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Current Chromosomes News and Events

Current Chromosomes News and Events, Chromosomes News Articles.
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Study documents paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm
Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. (2018-10-17)
How yeast cells detect genetic infections
ETH researchers studying yeast cells have discovered a surprisingly located new mechanism for detecting foreign genetic material -- whether from pathogens or environmental contamination -- and rendering it harmless. (2018-10-11)
Chromosomal instability may predict patients that will benefit from colorectal cancer drug
Researchers at RCSI, along with international collaborators within the ANGIOPREDICT research consortium, have discovered that chromosomal instability (where whole human chromosomes or parts of chromosomes are duplicated or deleted) may predict which patients will receive most benefit from a key drug used to treat colorectal cancer (Avastin). (2018-10-10)
The chromosome responsible for asparagus gender is characterized
A University of Cordoba research project draws a genetic map of garden asparagus and marks the chromosome determining gender. (2018-10-08)
Success is sweet: Researchers unlock the mysteries of the sugarcane genome
For centuries, sugarcane has supplied human societies with alcohol, biofuel, building and weaving materials, and the world's most relied-upon source of sugar. (2018-10-08)
Molecular guardians monitor chromosomes during cell division
One of the worst things that can happen to a cell is to end up with the wrong number of chromosomes. (2018-10-04)
Exercise reduces stress, improves cellular health in family caregivers
Exercising at least three times a week for six months reduced stress in a group of family caregivers and even appeared to lengthen a small section of their chromosomes that is believed to slow cellular aging, new UBC research has found (2018-10-03)
'Cellular memory' of DNA damage in oocyte quality control
Females are born with a finite number of eggs that come from a much larger pool of millions of precursor cells. (2018-09-27)
Jumping genes work together to control programmed deletion in the genome
Scientists have discovered a new family of molecules that work together to precisely remove unwanted DNA during reproduction in single-celled, freshwater organisms called ciliates. (2018-09-18)
How a virus destabilizes the genome
New insights into how Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) induces genome instability and promotes cell proliferation could lead to the development of novel antiviral therapies for KSHV-associated cancers, according to a study published Sept. (2018-09-13)
Jumping genes drive sex chromosome changes in strawberries
The discovery shows that plant sex regions can 'jump' and indicates that the phenomenon may be adaptive by gathering and locking new genes into linkage with sex. (2018-09-10)
Researchers develop 'cytological ruler' to build 3D map of human genome
It has been almost 20 years since the human genome was first sequenced, but researchers still know little about how the genome is folded up and organized within cells. (2018-08-28)
3D cell environment key for divvying up chromosomes -- find could explain cancer hallmark
Epithelial cells grown on a plastic dish are worse at segregating their chromosomes than epithelial cells growing in mice, a new study shows. (2018-08-23)
Researchers discover key mechanism of DNA replication
Researchers from Osaka University in Japan have uncovered a key control mechanism of DNA replication with potential implications for better understanding how cells maintain genetic information to prevent diseases or cancer. (2018-08-16)
'Traffic wardens' of cells can be counterproductive
A research team from the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência and the Centre for Biomedical Research/University of Algarve, found that a mechanism of cell division control can be associated with an increase of errors in chromosomes distribution. (2018-08-16)
The wheat code is finally cracked
The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published today in the international journal Science a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop. (2018-08-16)
Wheat code finally cracked; wheat genome sequence will bring stronger varieties to farmers
Kansas State University scientists, in collaboration with the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, published today in the international journal Science a detailed description of the complete genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop. (2018-08-16)
Discovery of a new tumor suppressor previously thought to be an oncogene
A gene that has for decades been considered a tumor promoter, the PLK1 gene, can also perform the exact opposite function: halting the development of cancer. (2018-08-07)
Genetic 'toolkit' helps periwinkles gain advantage on the seashore
Periwinkles, struggling to survive the seashore battleground, have developed a genetic 'toolkit' to help them adapt to different environments, a new study shows. (2018-08-07)
Genetic screening before embryo transfer fails to improve the chance of a baby
