Nav: Home

Current Cell membrane News and Events

Current Cell membrane News and Events, Cell membrane News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Waking up sleeping bacteria to fight infections
Researchers in the group of Jan Michiels (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) identified a mechanism of how sleepy bacteria wake up. (2019-07-18)
Metal oxide-infused membranes could offer low-energy alternative for chemical separations
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are working on membranes that could separate chemicals without using energy-intensive distillation processes. (2019-07-18)
Molecular 'clutch' puts infection-fighting cells into gear
Two proteins that act as a 'clutch' in cells to put them in gear and drive our immune response have been identified for the first time. (2019-07-11)
UC San Diego cancer scientists identify new drug target for multiple tumor types
A dysfunctional enzyme involved in building cancer cell membranes helps fuel tumor growth; when it's disabled or depleted in mouse models, tumors shrank significantly. (2019-07-11)
Keeping a cell's powerhouse in shape
A German-Swiss team around Professor Oliver Daumke from the MDC has investigated how a protein of the dynamin family deforms the inner mitochondrial membrane. (2019-07-10)
Addicted to ran, ovarian cancer cells stop moving when deprived
Did you know that 90% of cancer patients die from distant metastasis? (2019-07-09)
Molecular energy machine as a movie star
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have used the Swiss Light Source SLS to record a molecular energy machine in action and thus to reveal how energy production at cell membranes works. (2019-07-08)
Caspase-1 initiates apoptosis, but not pyroptosis, in the absence of gasdermin D
Caspase-1 triggers programmed necrosis called pyroptosis by gasdermin-D (GSDMD) cleavage. (2019-07-05)
World first: Homing instinct applied to stem cells show cells 'home' to cardiac tissue
In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. (2019-07-03)
Imprinted spheres fight breast cancer
A particularly aggressive, metastasizing form of cancer, HER2-positive breast cancer, may be treated with nanoscopic particles ''imprinted'' with specific binding sites for the receptor molecule HER2. (2019-07-03)
New study unravels protection mechanism in bacteria
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have shed fresh light on the mechanism used by certain types of bacteria to protect themselves against attack. (2019-07-03)
Mechanism of scorpion toxin inhibition of K+ channel elucidated using high-speed AFM
Agitoxin-2 (AgTx2) from scorpion venom is a potent blocker of K+ channels. (2019-07-03)
Protein-linked sugars are crucial for the uptake of proteins linked to Parkinson's disease
New research from the University of Pennsylvania shows how glycoproteins, proteins with added sugar molecules, influence the uptake of protein aggregates that are associated with Parkinson's disease. (2019-07-03)
Synthesizing chemical-sensing cells from scratch
Scientists create artificial cells that can express distinct genes in response to specific chemical signals, opening the door to new ways of delivering drugs. (2019-07-02)
Parasitology -- On filaments and fountains
Microbiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that Toxoplasma gondii, the parasite that is responsible for toxoplasmosis, utilizes at least two modes of locomotion during its infection cycle. (2019-07-02)
UH researcher reports the way sickle cells form may be key to stopping them
University of Houston chemist Vassiliy Lubchenko is reporting a new finding in Nature Communications on how sickle cells are formed, which may lead not only to stopping their formation, but to new avenues for making uniformly-sized nanoparticles for industry. (2019-07-02)
Proteins trapped in glass could yield new medicinal advances
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a unique method for studying proteins which could open new doors for medicinal research. (2019-07-02)
Combing nanowire noodles
Brain-machine interfaces could one day help monitor and treat symptoms of neurological disorders, provide a blueprint to design artificial intelligence, or even enable brain-to-brain communication. (2019-07-01)
Coupled proteins
Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals. (2019-07-01)
Insects inspire greener, cheaper membranes for desalination
Insect-inspired design principles lead to first-ever water-repellent membranes made from water-wet materials. (2019-06-30)
An improved vaccine for bacterial meningitis and bloodstream infections
Researchers have now developed a new vaccine, a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine, for meningitis and bloodstream infections caused by 'meningococcal group B' bacteria. (2019-06-28)
Cryo-electron microscopy at reveals structures of protein that maintains cell membranes
Using cutting-edge electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University have determined the first structures of a lipid-flippase. (2019-06-27)
New insights into membrane trafficking regulated by ER fusion protein
Prof. HU Junjie from the Institute of Biophysics and his collaborators reported that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusogen atlastin (ATL) was involved in regulating cargo mobility and COPII formation in the ER. (2019-06-27)
Malaria hijacks your genes to invade your liver
Duke University researchers have identified more than 100 'hijacked' human genes that malaria parasites commandeer to take up residence inside their victim's liver during the silent early stages of infection, before symptoms appear. (2019-06-27)
Robot arm tastes with engineered bacteria
A robotic gripping arm that uses engineered bacteria to 'taste' for a specific chemical has been developed by engineers at UC Davis and Carnegie Mellon University. (2019-06-26)
Protein scissors for cellular transport
The movement of material in and out a cell, endocytosis, depends on proteins that cut the membrane to form vesicles encapsulating the transported materials. (2019-06-26)
Review emphasizes the power of simple physical models for complex protein machines
The function of protein machines in biological cells is so complex that even supercomputers cannot predict their cycles at atomic detail. (2019-06-25)
New membrane efficiently separates mirrored molecules
Prof. LIU Bo and colleagues at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) have developed a chiral separation membrane capable of capturing left-handed chiral molecules and releasing right-handed counterpart using two-dimensional layered materials. (2019-06-25)
An ion channel with a doorkeeper: The pH of calcium ions controls ion channel opening
Ion channels are pores in the membrane of cells or cell organelles that allow ions to be transported across the membrane. (2019-06-25)
Shedding light on rhodopsin dynamics in the retina
Photoreceptor cells in our eyes can adjust to both weak and strong light levels, but we still don't know exactly how they do it. (2019-06-24)
The key to unlock bacterial fusion
Researchers identify how a Chlamydia-produced protein helps bacterial compartments fuse together, thus increasing pathogenicity. (2019-06-21)
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. (2019-06-20)
'Robot blood' powers machines for lengthy tasks
Researchers at Cornell University have created a system of circulating liquid -- 'robot blood' -- within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks. (2019-06-20)
How bacteria kill host cells from the inside
A bacterial pathogen that typically multiplies outside of host cells can enter and induce the destruction of cells called macrophages, according to a study published June 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Anne-Béatrice Blanc-Potard of the Université de Montpellier in France, and colleagues. (2019-06-20)
Preventing drugs from being transported
A research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. (2019-06-17)
Exciting plant vacuoles
Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. (2019-06-14)
Researchers' discovery could lead to improved therapies for duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers found that the protein sarcospan can play a major role in combating heart failure in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (2019-06-14)
Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits
Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. (2019-06-13)
Carnegie Mellon researchers develop semi-liquid metal anode for next-generation batteries
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Mellon College of Science and College of Engineering have developed a semiliquid lithium metal-based anode that represents a new paradigm in battery design. (2019-06-12)
A microscopic topographic map of cellular function
The flow of traffic through our nation's highways and byways is meticulously mapped and studied, but less is known about how materials in cells travel. (2019-06-12)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...