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Current Children News and Events

Current Children News and Events, Children News Articles.
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National poll: Half of parents have declined kids' play date invites
Parents' top concerns about playdates include children being unsupervised, hearing inappropriate language, getting into medications and harmful substances, and getting injured. (2019-10-21)
New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling. (2019-10-15)
Painless tape strips used to detect molecular changes in skin of children with eczema
In a study using non-invasive tape strips in young children with eczema (or atopic dermatitis), researchers found many molecular signs of immune dysfunction and skin changes that relate to disease activity. (2019-10-15)
New DNA 'clock' could help measure development in young children
Scientists have developed a molecular 'clock' that could reshape how pediatricians measure and monitor childhood growth and potentially allow for an earlier diagnosis of life-altering development disorders. (2019-10-15)
Weak immune system linked to serious bacterial infection in children
A new study has found a bacterial infection that can lead to pneumonia or meningitis is linked to weakened immune systems in children. (2019-10-14)
Children associate white, but not black, men with 'brilliant' stereotype, new study finds
The stereotype that associates being 'brilliant' with white men more than White women is shared by children regardless of their own race, finds a team of psychology researchers. (2019-10-10)
Autism spectrum disorders linked with excess weight gain in children
A recent meta-analysis published in Obesity Reviews revealed that children with autism spectrum disorders had a 41.1% higher risk of developing obesity than matched groups of children, and on average, 22 out of 100 children with autism were found to have obesity. (2019-10-09)
How do children express their state of knowledge of the world around them?
A study published in Journal of Language, Learning and Development by researchers with the Prosodic Studies Group led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor with the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, reveals for the first time that three-year-olds use gestural and prosodic precursors in the expression of uncertainty, which they will express after five years of age through lexical cues. (2019-10-09)
Ethnically diverse mothers, children living in poverty at risk for sleep problems
African-American and other ethnically diverse mothers know the value of a good night's sleep, but they and their young children are at risk for developing sleep problems if they live in urban poverty, a Rutgers study finds. (2019-10-09)
Fish in early childhood reduces risk of disease
It doesn't take that much fish for young children to reap big health benefits. (2019-10-08)
Children's language skills may be harmed by social hardship
Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are three times more likely to develop difficulties with language than those from more affluent areas, research suggests. (2019-10-08)
Screening kindergarten readiness
University of Missouri College of Education researchers have found that a readiness test can predict kindergarteners' success in school after 18 months. (2019-10-08)
Ethiopian parents can't make up for effects of life shocks on children by spending more on education
Ethiopian parents try to level out the life chances least-advantaged children affected by early life shocks such as famine and low rainfall levels by investing more in their education. (2019-10-07)
Physical activity and good fitness improve cardiac regulation in children
A recent Finnish study showed that more physically active and fit children have better cardiac regulation than less active and fit children. (2019-10-02)
Gut bacteria is key factor in childhood obesity
New information published by scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Health suggests that gut bacteria and its interactions with immune cells and metabolic organs, including fat tissue, play a key role in childhood obesity. (2019-10-02)
Mild-to-moderate hearing loss in children leads to changes in how brain processes sound
Deafness in early childhood is known to lead to lasting changes in how sounds are processed in the brain, but new research published today in eLife shows that even mild-to-moderate levels of hearing loss in young children can lead to similar changes. (2019-10-01)
Gendered play in hunter-gatherer children strongly influenced by community demographics
The gendered play of children from 2 hunter-gatherer societies is strongly influenced by the demographics of their communities and the gender roles modelled by the adults around them, a new study finds. (2019-09-26)
Studies link air pollution to mental health issues in children
Three new studies by scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Cincinnati, highlight the relationship between air pollution and mental health in children. (2019-09-25)
Exploring the risk of ALL in children with Down syndrome
Researchers discovered new clues that provide a better understanding of why children with Down syndrome have an increased risk of leukemia. (2019-09-24)
New study on sharing shows social norms play a role in decision making
A child's desire to share becomes influenced by social norms around the age of 8, new research has revealed. (2019-09-23)
