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Current Chemical physics News and Events

Current Chemical physics News and Events, Chemical physics News Articles.
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Artificial intelligence algorithm can learn the laws of quantum mechanics
Artificial intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. (2019-11-19)
Blowing bubbles: PPPL scientist confirms way to launch current in fusion plasmas
PPPL physicist Fatima Ebrahimi has used high-resolution computer simulations to investigate the practicality of the CHI start-up technique. (2019-11-18)
Atomically dispersed Ni is coke-resistant for dry reforming of methane
Scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have now developed completely coke-resistant Ni-based single-atom catalyst (SAC). (2019-11-15)
Drexel researchers create and stabilize pure polymeric nitrogen using plasma
Researchers at Drexel University's C&J Nyheim Plasma Institute have reported the production of the first pure polymeric nitrogen compound at near-ambient conditions. (2019-11-14)
Simulation reveals how bacterial organelle converts sunlight to chemical energy
Scientists have simulated every atom of a light-harvesting structure in a photosynthetic bacterium that generates energy for the organism. (2019-11-14)
Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts
Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in mapping catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles. (2019-11-13)
Deep learning expands study of nuclear waste remediation
A research collaboration between Berkeley Lab, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Brown University, and NVIDIA has achieved exaflop performance with a deep learning application used to model subsurface flow in the study of nuclear waste remediation. (2019-11-12)
Century-old food testing method updated to include complex fluid dynamics
The texture of food is an important part of enjoying foods. (2019-11-08)
Trapping versus dropping atoms expands 'interrogation' to 20 seconds
Trapped atoms, suspended aloft on a lattice of laser light for as long as 20 seconds, allow for highly sensitive measurements of gravity, according to a new study, which describes a new approach to atom interferometers. (2019-11-07)
Electrochemistry amps up in pharma
Sparked by several high-profile reports, electrochemistry -- using electricity to perform chemical reactions like oxidation and reduction -- is gaining popularity in the pharmaceutical field. (2019-11-06)
Scientists can replace metal collimators with plastic analogs
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University conducted studies of plastic collimators, which can replace their metal analogs used in radiation therapy. (2019-11-06)
Flatland light
Harvard researchers have developed rewritable optical components for surface light waves. (2019-11-06)
Researchers model avalanches in two dimensions
There's a structural avalanche waiting inside that box of Rice Krispies on the supermarket shelf. (2019-11-06)
Black holes sometimes behave like conventional quantum systems
A group of Skoltech researchers led by Professor Anatoly Dymarsky have studied the emergence of generalized thermal ensembles in quantum systems with additional symmetries. (2019-11-05)
How oxygen destroys the core of important enzymes
Certain enzymes, such as hydrogen-producing hydrogenases, are unstable in the presence of oxygen. (2019-11-04)
Scientists develop strategy to stabilize single atoms with ionic liquid as electronic stabilizer
Scientists at the National University of Singapore, Kyoto University, Hokkaido University and the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a strategy to stabilize isolated metal atoms on various oxide supports by using ionic liquids (ILs) as an electronic stabilizer. (2019-11-04)
New study sheds light on conditions that trigger supernovae explosions
For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate the process of detonation formation using both experiments and numerical simulations carried out on supercomputers. (2019-11-01)
Using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions
The University of Pittsburgh's James McKone's research on using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions is featured in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A's Emerging Investigators special issue. (2019-10-29)
Study shows ability to detect light from UV to the IR optical regimes using spin currents
The spin Seebeck effect (SSE) can be used to detect light across a broad optical range -- ultraviolet through visible to near-infrared. (2019-10-29)
Mathematics reveals new insights into Marangoni flows
In a new study published in EPJ E, Thomas Bickel at the University of Bordeaux has discovered new mathematical laws governing the properties of Marangoni flows. (2019-10-28)
An amazingly simple recipe for nanometer-sized corundum
Almost everyone uses nanometer-sized alumina these days -- this mineral, among others, constitutes the skeleton of modern catalytic converters in cars. (2019-10-28)
Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium
ETH researchers have recently been able to monitor the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium alloys at the nanoscale over a time scale of a few seconds to many hours. (2019-10-23)
UCF researchers work to create infrared detectors for viper-like night vision
Much like some snakes use infrared to 'see' at night, University of Central Florida researchers are working to create similar viper vision to improve the sensitivity of night-vision cameras. (2019-10-23)
Fragmented magnetism
Spin-polarizing scanning tunneling microscopy allowed researchers to detect an elusive atomic-scale magnetic signal in a Mott insulator, reports a team of scientists from Boston College, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and University of California, Santa Barbara. (2019-10-22)
3D printing, bioinks create implantable blood vessels
A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks. (2019-10-22)
Male deer stain their bellies according to their competitive context
The Fish and Game Resources Research Unit at the University of Cordoba connects different chemicals on deer's ''dark bellies'' to the level of competition among the population (2019-10-21)
A cavity leads to a strong interaction between light and matter
Researchers have succeeded in creating an efficient quantum-mechanical light-matter interface using a microscopic cavity. (2019-10-21)
Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide
Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds. (2019-10-21)
Scientists discover method to create and trap trions at room temperature
A University of Maryland-led team chemically engineered carbon nanotubes to synthesize and trap trions at room temperature. (2019-10-16)
Quantum paradox experiment may lead to more accurate clocks and sensors
More accurate clocks and sensors may result from a recently proposed experiment, linking an Einstein-devised paradox to quantum mechanics. (2019-10-15)
Creating miracles with polymeric fibers
Mohan Edirisinghe leads a team at University College London studying the fabrication of polymeric nanofibers and microfibers -- very thin fibers made up of polymers. (2019-10-15)
New understanding of the evolution of cosmic electromagnetic fields
Electromagnetism was discovered 200 years ago, but the origin of the very large electromagnetic fields in the universe is still a mystery. (2019-10-15)
Quantum physics: Ménage à trois photon-style
When two photons become entangled, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second. (2019-10-15)
UW study advances alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes along common axis
The researchers used machine-vision automation and parallelization to simultaneously produce globally aligned, single-wall carbon nanotubes using pressure-driven filtration. (2019-10-15)
Stressing metallic material controls superconductivity
No strain, no gain -- that's the credo for Cornell researchers who have helped find a way to control superconductivity in a metallic material by stressing and deforming it. (2019-10-14)
New science on cracking leads to self-healing materials
Cracks in the desert floor appear random to the untrained eye, even beautifully so, but the mathematics governing patterns of dried clay turn out to be predictable -- and useful in designing advanced materials. (2019-10-10)
FSU physics researchers break new ground, explore unknown energy regions
Florida State University physicists are using photon-proton collisions to capture particles in an unexplored energy region, yielding new insights into the matter that binds parts of the nucleus together. (2019-10-10)
mpacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut
An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers at the University of Oregon. (2019-10-10)
Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?
New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together. (2019-10-10)
Smaller than a coin
ETH researchers have developed a compact infrared spectrometer. It's small enough to fit on a computer chip but can still open up interesting possibilities -- in space and in everyday life. (2019-10-08)
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