Nav: Home

Current Cell membrane News and Events

Current Cell membrane News and Events, Cell membrane News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Flashes bright when squeezed tight: How single-celled organisms light up the oceans
Research explains how a unicellular marine organism generates light as a response to mechanical stimulation, lighting up breaking waves at night. (2020-07-06)
Cell 'membrane on a chip' could speed up screening of drug candidates for COVID-19
Researchers have developed a human cell 'membrane on a chip' that allows continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with our cells, and may soon be used to test potential drug candidates for COVID-19. (2020-07-06)
To quench or not to quench: Understanding the role of a cyanobacterial photosystem protein
Photosynthesis is one of the most fundamental processes that support life on earth. (2020-07-06)
Multisample technique to analyze cell adhesion
An assay for imaging the physical interactions between multiple cell populations could help cancer research and treatment assessment. (2020-07-06)
Scientists synthesize novel artificial molecules that mimic a cell membrane protein
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) recently developed an artificial transmembrane ligand-gated channel that can mimic the biological structure and function of its natural counterpart. (2020-07-03)
New method reveals how the Parkinson's disease protein damages cell membranes
In sufferers of Parkinson's disease, clumps of α-synuclein (alpha-synuclein), sometimes known as the 'Parkinson's protein', are found in the brain. (2020-07-02)
New algorithm for personalized models of human cardiac electrophysiology
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Kazan Federal University, and George Washington University have proposed an algorithm for producing patient-specific mathematical models describing the electrical excitation of human heart cells. (2020-07-02)
"Targeting peptide" discovery offers hope as new, highly effective anti-inflammatory
A collaboration between the University of Toronto's Faculty of Dentistry and the National Jewish Health in Denver -- the top-ranked respiratory research hospital in the US -- has yielded a new drug discovery that could be useful to combat inflammation of all varieties and shows promise in fighting acute respiratory illnesses such as COVID-19. (2020-07-02)
New technique in which drugs make bacteria glow could help fight antibiotic resistance
A new technique could help reduce antibiotic prescribing by predicting which drugs could be effective in fighting bacteria within minutes. (2020-07-02)
Carbon-loving materials designed to reduce industrial emissions
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, are advancing gas membrane materials to expand practical technology options for reducing industrial carbon emissions. (2020-07-02)
University of Oregon scientists dissociate water apart efficiently with new catalysts
University of Oregon chemists have made substantial gains in enhancing the catalytic water dissociation reaction in electrochemical reactors, called bipolar membrane electrolyzers, to more efficiently rip apart water molecules into positively charged protons and negatively charged hydroxide ions. (2020-07-02)
New drug reduces stroke damage in mice
Mice that received an injection of a new experimental drug, TAT-DP-2, after a stroke had smaller areas of damage, and their long-term neurological function was better than that of untreated animals. (2020-07-01)
Scientists develop N-doped self-cleaning membranes that use visible light irradiation
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in the U.S. have recently employed atomic layer deposition (ALD) to fabricate visible light-activated membranes that efficiently utilize solar energy. (2020-06-30)
Brain receptor pulls open electrical gate like a puppet master
NMDA receptors convert chemical messages into electrical signals within a neuron. (2020-06-30)
Just add sugar: How a protein's small change leads to big trouble for cells
A study from investigators in the Sloan Kettering Institute reveals how a protein called GRP94, which is normally a 'good guy' in the cell, turns bad when it has a sugar molecule added to it. (2020-06-30)
Princeton's Nieng Yan tackles long-standing mysteries about membrane protein structure
To understand why a defect in a particular protein causes disease, we must know not only what that protein does but how. (2020-06-29)
How ApoE4 endangers the brain
Apolipoprotein E4 is considered the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. (2020-06-26)
New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have identified a novel protein complex that regulates Aurora B localization to ensure that chromosomes are correctly separated during cell division. (2020-06-26)
A new mechanism of toxicity in Alzheimer's disease revealed by the 3D structure of Aβ protein
Researchers led by Natàlia Carulla find that specific amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein ensembles have the capacity to disrupt the membrane of neurons, causing their death. (2020-06-26)
From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier
