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Current Cell membrane News and Events

Current Cell membrane News and Events, Cell membrane News Articles.
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Protection for pacemakers
A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers developed at ETH Zurich has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. (2019-11-21)
The ever-changing brain: Shining a light on synaptic plasticity
Researchers in the Membrane Cooperativity Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in Japan, in collaboration with researchers from universities across Japan, have found that AMPA receptors form and disintegrate continually, within a fraction of a second, rather than existing as stable entities. (2019-11-20)
A super-fast 'light switch' for future cars and computers
Switching light beams quickly is important in many technological applications. (2019-11-20)
Energy research -- Economizing on iridium
Iridium is an ideal catalyst for the electrolytic production of hydrogen from water -- but it is extremely expensive. (2019-11-20)
Researchers visualize bacteria motor in first step toward human-produced electrical energy
Humans, one day, may be able to produce their own electrical energy in the same way electric eels do, according to a research team based in Japan. (2019-11-20)
Scientists use catalysts to destroy cancerous cells from within
Researchers from the Universities of Granada and Zaragoza and the Edinburgh Cancer Research Center have developed a new tool in the fight against cancer. (2019-11-19)
25 years of learning to combat cervical cancer
A recent paper from the lab of Professor Sudhir Krishna at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, reviews the progress made in cervical cancer research over the past 25 years. (2019-11-19)
Cell death or cancer growth: A question of cohesion
Activation of CD95, a receptor found on all cancer cells, triggers programmed cell death -- or does the opposite, namely stimulates cancer cell growth. (2019-11-19)
Gene therapy: Development of new DNA transporters
Scientists at the Institute of Pharmacy at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed new delivery vehicles for future gene therapies. (2019-11-18)
Article proposes important mucin link between microbial infections and many cancers
In a review article, cancer biologists Pinku Mukherjee and Mukulika Bose argue that recent research suggests a mechanism that may implicate bacterial infections as important factors in epithelial cell cancers. (2019-11-18)
Dozens of potential new antibiotics discovered with free online app
A new web tool speeds the discovery of drugs to kill Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for the overwhelming majority of antibiotic-resistant infections and deaths. (2019-11-18)
Structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase
SciLifeLab researchers Alexander Mühleip and Alexey Amunts from Stockholm University solved the structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase with native lipids. (2019-11-18)
Scientists discover how the molecule-sorting station in our cells is formed and maintained
A recent study by a group of scientists from Japan and Austria has revealed that a different mechanism is responsible for the formation and maintenance of the cell organelle called endosome that sorts and distributes substances entering a cell. (2019-11-15)
Bacterial protein impairs important cellular processes
Researchers have discovered a new function of antibiotic resistant bacteria. (2019-11-15)
Turning waste heat into hydrogen fuel
Hydrogen as an energy carrier can help us move away from fossil fuels, but only if it is created efficiently. (2019-11-14)
Researchers develop a faster, stronger rabies vaccine
Every year, more than 59,000 people around the world die of rabies and there remains no cheap and easy vaccine regimen to prevent the disease in humans. (2019-11-14)
NIST-led team develops tiny low-energy device to rapidly reroute light in computer chips
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have developed an optical switch that routes light from one computer chip to another in just 20 billionths of a second -- faster than any other similar device. (2019-11-14)
Master regulator in mitochondria is critical for muscle function and repair
New study identifies how loss of mitochondrial protein MICU1 disrupts calcium balance and causes muscle atrophy and weakness. (2019-11-14)
Leukaemia cells can transform into non-cancerous cells through epigenetic changes
Researchers of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute discover that a leukaemic cell is capable of transforming into a non-cancerous cell through epigenetic changes. (2019-11-13)
Understanding transporter proteins at a single-molecule level
Research co-led by a St. Jude investigator and researchers from Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute reveals the mechanics of how some transporter proteins function with stunning specificity. (2019-11-13)
