Nav: Home

Current Chimpanzees News and Events

Current Chimpanzees News and Events, Chimpanzees News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 20 | 795 Results
Like humans, aging wild chimpanzees value their more "positive" friendships most
Like humans, wild chimpanzees focus on fewer yet more meaningful friendships as they grow older, say researchers who studied male chimps over two decades. (2020-10-22)
How'd we get so picky about friendship late in life? Ask the chimps
When humans age, they tend to favor small circles of meaningful, already established friendships rather than seek new ones. (2020-10-22)
Research shows aging chimps, like humans, value friendships
Chimpanzee and human friendships show many parallels, according to new research published this week in Science by associate professor Martin Muller at The University of New Mexico Anthropology department, associate professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Comparative Human and Primate Physiology Center Melissa Emery Thompson, and their colleagues. (2020-10-22)
Building blocks of language evolved 30-40 million years ago
The capacity for language is built upon our ability to understand combinations of words and the relationships between them, but the evolutionary history of this ability is little understood. (2020-10-21)
Cognitive elements of language have existed for 40 million years
Humans are not the only beings that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions -- monkeys and great apes can do so, too, a study at the University of Zurich has shown. (2020-10-21)
Molecular mechanism of cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses
A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) showed that gorilla APOBEC3G potentially plays a role in inhibiting SIVcpz replication. (2020-10-07)
Evolution of the Y chromosome in great apes deciphered
New analysis of the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosomes from all living species of the great ape family helps to clarify our understanding of how this enigmatic chromosome evolved. (2020-10-06)
Looking at evolution's genealogy from home
Evolution leaves its traces in particular in genomes. A team headed by Dr. (2020-09-28)
Primate brain size does not predict their intelligence
A research team from the German Primate Center has systematically investigated the cognitive abilities of lemurs, which have relatively small brains compared to other primates. (2020-09-25)
Researchers find cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees, humans
Doctors like to remind patients not to monkey around with their health, suggesting that a good diet and regular exercise improve longevity. (2020-09-21)
Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
Many humans live to see their 80s, some even reach 100. (2020-09-20)
Like humans, chimpanzees can suffer for life if orphaned before adulthood
A new study from the Tai Chimpanzee Project in Ivory Coast and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, shows that orphaned male chimpanzees are less competitive and have fewer offspring of their own than those who continue to live with their mothers. (2020-09-18)
Chimpanzees show greater behavioural and cultural diversity in more variable environments
An international team led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) has investigated the influence of environmental variability on the behavioural repertoires of 144 social groups. (2020-09-15)
Differing diets of bonobo groups may offer insights into how culture is created
Besides humans, many other social animals are believed to exhibit forms of culture in various ways, too. (2020-09-01)
Termite-fishing chimpanzees provide clues to the evolution of technology
Unlike chimpanzees in East and West Africa, who use a single tool to extract termites, chimpanzees in Central Africa's Congo Basin use tool sets--puncturing sticks or perforating twigs plus fishing probes--to harvest the insects from underground nests or towering earthen mounds scattered across lowland forests. (2020-08-19)
Big brains and dexterous hands
Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. (2020-07-24)
For chimpanzees, salt and pepper hair not a marker of old age
Silver strands and graying hair is a sign of aging in humans, but things aren't so simple for our closest ape relatives--the chimpanzee. (2020-07-14)
Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. (2020-06-25)
In the wild, chimpanzees are more motivated to cooperate than bonobos
Scientists investigated cooperation dynamics in wild chimpanzees (Tai, Ivory Coast) and bonobos (LuiKotale, DCR) using a snake model. (2020-06-24)
What it means when animals have beliefs
Humans are not the only ones who have beliefs; animals do too, although it is more difficult to prove them than with humans. (2020-06-17)
A rare heart bone is discovered in chimpanzees
Experts from the University of Nottingham have discovered that some chimpanzees have a bone in their heart, which could be vital in managing their health and conservation. (2020-06-10)
Ebola transmission risks would be taken more seriously with ground-up interventions
A study led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found significant differences in disease risk perception and channels of information about Ebola virus disease (EVD) in rural areas and urban centres of Guinea, West Africa. (2020-06-10)
