclear mechanics. (2019-09-19)
Scientists construct energy production unit for a synthetic cell
Scientists at the University of Groningen have constructed synthetic vesicles in which ATP, the main energy carrier in living cells, is produced. (2019-09-18)
Scientists develop DNA microcapsules with built-in ion channels
A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices. (2019-09-18)
How microtubules branch in new directions, a first look in animals
Cell biologist Thomas Maresca and senior research fellow Vikash Verma at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say they have, for the first time, directly observed and recorded in animal cells a pathway called branching microtubule nucleation, a mechanism in cell division that had been imaged in cellular extracts and plant cells but not directly observed in animal cells. (2019-09-13)
Meet the molecule that helps stressed cells decide between life and death
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a molecule that plays a pivotal role in determining the fate of cells under stress, much like a Roman emperor deciding the fate of gladiators in the coliseum. (2019-09-11)
Study explores role of mediator protein complex in transcription and gene expression
A new study led by Ryerson University called 'The Med31 Conserved Component of the Divergent Mediator Complex in Tetrahymena thermophila Participates in Developmental Regulation' advances existing knowledge about transcription and gene expression. (2019-09-10)
Compound offers prospects for preventing acute kidney failure
Russian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Institute of Cell Biophysics, and elsewhere have shown an antioxidant compound known as peroxiredoxin to be effective in treating kidney injury in mice. (2019-09-09)
Why transporters really matter for cell factories
Scientists discover the secret behind some protein transporters' superiority. One transporter, MAE1, can export organic acids out of yeast spending close-to-zero energy. (2019-09-04)
Tiny thermometer measures how mitochondria heat up the cell by unleashing proton energy
Armed with a tiny new thermometer probe that can quickly measure temperature inside of a cell, University of Illinois researchers have illuminated a mysterious aspect of metabolism: heat generation. (2019-08-29)
Mechanism of epilepsy causing membrane protein is discovered
The team lead by Dr. Lim Hyun-Ho of Korea Brain Research Institute published its paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2019-08-29)
High-end microscopy reveals structure and function of crucial metabolic enzyme
The enzyme transhydrogenase plays a central role in regulating metabolic processes in animals and humans alike. (2019-08-28)
Cell biology -- Potential drop signals imminent danger
Misfolded proteins must be promptly eliminated as they can form toxic aggregates in cells. (2019-08-28)
These albino lizards are the world's first gene-edited reptiles
Meet the world's first gene-edited reptiles: albino lizards roughly the size of your index finger. (2019-08-27)
Fat pumps generate electrical power
A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ('flips') lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. (2019-08-27)
New biosensor provides insight into the stress behaviour of plants
Researchers have developed a method with which they can further investigate an important messenger substance in plants -- phosphatidic acid. (2019-08-27)
A new signaling pathway for mTor-dependent cell growth
A team led by the scientist Volker Haucke (Leibniz - Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie and Freie Universität Berlin) has now discovered how inactivation of a certain lipid kinase promotes mTor complex 1 activity, and may therefore constitute a new point of attack for the treatment of diabetes and cancer. (2019-08-27)
Biophysicists discovered how 'Australian' mutation leads to Alzheimer's disease
A team of scientists from MIPT and IBCh RAS studied one hereditary genetic mutation to discover general molecular mechanisms that may lead both to early onset of Alzheimer's disease and to the form of the disease caused by age-related changes in human body. (2019-08-23)
Researcher works to understand how gonorrhea develops resistance to antibiotics
As public health officials worry about the emergence of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea, an MUSC researcher is tracing how antibiotics bind to a gonococcal protein, information that can help lead to new antimicrobials. (2019-08-23)
Structure of protein nano turbine revealed
IST Austria scientists determine the first structure of a cell's rotary engine using state-of-art microscopy. (2019-08-22)
Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems
In new research published in the journal Science, a team of biologists, including Colorado State University Assistant Professor of Biology Marc Nishimura, have shed new light on a crucial aspect of the plant immune response. (2019-08-22)
Scientists build a synthetic system to improve wound treatment, drug delivery for soldiers
For the first time, scientists built a synthetic biologic system with compartments like real cells. (2019-08-22)
Preventing tumor metastasis
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute, together with colleagues from the pharmaceutical company F. (2019-08-22)
Scorpion toxin that targets 'wasabi receptor' may help solve mystery of chronic pain
Researchers at UC San Francisco and the University of Queensland have discovered a scorpion toxin that targets the 'wasabi receptor,' a chemical-sensing protein found in nerve cells that's responsible for the sinus-jolting sting of wasabi. (2019-08-22)
Materials scientists build a synthetic system with compartments like real cells
Polymer chemists and materials scientists have achieved some notable advances that mimic Nature, but one of the most common and practical features of cells has so far been out of reach -- intracellular compartmentalization. (2019-08-22)
Here's how early humans evaded immunodeficiency viruses
The cryoEM structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protein bound to primate proteins shows how a mutation in early humans allowed our ancestors to escape infection while monkeys and apes did not. (2019-08-22)
Scientists discover the basics of how pressure-sensing Piezo proteins work
A team of scientists from Weill Cornell Medicine and The Rockefeller University has illuminated the basic mechanism of Piezo proteins, which function as sensors in the body for mechanical stimuli such as touch, bladder fullness, and blood pressure. (2019-08-21)
Scientists probe how distinct liquid organelles in cells are created
One way biological compounds inside cells stay organized is through membrane-less organelles (MLOs) -- wall-less liquid droplets made from proteins and RNA that clump together and stay separate from the rest of the cellular stew. (2019-08-21)
New cyclization reactions for synthesizing macrocyclic drug leads
Scientists at EPFL have developed a new method to synthesize and screen thousands of macrocyclic compounds, a family of chemicals that are of great interest in the pharmaceutical industry. (2019-08-21)
Ammonia for fuel cells
Researchers at the University of Delaware have identified ammonia as a source for engineering fuel cells that can provide a cheap and powerful source for fueling cars, trucks and buses with a reduced carbon footprint. (2019-08-20)
A new path to cancer therapy: developing simultaneous multiplexed gene editing technology
Dr. Mihue Jang's group at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) announced that they have developed a new gene editing system that could be used for anticancer immunotherapy through the simultaneous suppression of proteins that interfere with the immune system expressed on the surface of lymphoma cells and activation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte, based on the results of joint research conducted with Prof. (2019-08-20)
Scientists find powerful potential weapon to overcome antibiotic resistance
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are a major cause of serious infections that often persist despite antibiotic treatment, but scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have now discovered a way to make these bacteria much more susceptible to some common antibiotics. (2019-08-14)
Deadly protein duo reveals new drug targets for viral diseases
New research from Cornell University details how two highly lethal viruses have greater pathogenic potential when their proteins are combined. (2019-08-13)
A leap forward in kidney disease research: Scientists develop breakthrough in vitro model
Researchers at CHLA develop first model of kidney filtration in the lab that accurately mimics human kidney physiology. (2019-08-13)
Gene for acid-sensitive ion channel identified
In the human body the salt content of cells and their surrounding is regulated by sophisticated transport systems. (2019-08-13)
Machine learning for damaging mutations prediction
Scientists from Russia and India have proposed a novel machine-learning-based method for predicting damaging mutations in the protein atomic structure. (2019-08-12)
Thinnest optical waveguide channels light within just three layers of atoms
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the thinnest optical device in the world -- a waveguide that is three layers of atoms thin. (2019-08-12)
Leishmania virulence strategy unveiled
A team from the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) has made a scientific breakthrough regarding the virulence strategy employed by the Leishmania parasite to infect cells of the immune system. (2019-08-12)
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