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Current Chemical reactions News and Events

Current Chemical reactions News and Events, Chemical reactions News Articles.
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Study shows a much cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device
SLAC and Stanford researchers have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen gas for hours on end in the harsh environment of a commercial electrolyzer -- a step toward clean, large-scale hydrogen production for fuel, fertilizer and industry. (2019-10-14)
Physics: An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere
Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have explored the initial consequences of the interaction of light with molecules on the surface of nanoscopic aerosols. (2019-10-11)
Stable radicals can solve unconventional problems in modern science and technology
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University study reaction properties of verdazyl radicals, which can expand scientific knowledge into the field of organic chemistry and help to obtain new materials. (2019-10-10)
New production technique for high-performance polymer could make for better body armor
Using a new composite nanoparticle catalyst, Brown University researchers have shown they can make degradation-resistant PBO, a polymer used to make body armor and other high-performance fabrics. (2019-10-09)
Chemical evolution -- One-pot wonder
Before life, there was RNA: Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich show how the four different letters of this genetic alphabet could be created from simple precursor molecules on early Earth -- under the same environmental conditions. (2019-10-09)
A close up on the real world --- atomic migration under ambient conditions
Osaka University researchers have reported an environmental transmission electron microscopy technique that has allowed in situ visualization of the atomic changes of a metal surface in an electric field under ambient conditions. (2019-10-08)
Severe allergic reactions identified with peripherally inserted central catheters
Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) that use a magnetized tip to guide insertion were associated with serious allergic reactions in patients, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-10-08)
Forward or backward? New pathways for protons in water or methanol
A collaborative ultrafast spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations study shows that proton vacancies in the form of hydroxide/methoxide ions are as relevant for proton transfer between acids and bases as hydrated excess protons, thus pointing for a clear demand for refinement of the microscopic picture for aqueous proton transport - in solution as well as in hydrogen fuel cells or transmembrane proteins - away from currently often assumed dominant role of hydrated excess protons. (2019-10-08)
Scientists identify molecule that could have helped cells thrive on early Earth
A new study, led by Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, of Scripps Research, and Sheref Mansy, PhD, of the University of Trento, offers an explanation for how ''protocells'' could have emerged on early Earth, eventually leading to the cells we know today. (2019-10-08)
A new mathematical approach to understanding zeolites
A system developed at MIT helps to identify zeolites that can readily transform into other zeolite forms, which are widely used as catalysts in industrial processes. (2019-10-07)
Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat
Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have synthesized magnetically-doped quantum dots that capture the kinetic energy of electrons created by ultraviolet light before it's wasted as heat. (2019-10-07)
Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?
Chemists at Saint Louis University, in collaboration with scientists at the College of Charleston and the NSF/NASA Center for Chemical Evolution, found that deliquescent minerals, which dissolve in water they absorb from humid air, can assist the construction of proteins from simpler building blocks during cycles timed to mimic day and night on the early Earth. (2019-10-04)
Eco-friendly electrochemical catalysts using solar cells to harvest energy from the sun
A research team from Tokyo Tech and Kanazawa University develops an eco-friendly device that uses solar energy to catalyze an electrochemical oxidation reaction with high efficiency. (2019-10-03)
A new, unified pathway for prebiotic RNA synthesis
Adding to support for the RNA world hypothesis, Sidney Becker and colleagues have presented what's not been shown before -- a single chemical pathway that could generate both the purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, the key building blocks of RNA. (2019-10-03)
Heart, kidney disease risk factors for adverse effects from gout medication
Heart disease is an independent risk factor for severe adverse skin reactions in patients taking allopurinol, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-09-30)
Strained, symmetric, and new
Many natural compounds used in medicine have complex molecular architectures that are difficult to recreate in the lab. (2019-09-30)
Life's building blocks may have formed in interstellar clouds
An experiment shows that one of the basic units of life -- nucleobases -- could have originated within giant gas clouds interspersed between the stars. (2019-09-27)
Converting CO2 to valuable resources with the help of nanoparticles
An international research team has used nanoparticles to convert carbon dioxide into valuable raw materials. (2019-09-27)
Aerosols from coniferous forests no longer cool the climate as much
