Current Children News and Events

Current Children News and Events, Children News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is 'taught a lesson'
Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers -- and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov. 23, 2020 in the journal Nature Human Behaviour shows. (2020-11-23)

Emergency imaging trends in pediatric vs. adult patients for abdominal pain
According to AJR, although pediatric CT use has decreased for the evaluation of abdominal pain (perhaps due to implementing an ultrasound-first strategy for suspected appendicitis), CT use has continued to increase among adults with abdominal pain in U.S. emergency department (ED) visits. Although trends in CT use have previously been reported for children and adults, this study is the first to contrast the two cohorts in the ED setting in a nationally representative sample. (2020-11-20)

Risk of mental disorders later in life potentially higher in kids of low-income families
The results gained in a study involving approximately one million Danish children increase the understanding of how socio-economic differences in childhood affect the development of mental disorders in the Nordic countries. (2020-11-20)

Diagnosing the cause of exercise-induced respiratory symptoms
Exercise?induced respiratory symptoms are common in childhood, and it can be difficult to diagnose their cause. A study published in Pediatric Pulmonology found that the diagnoses proposed by primary care physicians are often not the same as the final diagnoses after specialist referrals. (2020-11-18)

Children misdiagnosed with "impairment of language acquisition"
Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German. Those who our experiencing difficulty in learning the second language are often diagnosed as having a suspected ''impairment of language acquisition''. In fact, this often merely reflects the fact that they have not yet fully acquired the second language. (2020-11-16)

Nearly one in five parents of food-allergic children are bullied
A new study being presented at this year's virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting shows that nearly one in five parents of food-allergic kids are the target of bullying by a multitude of sources. (2020-11-13)

Single institution study finds high rates of cardiac complications in MIS-C
During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers at Children's National Hospital discovered that as many as one half of children diagnosed with multisystem inflammatory disease in children (MIS-C) at the hospital developed cardiac complications including coronary artery abnormalities, even when diagnosed and treated promptly. (2020-11-13)

Prescriptions of antipsychotic medications in young children is declining
The use of antipsychotics in young children is declining but doctors continue to prescribe these medications off-label for conditions not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and without the recommended psychiatric consultation, a Rutgers study found. (2020-11-09)

A brief pilot intervention enhances preschoolers' self-regulation and food liking
Mindfulness training and engaging in classroom-based games can influence self-regulation and food liking when introduced during the preschool years according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier. (2020-11-06)

Conflicts in kindergarten can reduce children's interest in reading and math
Teacher-perceived conflict predicts lower interest and pre-academic skills in math and literacy among kindergarteners, a new study from Finland shows. (2020-11-05)

Innovative strategies sustain children's preventative care during pandemic
Nemours Children's Health System increased patient immunizations by 4.6% from January - September 2020, compared with the same period in 2019, through an innovative hybrid approach to care using both in-person and telemedicine, according to new data presented today at the Children's Hospital Association's 2020 Annual Leadership Conference. (2020-11-02)

Paediatrics: Antiepileptic drug exposure in pregnancy and neurodevelopmental disorder risk
Children born to mothers who took the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate during pregnancy may have a four to five-fold increased risk of developing neurodevelopmental disorders in early childhood, according to a study in Scientific Reports. Fifty of the 991 French children (5%) who were exposed to sodium valproate were diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders in their first five years, compared to 15,270 of 1,710,441 children (0.89%) not exposed to any antiepileptic drugs. (2020-10-22)

Do asymptomatic kids with COVID-19 carry less virus?
New questions are at the forefront as a study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology from nine children's hospitals finds that most asymptomatic children who tested positive for COVID-19 had relatively low levels of the virus compared to symptomatic children. The authors caution that the reason for this finding is unclear and more questions need to be answered. (2020-10-22)

Researchers analyze studies of interventions to prevent violence against children
Numerous studies have examined interventions aimed at preventing violence against children. A recent analysis reveals various gaps not adequately addressed by these studies. (2020-10-21)

Reduced hormone supply in pregnant mothers linked to ADHD in their children
Low levels of key, body-regulating chemicals in mothers during the first three months of pregnancy may interfere with the baby's brain development, a large American study shows. (2020-10-21)

Children with chronic kidney disease have outsized health burden
Chronically ill children with kidney disease may spend more time in the hospital, incur larger health care costs and have a higher risk of death compared to pediatric patients hospitalized for other chronic conditions, a new study suggests. (2020-10-20)

New evidence to guide the practice of blood transfusions in children with severe malari
Blood transfusions increase the survival of children admitted to the hospital with complications by severe malaria, and could be beneficial even at higher haemoglobin levels than those currently recommended. These are the main findings of a study led by ISGlobal, a centre supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation, and published in The Lancet Haematology. (2020-10-19)

Urban daycare yards outfitted with natural forest floor boosted children's immune systems
Children who played in formerly gravel-covered urban daycare center yards renovated with natural forest floor, sod, and vegetation developed more diverse microbiomes and signs of a better-regulated immune system within one month, according to a new study with 75 children between 3 and 5 years old. The findings suggest it may be possible to improve immune. (2020-10-14)

