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Current Cell types News and Events

Current Cell types News and Events, Cell types News Articles.
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Discovery of how organs form helps researchers to develop future diabetes treatments
In a new study, researchers at the University of Copenhagen show that the development of a certain type of immature stem cells -- also known as progenitor cells -- depends on the quantity of a special protein and interaction with other cells in the body. (2019-03-13)
Biologists have studied enzymes that help wheat to fight fungi
Scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with their Russian colleagues studied reaction of wheat plants to damage caused by pathogenic fungi. (2019-03-08)
New target for chronic pain relief confirmed by scientists
A research group at Hiroshima University observed a potential new target for chronic pain treatment. (2019-03-07)
Increasingly complex mini-brains
Scientists improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells. (2019-03-07)
A new way to map cell regulatory networks
A new mathematical method developed by researchers at Cincinnati Children's and New York University may soon make it much easier to conduct more of the complex data analysis needed to drive advances in the exploding field of personalized medicine. (2019-03-05)
UMaine-led team discovers protein, lipid connection that could aid new influenza therapies
For the first time, a connection is shown between influenza virus surface protein HA and host cell lipid PIP2. (2019-03-05)
Turning them on, turning them off -- how to control stem cells
Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells. (2019-02-28)
Nicotine may harm human embryos at the single-cell level
Nicotine induces widespread adverse effects on human embryonic development at the level of individual cells, researchers report Feb. (2019-02-28)
Atlas of acute myeloid leukemia cell types may lead to improved, targeted therapies
A research team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has assembled a detailed atlas of bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia, an aggressive blood cancer that usually leads to death within five years of diagnosis. (2019-02-28)
An atlas of an aggressive leukemia
A team of researchers led by Bradley Bernstein at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has used single-cell technologies and machine learning to create a detailed 'atlas of cell states' for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that could help improve treatment of the aggressive cancer. (2019-02-28)
'Upcycling' plastic bottles could give them a more useful second life
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have developed a recycling process that transforms single-use beverage bottles, clothing, and carpet made from the common polyester material polyethylene terephthalate (PET) into more valuable products with a longer lifespan. (2019-02-27)
Environmental variables may influence B cell development and allergies in children
An analysis of a birth cohort containing 51 newborns followed from infancy through the first three years of life has linked mutations in antibodies to a heightened risk of allergic diseases such as eczema. (2019-02-27)
New clue for cancer treatment could be hiding in microscopic molecular machine
Researchers have discovered a critical missing step in the production of proteasomes -- tiny structures in a cell that dispose of protein waste -- and found that carefully targeted manipulation of this step could prove an effective recourse for the treatment of cancer. (2019-02-26)
Study sheds more light on genes' 'on/off' switches
Regulation of genes by noncoding DNA might help explain the complex interplay between our environment and genetic expression. (2019-02-26)
Brain cells involved in insomnia identified
An international team of researchers has identified, for the first time, the cell types, areas and biological processes in the brain that mediate the genetic risk of insomnia. (2019-02-25)
New microfluidics device can detect cancer cells in blood
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Queensland University of Technology of Australia, have developed a device that can isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples. (2019-02-25)
Outfitting T cell receptors to combat a widespread and sometimes deadly virus
Researchers have engineered 'antibody-like' T cell receptors that can specifically stick to cells infected with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, a virus that causes lifelong infection in more than half of all adults by age 40. (2019-02-22)
Figuring out the fovea
Using high-throughput genetic sequencing methods, scientists have created the first cellular atlas of the primate retina, an important foundation for researchers to build on as they seek to understand how vision works in primates, including humans, and how vision can be disrupted by disease. (2019-02-21)
Good news: Habitats worthy of protection in Germany are protected
The world's largest coordinated network of protected areas is not located at the South Pole or in Australia, Africa, Asia or on the American continents -- but in Europe. (2019-02-21)
Signals on the scales
How are the images cast on the retina reassembled in the brain? (2019-02-21)
Johns Hopkins researchers define cells used in bone repair
Research led by Johns Hopkins investigators has uncovered the roles of two types of cells found in the vessel walls of fat tissue and described how these cells may help speed bone repair. (2019-02-20)
Russian researchers made gold nano-stars for intracellular delivery
Researchers from Russian Academy of Sciences developed a new method for star-shaped nanoparticles synthesis based on laser irradiation. (2019-02-20)
Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development
A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. (2019-02-20)
Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell
A new study by researchers at the Allen Discovery Center at UW Medicine has traced animportant period of organ formation, cell by cell, in the developing mouse. (2019-02-20)
Bat influenza viruses could infect humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. (2019-02-20)
Human cells can change job to fight diabetes
For the first time, researchers have shown that ordinary human cells can change their original function. (2019-02-14)
Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells
Researchers at ETH Zurich recently demonstrated that platinum nanoparticles can be used to kill liver cancer cells with greater selectivity than existing cancer drugs. (2019-02-14)
Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs
Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. (2019-02-14)
Improved RNA data visualization method gets to the bigger picture faster
Like going from a pinhole camera to a Polaroid, a significant mathematical update to the formula for a popular bioinformatics data visualization method will allow researchers to develop snapshots of single-cell gene expression not only several times faster but also at much higher-resolution. (2019-02-14)
Human cells can also change jobs
Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation. (2019-02-13)
Why too much DNA repair can injure tissue
MIT researchers have discovered how overactive DNA repair systems can lead to retinal damage and blindness in mice. (2019-02-12)
RUDN biochemists found a way to stop the immortality of cancer cells with oligonucleotides
RUDN biochemists found a way to reduce the activity of telomerase (the enzyme of cell immortality) 10 times. (2019-02-11)
Gene involved in colorectal cancer also causes breast cancer
Rare mutations in the NTHL1 gene, previously associated with colorectal cancer, also cause breast cancer and other types of cancer. (2019-02-11)
Duke-NUS study: Interaction between two immune cell types could be key to better dengue vaccines
A sentinel immune cell in the skin surprises researchers by forming a physical connection with a virus-killing T cell. (2019-02-07)
Biologists answer fundamental question about cell size
MIT biologists have discovered why cell sizes are so tightly regulated. (2019-02-07)
How men continually produce sperm -- and How that discovery could help treat infertility
Using a leading-edge technique, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers defined the cell types in both newborn and adult human testes and identified biomarkers for spermatogonial stem cells, opening a path for new strategies to treat male infertility. (2019-02-05)
Cannabinoid compounds may inhibit growth of colon cancer cells
Medical marijuana has gained attention in recent years for its potential to relieve pain and short-term anxiety and depression. (2019-02-05)
Revealing the path of a metallodrug in a breast cancer cell
Some types of cancer cannot be treated with classical chemotherapy. (2019-02-04)
Cell lines deserve unique considerations when creating research protections, authors say
New rules recently went into effect, seeking to protect patients who donate tissue samples for research in the age of genetic sequencing. (2019-01-31)
Engineering a cancer-fighting virus
An engineered virus kills cancer cells more effectively than another virus currently used in treatments, according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2019-01-29)
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