Mechanical signaling cascade central to fibrotic scar tissue development defined
In a new study published in Science Signaling, Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified a novel target for new therapies that may help to treat or prevent a host of fibrotic conditions, which contribute to nearly half of overall mortality in the United States. (2019-11-13)
No deliveries: How cells decide when to accept extracellular packages
Endocytosis, a fundamental process that cells use to take in macromolecules, functions a lot like an airlock on a spaceship -- but squishier, says Dr. (2019-11-13)
Photosynthesis seen in a new light by rapid X-ray pulses
In a new study, led by Petra Fromme and Nadia Zatsepin at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, the School of Molecular Sciences and the Department of Physics at ASU, researchers investigated the structure of Photosystem I (PSI) with ultrashort X-ray pulses at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (EuXFEL), located in Hamburg, Germany. (2019-11-08)
Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have designed an affordable 'flow battery' membrane that could accelerate renewable energy for the electrical grid. (2019-11-07)
KIER Identified Ion Transfer Principles of Salinity Gradient Power Generation Technology
Dr. Kim Hanki of Jeju Global Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research(KIER) developed a mathematical analysis model that can identify the ion transfer principle of salinity gradient power technology. (2019-11-07)
Why beta-blockers cause skin inflammation
Beta-blockers are often used to treat high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases. (2019-11-07)
Membrane intercalation enhances photodynamic bacteria inactivation
Recently, researchers from the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (TIPC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Utah reported their work on achieving enhanced membrane intercalation. (2019-11-06)
'Super-grafts' that could treat diabetes
To save patients with a severe form of type 1 diabetes, pancreatic cell transplantation is the last resort. (2019-11-06)
Discovered a new process of antitumor response of NK cells in myeloma
The stem cell transplant and cell immunotherapy group of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute reveals how NK cells activate a set of actions that promote their antitumor capacity in the presence of myeloma cells. (2019-11-05)
'Big data' for life sciences
Scientists have produced a co-regulation map of the human proteome, which was able to capture relationships between proteins that do not physically interact or co-localize. (2019-11-05)
Measuring cell-cell forces using snapshots from time-lapse videos of cells
A new computational method can measure the forces cells exert on each other by analyzing time-lapse videos of cell colonies. (2019-11-05)
Why myelinated mammalian nerves are fast and allow high frequency
Researchers have achieved patch-clamp studies of an elusive part of mammalian myelinated nerves called the Nodes of Ranvier. (2019-11-05)
Deep sea vents had ideal conditions for origin of life
By creating protocells in hot, alkaline seawater, a UCL-led research team has added to evidence that the origin of life could have been in deep-sea hydrothermal vents rather than shallow pools, in a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2019-11-04)
Discovery of 'cellular bike couriers' clue to disease spreading
A previously unknown component of our cells that delivers proteins like a bike courier in heavy traffic could shed light on the mechanisms that allow cells to spread in diseases such as cancer. (2019-10-31)
Molecular gatekeepers that regulate calcium ions key to muscle function
Controlled entry of calcium ions into the mitochondria, the cell's energy powerhouses, makes the difference between whether muscles grow strong or easily tire and perish from injury, according to research published in Cell Reports. (2019-10-31)
How Chlamydia gain access to human cells
Infection biologists at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and the University of Freiburg have found out how the LIPP protein discovered in Düsseldorf helps Chlamydia to infect human cells. (2019-10-30)
Scientists discover the implication of a new protein involved in liver cancer
Scientists discover the implication of a new protein involved in liver cancer. (2019-10-29)
Turning a dangerous toxin into a biosensor
Some bacteria release a toxin that forms pores on other cells. (2019-10-29)
First structure of human cotransporter protein family member solved
In work that could someday improve treatments for epilepsy, UT Southwestern scientists have published the first three-dimensional structure of a member of a large family of human proteins that carry charged particles -- ions -- across the cell membrane. (2019-10-29)
Dynamic images show rhomboid protease in action
Rhomboid proteases are clinically relevant membrane proteins that play a key role in various diseases. (2019-10-25)
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