Novel software assesses phonologial awareness
Understanding sounds in language is a critical building block for child literacy, yet this skill is often overlooked. Researchers from Michigan State University have developed a new software tool to assess children's phonological awareness -- or, how they process the sound structure of words. (2020-10-14)

Children with kidney disease have longer hospital stays
Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require hospitalization; however, outcomes of this high risk population are unknown. The authors found that children with CKD had longer hospital stays, incurred higher health care expenses, and were at higher risk of death than children hospitalized for other chronic illnesses. This study suggests that these associations are related to the higher degree of medical complexity among children hospitalized with CKD. (2020-10-12)

Effects of poverty on childhood development seen in children as young as 5
UCLA researchers have found that health inequities can be measured in children as young as 5 years old. The research, published in Health Affairs, contributes to a growing body of literature finding that children of color who are also poor face greater health inequities than their white counterparts. (2020-10-08)

Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers
Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations - which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to anger - may be because they are 'rehearsing' strategies to cope with hot-headed friends. (2020-10-06)

Internet gaming youth not more prone to psychiatric disorders
Children who show addiction-like gaming signs are not any more susceptible to mental health problems than their non-gaming peers. Some even experience less anxiety than others. (2020-10-01)

15-year trend persists in disparate insulin pump use in children
Insulin pumps are widely used in the management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and reviews have shown insulin pump therapy to be associated with improved glycemic control, fewer severe hypoglycemia events, and improved quality of life. Yet, non-Hispanic white children (NHW) are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic Black children (NHB) to use this technology. (2020-10-01)

Children hold leaders primarily responsible, not entitled
Researchers explored how young children conceptualize leadership, specifically whether they view leaders primarily as more entitled individuals or more responsible individuals, relative to non-leaders. The findings showed that they expected a leader to contribute more to a joint goal than its non-leader partner, expected a leader to withdraw an equal share from the common prize, and judged a leader more harshly than a non-leader for not adhering to these two behaviors. (2020-09-30)

Heart disease in young people may be linked to diabetes exposure in the womb
Heart disease in young adults and teenagers may be related to exposure to diabetes in the womb, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190797. (2020-09-28)

Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found. (2020-09-28)

New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said. (2020-09-24)

Online training helps preemies
An international team of researchers has now found that computerised training can support preterm children's academic success. In their randomised controlled study ''Fit for School'', the researchers compared two learning apps. The project at the University Hospital Essen and at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum was funded by Mercator Research Center Ruhr (Mercur) with approximately 300,000 Euros for four years. Results have been published online as unedited manuscript in the journal Pediatric Research on 12 September 2020. (2020-09-21)

Evaluating impacts of COVID-19 lockdowns on children and young people
Children, who appear at a relatively lower risk from COVID-19, are disproportionally harmed by precautions involved with lockdowns, say Matthew Snape and Russell Viner in a Perspective. (2020-09-21)

Children with COVID-19 show different immune responses, but better outcomes than adults
A comparison of children and adults hospitalized with COVID-19 reveals pediatric patients, who had better outcomes and shorter hospital stays, displayed altered immune responses and more limited production of antibodies against infection. (2020-09-21)

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children. (2020-09-17)

Machine learning models identify kids at risk of lead poisoning
Machine learning can help public health officials identify children most at risk of lead poisoning, enabling them to concentrate their limited resources on preventing poisonings rather than remediating homes only after a child suffers elevated blood lead levels, a new study shows. (2020-09-16)

Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age
Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-09-10)

Case study describes unexpected diagnosis of one of the first cases of MIS-C in US
At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in April, a 14-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency department at Nemours Children's Health System in Delaware with mysterious symptoms in what would later be identified as one of the first cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) in the U.S. His care and retrospective diagnosis have been published in Progress in Pediatric Cardiology as a timely case study. (2020-09-09)

The marshmallow test revisited
Children will wait longer for a treat to impress others, new psychology experiments show. (2020-09-09)

New insights into why people with down syndrome are at higher risk for leukemia
Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago were the first to examine endothelial cells - one of the main sources of blood production - for clues as to why people with Down syndrome have higher prevalence of leukemia. They identified a new set of genes that are overexpressed in endothelial cells of patients with Down syndrome. (2020-09-08)

UC study: Secondhand smoke sends more kids to the hospital
Children who are exposed to tobacco have higher rates of hospital admissions after visiting emergency departments or urgent care facilities, according to a new study by University of Cincinnati researchers. The study, set to be published in October in Pediatric Research and currently available online, found that tobacco smoke exposure also increased the risk of pediatric patients having respiratory-related procedures performed while in the emergency department, as well as medications prescribed. (2020-09-08)

Children with asthma could benefit from prescribing according to genetic differences
Selecting treatments according to genetic differences could help children and teenagers with asthma, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The trial, which compares patients treated according to small genetic differences with patients treated according to existing guidelines, is the first of its kind in children and teenagers. (2020-09-07)

Children can have COVID-19 antibodies and virus in their system simultaneously
With many questions remaining around how children spread COVID-19, Children's National Hospital researchers set out to improve the understanding of how long it takes pediatric patients with the virus to clear it from their systems, and at what point they start to make antibodies that work against the coronavirus. The study, published Sept. 3 in the Journal of Pediatrics, finds that the virus and antibodies can coexist in young patients. (2020-09-03)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.