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Current Chromosomes News and Events

Current Chromosomes News and Events, Chromosomes News Articles.
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Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes
While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago. (2019-11-13)
Crick researchers unravel protective properties of telomere t-loops
Loops at the ends of telomeres play a vital protective role preventing irretrievable damage to chromosomes, according to new research from the Crick. (2019-11-13)
New tool facilitates genetic mapping of polyploid plants
Available online for free, polyploid mapping system developed in Brazil helps breeders of sugarcane, kiwi, blueberry, sweet potato and forages, among other crops. (2019-11-08)
Neural network fills in data gaps for spatial analysis of chromosomes
Computational methods used to fill in missing pixels in low-quality images or video also can help scientists provide missing information for how DNA is organized in the cell, computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have shown. (2019-11-07)
Complex cellular machine visualized to yield new insights in cancer
Cellular machines that control chromosome structure, such as the RSC complex, are mutated in about one-fifth of all human cancers. (2019-10-31)
New organelle that helps prevent cancer discovered in our cells
Scientists have discovered a strange structure inside our cells that helps to prevent cancer by ensuring genetic material is sorted correctly as cells divide. (2019-10-22)
Defining the centromere
Centromeres are the chromosomal domains at which the kinetochore, a protein complex required for the correct separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis, is assembled. (2019-10-21)
Genes linked to sex ratio and male fertility in mice
Michigan Medicine researchers find genes that help maintain the 50-50 balance between male and female offspring in mice--and that have major implications for male infertility. (2019-10-18)
Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial DNA from archaic hominins
Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial genetic variants that they inherited from archaic Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
X marks the spot: recombination in structurally distinct chromosomes
A recent study from the laboratory of Stowers Investigator Scott Hawley, PhD, has revealed more details about how the synaptonemal complex performs its job, including some surprising subtleties in function. (2019-10-16)
Buttons and flies help Hopkins solve longtime DNA mystery
Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development. (2019-10-10)
How chromosomes change their shape during cell differentiation
Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research have provided an explanation of how chromosomes undergo structural changes during cell differentiation. (2019-10-09)
Researchers are finding molecular mechanisms behind women's biological clock
Throughout life, women's fertility curve goes up and down, and in a new study led by the University of Copenhagen, researchers have now shown why. (2019-10-09)
Breakthrough in sex-chromosome regulation
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have uncovered a chromosome-wide mechanism that keeps the gene expression of sex chromosomes in balance in our cells. (2019-10-03)
How newly found tension sensor plays integral role in aligned chromosome partitioning
A Waseda University-led research found that oncogene SET/TAF1, which was found to be a proto-oncogene of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), contributes to proper chromosome partitioning as a tension sensor. (2019-09-30)
Cancer: The origin of genetic mutations
In the presence of some disruptive elements, cancer cells are unable to replicate its DNA optimally. (2019-09-25)
Key similarities discovered between human and archaea chromosomes
A study led by Indiana University is the first to reveal key similarities between chromosomes in humans and archaea. (2019-09-19)
How microtubules branch in new directions, a first look in animals
Cell biologist Thomas Maresca and senior research fellow Vikash Verma at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say they have, for the first time, directly observed and recorded in animal cells a pathway called branching microtubule nucleation, a mechanism in cell division that had been imaged in cellular extracts and plant cells but not directly observed in animal cells. (2019-09-13)
Chinese scientists update soybean genome to a golden reference
Soybean is one of the most important crops worldwide. A high-quality reference genome will facilitate its functional analysis and molecular breeding. (2019-09-12)
Stem cell researchers reactivate 'back-up genes' in the lab
Vincent Pasque and his team at KU Leuven have unravelled parts of a mechanism that may one day help to treat Rett syndrome and other genetic disorders linked to the X chromosome. (2019-09-12)
Gene coding error found in rare, inherited gene cof lung-scarring disorder linked to short telomeres