We all know that there are ''good'' and ''bad'' bacteria, but scientists have little insight into how bacteria become ''bad'' or ''pathogenic'' and cause disease. (2020-06-25)
When two are better than one: Why some gene duplicates are retained while others perish
Most duplicated gene copies either evolve new roles or lose their ability to code for proteins. (2020-06-25)
Tel Aviv University researchers destroy cancer cells with ultrasound treatment
An international research team has developed a noninvasive technology platform for gene delivery into breast cancer cells. (2020-06-24)
Illuminating cell surface receptors
Human cells sense and communicate via cell surface receptors on their surface. (2020-06-23)
Starved cancer cells became more sensitive to chemotherapy
By preventing sugar uptake, researchers succeeded in increasing the cancer cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic treatment. (2020-06-23)
A bacterial toxin turning cells into swiss cheese
Researchers from Kanazawa University developed a novel tool to study how the innate immune system fights bacterial toxins. (2020-06-23)
Sweet or sour natural gas
Natural gas that contains larger amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is termed sour gas. (2020-06-23)
Scientists produce first open source all-atom models of full-length COVID-19 'S' protein
The virus SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the known cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). (2020-06-22)
Cyclosporin study may lead to novel ways of approaching mitochondrial dysfunction
Fungi producing cyclosporins exist as two reproducing stages: asexual -- soil fungi from which cyclosporin was initially extracted, and sexual -- parasitic fungi close to a popularly known genus Cordyceps. (2020-06-18)
UAlberta clinician-scientists identify pink eye as possible primary symptom of COVID-19
A case of pink eye is now reason to be tested for COVID-19, according to University of Alberta researchers. (2020-06-18)
New research shows tiny, decoy 'sponges' attract coronavirus away from lung cells
New nanotechnology tested at BU's NEIDL stops SARS-CoV-2 from infecting cells and replicating. (2020-06-18)
Researchers study a novel type of extracellular vesicles
Researchers from Sechenov University and the University of Pittsburgh compared the properties of two groups of extracellular vesicles. (2020-06-18)
Nanosponges could intercept coronavirus infection
Nanoparticles cloaked in human lung cell membranes and human immune cell membranes can attract and neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, causing the virus to lose its ability to hijack host cells and reproduce. (2020-06-17)
Cellular nanosponges could soak up SARS-CoV-2
Scientists are working overtime to find an effective treatment for COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. (2020-06-17)
Scientists gain detailed images of how a protein that calms brain activity works
Elucidation of the 3D structure of the pharmacologically important GABAB receptor in four distinct conformations along its activation trajectory from an inactive state to an active state leads to a model of signal transduction by GABAB and its modulation by a positive allosteric modulator. (2020-06-17)
The rafts used by viruses
The study may suggest new strategies to limit virus attacks and prevent or combat diseases like Sars and Covid-19 based on biomedical and engineering principles. (2020-06-16)
Diabetic mice improve with retrievable millimeter-thick cell-laden hydrogel fiber
Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel fiber-shaped hydrogel transplant for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. (2020-06-15)
Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection -- which is not that big
In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells. (2020-06-15)
A raft that won't save you
New interdisciplinary research published in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids sheds light on how and why the cell membrane forms and grows lipid rafts triggered by ligand-receptor activity. (2020-06-15)
Viewing dopamine receptors in their native habitat
A new study led by UT Southwestern researchers reveals the structure of the active form of one type of dopamine receptor, known as D2, embedded in a phospholipid membrane. (2020-06-11)
Solving a Parkinson's disease puzzle through protein design
EPFL researchers, in collaboration with UTSW and UCSD scientists, have developed a computational protein design approach, and used it to obtain the first ever high-resolution structure of an activated dopamine receptor in its natural cell membrane environment. (2020-06-11)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Meditations on Loneliness
Original broadcast date: April 24, 2020. We're a social species now living in isolation. But loneliness was a problem well before this era of social distancing. This hour, TED speakers explore how we can live and make peace with loneliness. Guests on the show include author and illustrator Jonny Sun, psychologist Susan Pinker, architect Grace Kim, and writer Suleika Jaouad.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.