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Current Circadian clock News and Events

Current Circadian clock News and Events, Circadian clock News Articles.
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Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work. (2020-07-09)
Outdoor light linked with teens' sleep and mental health
Research shows that adolescents who live in areas that have high levels of artificial light at night tend to get less sleep and are more likely to have a mood disorder relative to teens who live in areas with low levels of night-time light. (2020-07-08)
How old is your dog in human years? Scientists develop better method than 'multiply by 7'
By mapping molecular changes in the genome over time, UC San Diego researchers developed a formula to more accurately compare dog age to human age -- a tool that could also help them evaluate how well anti-aging products work. (2020-07-02)
A scientific measure of dog years
How old is your tail-wagging bundle of joy in human years? (2020-07-02)
Understanding the circadian clocks of individual cells
Two new studies led by UT Southwestern scientists outline how individual cells maintain their internal clocks, driven both through heritable and random means. (2020-07-01)
New technique may enable all-optical data-center networks
A new technique that synchronises the clocks of computers in under a billionth of a second can eliminate one of the hurdles for the deployment of all-optical networks, potentially leading to more efficient data centres, according to a new study led by UCL and Microsoft. (2020-06-22)
Chronobiology: Researchers identify genes that tell plants when to flower
How do plants know when it is time to flower? (2020-06-22)
The origins of measles: Virus diverged from cattle-infecting relative earlier than thought in history
The measles virus diverged from a closely related cattle-infecting virus in approximately the sixth century BCE - around 1,400 years earlier than current estimates - according to a new study of dozens of measles genomes. (2020-06-18)
NJIT researchers develop easier and faster way to quantify, explore therapeutic proteins
Researchers at New Jersey Institute of Technology in collaboration with Ohio University and Merck & Co. (2020-06-17)
Disrupted circadian rhythms linked to later Parkinson's diagnoses
Older men who have a weak or irregular circadian rhythm guiding their daily cycles of rest and activity are more likely to later develop Parkinson's disease, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences who analyzed 11 years of data for nearly 3,000 independently living older men. (2020-06-15)
Our sleep during lockdown: Longer and more regular, but worse
A survey conducted at the University of Basel and the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel has investigated how sleep has changed during the Covid-19 lockdown. (2020-06-12)
Can your gut microbes tell you how old you really are?
Harvard longevity researchers in collaboration with Insilico Medicine develop the first AI-powered microbiomic aging clock (2020-06-11)
From bacteria to you: The biological reactions that sustain our rhythms
Methylation and the circadian clock are both conserved mechanisms found in all organisms. (2020-06-11)
New 'sun clock' quantifies extreme space weather switch on/off
Extreme space weather events can significantly impact systems such as satellites, communications systems, power distribution and aviation. (2020-06-10)
Clocking in with malaria parasites
Discovery of a malaria parasite's internal clock could lead to new treatment strategies. (2020-06-09)
World's oldest bug is fossil millipede from Scotland
A 425-million-year-old millipede fossil from the Scottish island of Kerrera is the world's oldest 'bug' -- older than any known fossil of an insect, arachnid or other related creepy-crawly, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-05-27)
Circadian oscillation of a cyanobacterium doesn't need all three Kai proteins to keep going
Despite conventional understanding that three Kai proteins are required for the circadian oscillation of cyanobacteria, scientists discovered that even when one of them is destroyed, the oscillation is not completely abolished but instead damped. (2020-05-26)
Malaria parasite ticks to its own internal clock
Researchers have long known that all of the millions of malaria parasites within an infected person's body move through their cell cycle at the same time. (2020-05-14)
Discovery of malaria parasite's clock could pave way to new treatments
The parasite that causes malaria has its own internal clock, explaining the disease's rhythmic fevers and opening new pathways for therapeutics. (2020-05-14)
Malaria runs like clockwork; so does the parasite that causes the disease
A new study uncovers evidence that an intrinsic oscillator drives the blood stage cycle of the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, suggesting parasites have evolved mechanisms to precisely maintain periodicity. (2020-05-14)