Kindness is a top priority in a long-term partner according to a new international study
One of the top qualities that we look for in a long-term partner is kindness, according to new research by Swansea University. (2019-09-19)
A single dose of yellow fever vaccine does not offer lasting protection to all children
José Enrique Mejía, Inserm researcher at Unit 1043 Center for Pathophysiology of Toulouse Purpan and Cristina Domingo from the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin have recently shown that around half of children initially protected by the yellow fever vaccination at 9 months of age lose that protection within the next 2 to 5 years, due to disappearance of the neutralizing antibodies. (2019-09-19)
Developmental psychology -- One good turn deserves another
Five-year-olds enforce reciprocal behavior in social interactions. A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich psychologists shows that children come to recognize reciprocity as a norm between the ages of 3 and 5. (2019-09-18)
Off-label medication orders on the rise for children, Rutgers study finds
US physicians are increasingly ordering medications for children for conditions that are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration, according to a Rutgers study. (2019-09-16)
Play equipment that gets kids moving
Parents will be pleased to know that more is not always better when it comes to play equipment for their children. (2019-09-16)
Children of refugees with PTSD are at higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied what it means for children to have parents who are refugees and have PTSD. (2019-09-13)
Poor motor skills predict long-term language impairments for children with autism
Fine motor skills - used for eating, writing and buttoning clothing - may be a strong predictor for identifying whether children with autism are at risk for long-term language disabilities, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-09-11)
Study: Adults' actions, successes, failures, and words affect young children's persistence
Children's persistence in the face of challenges is key to learning and academic success. (2019-09-10)
Study: Children are interested in politics but need better education from parents and schools
The 2020 election is approaching -- how should we talk with children about this election and about politics more broadly? (2019-09-10)
Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance
Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. (2019-09-09)
Children of anxious mothers twice as likely to have hyperactivity in adolescence
A large study has shown that children of mothers who are anxious during pregnancy and in the first few years of the child's life have twice the risk of having hyperactivity symptoms at age 16. (2019-09-08)
One-third of young children admitted to intensive care for sepsis show PTSD symptoms years later
Doctors have found that children who have been in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) for sepsis have a significantly increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with around one-third showing PTSD symptoms. (2019-09-07)
Speech impairment in five-year-old international adoptees with cleft palate
In a group of internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate, speech at age five is impaired compared to a corresponding group of children born in Sweden, a study shows. (2019-09-06)
Having an elder brother is associated with slower language development
Several studies had already demonstrated that children who have an elder sibling have poorer linguistic performance than those who have none. (2019-09-05)
Better seizure control with ketogenic diet in infants with genetic epilepsy
Research shows that starting infants as young as 3 weeks old on the ketogenic diet is effective in treating epilepsy. (2019-08-27)
Head start programs alleviate supply gap of center-based childcare in NJ
The availability of Head Start and Early Head Start in New Jersey, federal programs designed to serve low-income families' childcare needs, reduces the likelihood that a community will experience a severe childcare supply gap, a Rutgers-led study found. (2019-08-26)
White parents' racial bias awareness associated with greater willingness to discuss race
A new Northwestern University study found that white parents' racial bias awareness was associated with greater willingness to discuss race with their children, along with increased color consciousness and decreased color blindness. (2019-08-26)
Canadian children's diet quality during school hours improves over 11-year period
Surveys taken 11 years apart show a 13% improvement in the quality of foods consumed by Canadian children during school hours. (2019-08-26)
Low levels of vitamin D in elementary school could spell trouble in adolescence
Vitamin D deficiency in middle childhood could result in aggressive behavior as well as anxious and depressive moods during adolescence, according to a new University of Michigan study of school children in Bogotá, Colombia. (2019-08-20)
More children suffer head injuries playing recreational sport than team sport
An Australian/ New Zealand study examining childhood head injuries has found that children who do recreational sports like horse riding, skate boarding and bike riding are more likely to suffer serious head injuries than children who play contact sport like AFL or rugby. (2019-08-20)
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