By combing through the entire genetic sequences of a person with a lung scarring disease and 13 of the person's relatives, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found a coding error in a single gene that is likely responsible for a rare form of the disease and the abnormally short protective DNA caps on chromosomes long associated with it. (2019-09-10)
Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT
Study in PNAS shows that trapping TERT mRNA in the cell nucleus may keep TERT oncogene from being manufactured, silencing the action of TERT in driving cancer. (2019-09-10)
New results on fungal genetics
An international team of researchers has found unusual genetic features in fungi of the order Trichosporonales. (2019-09-09)
Salk scientists develop technique to reveal epigenetic features of cells in the brain
Salk researchers combined two different analysis techniques into one method, to simultaneously analyze how chromosomes, along with their epigenetic features, are compacted inside of single human brain cells. (2019-09-09)
The paradox of different house flies with few genetic differences
University of Houston evolutionary biologist Richard Meisel has published findings on sex determinates of house flies. (2019-09-05)
Fat-absorbing XX chromosomes raise heart disease risk in women
New research in mice at the University of Kentucky has confirmed that the presence of XX sex chromosomes increases the amount of fat circulating in the blood, which leads to narrowing of the arteries and ultimately a higher risk of heart attacks and coronary artery disease. (2019-09-03)
Mystery solved about the machines that move your genes
Researchers have discovered how the chromosome-dividing spindle avoids slowdowns: congestion. (2019-09-02)
The genealogy of important broiler ancestor revealed
A new study examines the historical and genetic origins of the White Plymouth Rock chicken, an important contributor to today's meat chickens (broilers). (2019-08-27)
Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay
A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay -- it's likely to expand its territory. (2019-08-26)
Queen bees face increased chance of execution if they mate with two males rather than one
Queen stingless bees face an increased risk of being executed by worker bees if they mate with two males rather than one, according to new research by the University of Sussex and the University of São Paulo. (2019-08-20)
A simpler way to choose the sex of offspring by separating X and Y sperm
A simple, reversible chemical treatment can segregate X-bearing sperm from Y-bearing sperm, allowing dramatic alteration of the normal 50/50 male/female offspring ratio, according to a new study by Masayuki Shimada and colleagues at Hiroshima University, published on Aug. (2019-08-13)
Protective protein guards against DNA damage & could help target fast growing cancer cells
The discovery that an essential protein plays a protective role during cell division, could open the door to better targeted treatment of fast-growing cancer cells. (2019-07-31)
Human artificial chromosomes bypass centromere roadblocks
Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) could be useful tools for both understanding how mammalian chromosomes function and creating synthetic biological systems, but for the last 20 years, they have been limited by an inefficient artificial centromere. (2019-07-25)
Penn biochemists streamline construction method for human artificial chromosomes
Researchers describe a new way to form an essential part of the artificial chromosome, called the centromere, by bypassing the biological requirements needed to form a natural one. (2019-07-25)
Overstuffed cancer cells may have an Achilles' heel
In a study using yeast cells and data from cancer cell lines, Johns Hopkins University scientists report they have found a potential weak spot among cancer cells that have extra sets of chromosomes, the structures that carry genetic material. (2019-07-22)
CNIO researchers find a method to select for mammalian cells with half the number of chromosomes
Since the emergence of molecular genetics, scientists have tried to isolate haploid mammalian cells. (2019-07-16)
Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?
Molecular biologists long thought that domains in the genome's 3D organization control how genes are expressed. (2019-07-15)
Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division
Mitosis is the process by which the genetic information encoded on chromosomes is equally distributed to two daughter cells, a fundamental feature of all life on earth. (2019-07-11)
Super-resolution microscopy illuminates associations between chromosomes
Thanks to super-resolution microscopy, scientists have now been able to unambiguously identify physical associations between human chromosomes. (2019-07-03)
Archaeological mystery solved with modern genetics
Researchers at the University of Tokyo conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands of modern-day Japan. (2019-06-20)
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