The genetic screening of fertilized eggs for embryo selection in assisted reproduction makes no difference to live birth rates, according to results from the largest published study of its kind. (2018-08-05)
Fish reproduction: Two times a lady
A DNA probing technique clarifies the mechanism behind clonal reproduction of female dojo loach fish, also providing insight into the ancestral origin of the clonal population. (2018-08-02)
Yeast grow -- but can't always breed -- with their sixteen chromosomes fused into two
Baker's yeast survive and grow after a drastic reorganization, not of their genes, but of the chromosome superstructures that house, protect and control access to their DNA code. (2018-08-01)
Unisexual salamander evolution: A long, strange trip
The reproductive history of the unisexual, ladies-only salamander species is full of evolutionary surprises. (2018-07-25)
A protein that promotes compatibility between chromosomes after fertilization
A research team from the Center for Biomedical Research, at the University of Algarve, and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, led by Rui Gonçalo Martinho and Paulo Navarro-Costa has identified the mechanism by which the fertilized egg balances out the differences between chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father. (2018-07-24)
Scientists surmount epigenetic barriers to cloning with two-pronged approach
An international group of researchers have raised the viability of mice that were cloned using a method called somatic cell nuclear transfer, by stimulating two epigenetic factors, and by doing this have shown that creating cloned animals more efficiently will require further work in the area of epigenetics. (2018-07-19)
New control of cell division discovered
When a cell divides, its constituents are usually evenly distributed among the daughter cells. (2018-07-12)
Parental chromosomes kept apart during embryo's first division
It was long thought that during an embryo's first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo's chromosomes into two cells. (2018-07-12)
Protein function repairing genetic damage in spermatogenesis identified
Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology and the Institute for Biotechnology and Biomedicine of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, have unmasked the functioning of a protein involved in DNA repair, ATR, in the meiotic recombination process which takes place during the development of spermatocytes -- sperm precursor cells -- and how inhibiting this protein causes anomalies which block spermatogenesis. (2018-07-09)
Genome's gyrations fit right into Rice University model
Computer models developed at Rice University show that energy landscape theory can predict not only the form of DNA contained in a cell's nucleus during interphase, but also its dynamic behavior. (2018-07-09)
Mayo researchers find off/on switch for DNA repair protein
Damage to DNA is a daily occurrence but one that human cells have evolved to manage. (2018-07-02)
Mutation and 3D modeling reveal new structure to cell division process
Structure of cohesin, a cell division protein, could be much different than expected, study shows. (2018-07-02)
A case of 'kiss and tell': Chromosomal kissing gets less elusive
Chromosomes occupy different territories in the nucleus; their arrangement and communication with each other is still poorly understood. (2018-06-20)
Breast cancer could be prevented by targeting epigenetic proteins, study suggests
Researchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. (2018-06-19)
Non-coding DNA changes the genitals you're born with
Male mice grow ovaries instead of testes if they are missing a small region of DNA that doesn't contain any genes -- a finding that could help explain disorders of sex development in humans, at least half of which have an unknown genetic cause. (2018-06-14)
The cartography of the nucleus
A new technique creates maps of the folded structures of DNA, RNA, and proteins within the cellular nucleus, revealing elegant 'hubs' of organization. (2018-06-08)
Avoiding catastrophe: Yeast study reveals clues to maintaining genome size
Study reveals an unexpected role for a well-known protein machinery in maintaining the correct DNA content with implications for cancer and other diseases. (2018-06-06)
Two-step process underpins upkeep of key protein in cell division
Two complementary processes enable a critical protein, known as CENP-A, to be replenished to enable cells to divide, detailed analysis shows. (2018-06-04)
Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 years
Steelhead trout, a member of the salmon family that live and grow in the Pacific Ocean, genetically adapted to the freshwater environment of Lake Michigan in less than 120 years. (2018-05-31)
Wars and clan structure may explain a strange biological event 7,000 years ago
Genetic data suggest there was a collapse in male, but not female, genetic diversity starting 7,000 years ago. (2018-05-29)
Why do we need one pair of genome?
Scientists have unraveled how the cell replication process destabilizes when it has more, or less, than a pair of chromosome sets, each of which is called a genome -- a major step toward understanding chromosome instability in cancer cells. (2018-05-24)
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