Emissions of greenhouse gases have a warming effect on the climate, whereas small airborne particles in the atmosphere, aerosols, act as a cooling mechanism. (2019-09-25)
Resistance to immune checkpoint blocker drug linked to metabolic imbalance
A metabolic imbalance in some cancer patients following treatment with a checkpoint inhibitor drug, nivolumab, is associated with resistance to the immunotherapy agent and shorter survival, report scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (2019-09-25)
Converting absorbed photons into twice as many excitons: Successful high-efficiency energy conversion with organic monolayer on gold nanocluster surface
A group of researchers from Kobe and Keio universities found that when light was exposed to the surface of a tetracene alkanethiol-modified gold nanocluster, which they developed themselves, twice as many excitons could be converted compared to the number of photons absorbed by the tetracene molecules. (2019-09-24)
Building on UD, Nobel legacy
New approach to producing indolent scaffolds could streamline development and production of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, which comprise the majority of medicines in use today. (2019-09-23)
Fullerene compounds knock out virus infections
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology and the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS in collaboration with researchers from four other Russian and foreign research centers have discovered a new reaction that helps obtain water-soluble fullerene derivatives which effectively combat flu viruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV). (2019-09-23)
Illinois researchers develop new framework for nanoantenna light absorption
Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the 'diffraction limit.' However, University of Illinois researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources. (2019-09-23)
Researchers resolve how fungi produce compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications
Research led by the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has solved a nearly 50-year-old mystery of how nature produces a large class of bioactive chemical compounds. (2019-09-23)
Corrosion resistance of steel bars in concrete when mixed with aerobic microorganisms
Dissolved oxygen in pore solution is often a controlling factor determining the rate of the corrosion process of steel bars in concrete. (2019-09-20)
Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities
Feature describes improved model for forecasting the crucial balance of pressure at the edge of a fusion plasma. (2019-09-20)
Let there be light: Synthesizing organic compounds
The appeal of developing improved drugs to promote helpful reactions or prevent harmful ones has driven organic chemists to better understand how to synthetically create these molecules and reactions in the laboratory. (2019-09-19)
Extinct human species gave modern humans an immunity boost
Garvan researchers have discovered a gene variant that sheds new light on how human immunity was fine-tuned through history. (2019-09-18)
AI-guided robotics enable automation of complex synthetic biological molecules
This article describes a platform that combines artificial intelligence-driven synthesis planning, flow chemistry and a robotically controlled experimental platform to minimize the need for human intervention in the synthesis of small organic molecules. (2019-09-17)
Elusive compounds of greenhouse gas isolated by Warwick chemists
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent atmospheric pollutant. Although naturally occurring, anthropogenic N2O emissions from intensive agricultural fertilisation, industrial processes, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are a major cause for concern. (2019-09-17)
Researchers mix RNA and DNA to study how life's process began billions of years ago
RNA World is a fascinating theory, says Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, an associate professor of chemistry at Scripps Research, but it may not hold true. (2019-09-16)
Blink and you'll miss it
Many natural and synthetic chemical systems react and change their properties in the presence of certain kinds of light. (2019-09-13)
Sticks and stones may break your bones, but this reaction edits skeletons
Marcos G. Suero and his research group at the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) present a new reaction that allows for the edition of organic molecule's skeletons, opening up new avenues of research. (2019-09-13)
Humans more unique than expected when it comes to digesting fatty meals
People have very individualized inflammatory responses to eating a high-fat meal. (2019-09-12)
Science snapshots: Messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis
Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis (2019-09-12)
Gem-like nanoparticles of precious metals shine as catalysts
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new method for making highly desirable catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells, among other applications. (2019-09-12)
From years to days: Artificial Intelligence speeds up photodynamics simulations
The prediction of molecular reactions triggered by light is to date extremely time-consuming and therefore costly. (2019-09-11)
Colorful microreactors utilize sunlight
The sun is the most sustainable energy source available on our planet and could be used to power photochemical reactions. (2019-09-10)
Precious metal flecks could be catalyst for better cancer therapies
Tiny extracts of a precious metal used widely in industry could play a vital role in new cancer therapies. (2019-09-09)
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