Scientists made a single-cell-resolution map of brain genes in humans and other primates
A group of scientists led by Philipp Khaitovich, a professor at Skoltech, conducted a large-scale study of gene expression in 33 different brain regions of humans, chimpanzees, macaques and bonobos using the single-cell-resolution transcriptomics technologies and made a map of the different brain regions with their specific cell structures. (2020-06-04)
In chimpanzees, females contribute to the protection of the territory
Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, extensively studied several neighboring groups of western chimpanzees and their findings reveal that females and even the entire group may play a more important role in between-group competition than previously thought. (2020-05-27)
Cultural diversity in chimpanzees
Termite fishing by chimpanzees was thought to occur in only two forms with one or multiple tools, from either above-ground or underground termite nests. (2020-05-26)
Similar to humans, chimpanzees develop slowly
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have systematically investigated developmental milestones in wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park (Ivory Coast) and found that they develop slowly, requiring more than five years to reach key motor, communication and social milestones. (2020-05-26)
Chimpanzees help trace the evolution of human speech back to ancient ancestors
One of the most promising theories for the evolution of human speech has finally received support from chimpanzee communication, in a study conducted by a group of researchers led by the University of Warwick. (2020-05-26)
The genome of chimpanzees and gorillas could help to better understand human tumors
A new study by researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), a joint center of UPF and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), shows that, surprisingly, the distribution of mutations in human tumors is more similar to that of chimpanzees and gorillas than that of humans. (2020-05-21)
Lifestyle trumps geography in determining makeup of gut microbiome
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis studied the gut microbiomes of wild apes in the Republic of Congo, of captive apes in zoos in the US, and of people from around the world and discovered that lifestyle is more important than geography or even species in determining the makeup of the gut microbiome. (2020-04-06)
Lucy had an ape-like brain
A new study led by paleoanthropologists Philipp Gunz and Simon Neubauer from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reveals that Lucy's species Australopithecus afarensis had an ape-like brain. (2020-04-01)
Skull scans reveal evolutionary secrets of fossil brains
Three-million-year old brain imprints in fossil skulls of the species Australopithecus afarensis (famous for 'Lucy' and 'Selam' from Ethiopia) shed new light on the evolution of brain growth and organization. (2020-04-01)
Ancient hominins had small brains like apes, but longer childhoods like humans
Using precise imaging technology to scan fossil skulls, researchers found that as early as 3 million years ago, children had a long dependence on caregivers. (2020-04-01)
Research identifies regular climbing behavior in a human ancestor
A new study led by the University of Kent has found evidence that human ancestors as recent as two million years ago may have regularly climbed trees. (2020-03-30)
'Little Foot' skull reveals how this more than 3 million year old human ancestor lived
High-resolution micro-CT scanning of the skull of the fossil specimen known as 'Little Foot' has revealed some aspects of how this Australopithecus species used to live more than 3 million years ago. (2020-03-17)
Study finds gorillas display territorial behavior
Scientists have discovered that gorillas really are territorial -- and their behavior is very similar to our own. (2020-03-12)
Your back pain may be due to evolution and spine shape
The cause of back pain can be linked to humanity's evolutionary past, according to new research from a team of bioarchaeologists at Simon Fraser University, the University of Liverpool, and the University of Sydney. (2020-03-05)
Survival of the fittest: How primate immunodeficiency viruses are evolving
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that unlike immunodeficiency viruses (IVs) that infect other primates, the IV that infects the greater spot-nosed monkey is able to antagonize human BST-2 to survive and proliferate. (2020-03-03)
Crops provide chimpanzees with more energy than wild foods
A University of Kent study has found that cultivated foods offer chimpanzees in West Africa more energetic benefits than wild foods available in the region. (2020-02-17)
Adolescent male chimps still need their mamas
Even kids who are nearly grown still need a parental figure to help them navigate the long path to adulthood -- and our closest animal relatives are no exception. (2020-02-17)
Researchers were not right about left brains
The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. (2020-02-14)
Page 1 of 20 | 795 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.