Nav: Home

Current Chromosomes News and Events

Current Chromosomes News and Events, Chromosomes News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
How microtubules branch in new directions, a first look in animals
Cell biologist Thomas Maresca and senior research fellow Vikash Verma at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say they have, for the first time, directly observed and recorded in animal cells a pathway called branching microtubule nucleation, a mechanism in cell division that had been imaged in cellular extracts and plant cells but not directly observed in animal cells. (2019-09-13)
Chinese scientists update soybean genome to a golden reference
Soybean is one of the most important crops worldwide. A high-quality reference genome will facilitate its functional analysis and molecular breeding. (2019-09-12)
Stem cell researchers reactivate 'back-up genes' in the lab
Vincent Pasque and his team at KU Leuven have unravelled parts of a mechanism that may one day help to treat Rett syndrome and other genetic disorders linked to the X chromosome. (2019-09-12)
Gene coding error found in rare, inherited gene cof lung-scarring disorder linked to short telomeres
By combing through the entire genetic sequences of a person with a lung scarring disease and 13 of the person's relatives, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found a coding error in a single gene that is likely responsible for a rare form of the disease and the abnormally short protective DNA caps on chromosomes long associated with it. (2019-09-10)
Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT
Study in PNAS shows that trapping TERT mRNA in the cell nucleus may keep TERT oncogene from being manufactured, silencing the action of TERT in driving cancer. (2019-09-10)
New results on fungal genetics
An international team of researchers has found unusual genetic features in fungi of the order Trichosporonales. (2019-09-09)
Salk scientists develop technique to reveal epigenetic features of cells in the brain
Salk researchers combined two different analysis techniques into one method, to simultaneously analyze how chromosomes, along with their epigenetic features, are compacted inside of single human brain cells. (2019-09-09)
The paradox of different house flies with few genetic differences
University of Houston evolutionary biologist Richard Meisel has published findings on sex determinates of house flies. (2019-09-05)
Fat-absorbing XX chromosomes raise heart disease risk in women
New research in mice at the University of Kentucky has confirmed that the presence of XX sex chromosomes increases the amount of fat circulating in the blood, which leads to narrowing of the arteries and ultimately a higher risk of heart attacks and coronary artery disease. (2019-09-03)
Mystery solved about the machines that move your genes
Researchers have discovered how the chromosome-dividing spindle avoids slowdowns: congestion. (2019-09-02)
The genealogy of important broiler ancestor revealed
A new study examines the historical and genetic origins of the White Plymouth Rock chicken, an important contributor to today's meat chickens (broilers). (2019-08-27)
Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay
A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay -- it's likely to expand its territory. (2019-08-26)
Queen bees face increased chance of execution if they mate with two males rather than one
Queen stingless bees face an increased risk of being executed by worker bees if they mate with two males rather than one, according to new research by the University of Sussex and the University of São Paulo. (2019-08-20)
A simpler way to choose the sex of offspring by separating X and Y sperm
A simple, reversible chemical treatment can segregate X-bearing sperm from Y-bearing sperm, allowing dramatic alteration of the normal 50/50 male/female offspring ratio, according to a new study by Masayuki Shimada and colleagues at Hiroshima University, published on Aug. (2019-08-13)
Protective protein guards against DNA damage & could help target fast growing cancer cells
The discovery that an essential protein plays a protective role during cell division, could open the door to better targeted treatment of fast-growing cancer cells. (2019-07-31)
Human artificial chromosomes bypass centromere roadblocks
Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) could be useful tools for both understanding how mammalian chromosomes function and creating synthetic biological systems, but for the last 20 years, they have been limited by an inefficient artificial centromere. (2019-07-25)
Penn biochemists streamline construction method for human artificial chromosomes
Researchers describe a new way to form an essential part of the artificial chromosome, called the centromere, by bypassing the biological requirements needed to form a natural one. (2019-07-25)
Overstuffed cancer cells may have an Achilles' heel
In a study using yeast cells and data from cancer cell lines, Johns Hopkins University scientists report they have found a potential weak spot among cancer cells that have extra sets of chromosomes, the structures that carry genetic material. (2019-07-22)
CNIO researchers find a method to select for mammalian cells with half the number of chromosomes
Since the emergence of molecular genetics, scientists have tried to isolate haploid mammalian cells. (2019-07-16)
Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?
Molecular biologists long thought that domains in the genome's 3D organization control how genes are expressed. (2019-07-15)
Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division
Mitosis is the process by which the genetic information encoded on chromosomes is equally distributed to two daughter cells, a fundamental feature of all life on earth. (2019-07-11)
Super-resolution microscopy illuminates associations between chromosomes
Thanks to super-resolution microscopy, scientists have now been able to unambiguously identify physical associations between human chromosomes. (2019-07-03)
Archaeological mystery solved with modern genetics
Researchers at the University of Tokyo conducted a census of the Japanese population around 2,500 years ago using the Y chromosomes of men living on the main islands of modern-day Japan. (2019-06-20)
Landmark study signals shift in thinking about stem cell differentiation
Researchers found that embryonic stem cells commit to a cell fate far more rapidly than anticipated. (2019-06-20)
Canadian researchers discover new genetic link to premenopausal breast cancer
University of Alberta researchers have added a new genetic marker to the breast cancer map, helping to expand the list of genetic mutations clinicians can watch for in cancer screenings. (2019-06-20)
B chromosome first -- mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered
B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes, which often are preferentially inherited and showcase an increased transmission rate. (2019-06-20)
Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA
Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. (2019-06-18)
Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act
The single-celled parasite Leishmania can reproduce sexually, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-06-13)
Nuclear architecture: What organizes the genome in the nucleus?
Spatial separation of active from inactive fractions of the genome in the cell nucleus is crucial for gene expression control. (2019-06-06)
Cell division requires a balanced level of non-coding RNA for chromosome stability
Assistant Professor Dr Karen Wing Yee Yuen and Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Yick Hin Ling from the School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong (HKU), discovered that centromeric DNA is used as a template to produce a non-protein coding, centromeric RNA (ribonucleic acid), that is essential for chromosome stability. (2019-05-22)
New role in spatial chromosome organization identified for often mutated cancer protein
New research from The Wistar Institute sheds light on the function of the ARID1A protein, encoded by a gene that is among the most frequently mutated across human cancers. (2019-05-22)
Danish research team identifies the first gene that increases the risk of fainting
Fainting is not solely caused by external factors. Your genes also play a part. (2019-05-16)
Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe. (2019-05-13)
Measuring chromosome imbalance could clarify cancer prognosis
Researchers have found that higher levels of aneuploidy lead to much greater lethality among prostate cancer patients. (2019-05-13)
First major study of proteins in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
The most common form of childhood cancer is acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). (2019-04-25)
Multiple myeloma: DNA rearrangement may predict poor outcomes
In multiple myeloma, Ig lambda translocations may indicate poor outcomes and resistance to immunomodulatory drugs such as lenalidomide. (2019-04-23)
Cell biology: The complexity of division by two
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division. (2019-04-15)
New role for a driver of metastatic cancers
Metastatic ovarian, prostate and breast cancers are notoriously difficult to treat and often deadly. (2019-04-02)
The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed
Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. (2019-04-01)
Origin of Scandinavian wolves clarified
There are no signs that hybrids of dog and wolf have contributed to the Scandinavian wolf population -- a matter that has been discussed, especially in Norway. (2019-03-29)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...