Ticking time bomb: Malaria parasite has its own inherent clock
The activity of the parasite that causes malaria is driven by the parasite's own inherent clock, new research led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. (2020-05-14)
A role reversal for the function of certain circadian network neurons
A newly published study in Current Biology reveals surprising findings about the function of circadian network neurons that undergo daily structural change. (2020-05-07)
Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient
By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of 'stress memory' in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding. (2020-05-05)
Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans. (2020-05-05)
Singaporeans suffering from sleep disorders may have help from mechanism regulating biological clock
Recent sleep surveys show that Singaporeans are among the world's most sleep deprived people. (2020-05-04)
Eyes send an unexpected signal to the brain
New research, led by Northwestern University, has found that a subset of retinal neurons sends inhibitory signals to the brain. (2020-04-30)
Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. (2020-04-28)
Long-term use of synthetic corticosteroid drugs increases adrenal gland inflammation
New research by academics at the University of Bristol has found evidence that prolonged treatment of synthetic corticosteroid drugs increases adrenal gland inflammation in response to bacterial infection, an effect that in the long-term can damage adrenal function. (2020-04-27)
New POP atomic clock design achieves state-of-the-art frequency stability
Chinese researchers led by DENG Jianliao from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) have developed a pulsed optically pumped (POP) atomic clock with a frequency stability of 10-15 at 104 seconds based on a new design. (2020-04-21)
Discovery of a drug to rescue winter depression-like behavior
A group of animal biologists and chemists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, has used a chemical genomics approach to explore the underlying mechanism of winter depression-like behavior and identified a drug that rescues winter depression-like behavior in medaka fish. (2020-04-13)
Discovered a small protein that synchronizes the circadian clocks in shoots and roots
In a seminal article published in Cell in 2015, researchers from the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) described that the growing tip of the plant shoot is able to synchronize the daily rhythms of the cells in distal organs. (2020-04-13)
Researchers uncover importance of aligning biological clock with day-night cycles
UC San Diego scientists studying bacteria have identified the roots of a behavior that is regulated by the circadian clock. (2020-04-08)
Do urban fish exhibit impaired sleep?
Melatonin controls the body clock -- high melatonin levels make us feel tired in the evening. (2020-04-03)
Tissue dynamics provide clues to human disease
Scientists in EMBL Barcelona's Ebisuya group, with collaborators from RIKEN, Kyoto University, and Meijo Hospital in Nagoya, Japan, have studied oscillating patterns of gene expression, coordinated across time and space within a tissue grown in vitro, to explore the molecular causes of a rare human hereditary disease known as spondylocostal dysostosis. (2020-04-03)
The discovery of new compounds for acting on the circadian clock
The research team comprised of Designated Associate Professor Tsuyoshi Hirota and Postdoctoral Fellows Simon Miller and Yoshiki Aikawa, of the Nagoya University Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules, has succeeded in the discovery of novel compounds to lengthen the period of the circadian clock, and has shed light on their mechanisms of action. (2020-04-01)
Reconstructing the clock of human development
Researchers used iPS cells to reconstructed the human 'segmentation clock,' a key point in early embryonic development that determines how the body gets segmented. (2020-04-01)
Genetic processes that determine short-sightedness discovered by researchers
Three previously unknown genetic mechanisms have been discovered in causing myopia otherwise known as short or near-sightedness, finds a new study. (2020-03-31)
Machine learning puts a new spin on spin models
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have used machine learning to study spin models, used in physics to study phase transitions. (2020-03-28)
To sleep deeply: The brainstem neurons that regulate non-REM sleep
University of Tsukuba researchers identified neurons that promote non-REM sleep in the brainstem in mice. (2020-03-23)
How does an intersex bee behave?
A group of scientists and students working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Barro Colorado Island studied the circadian rhythm of a bee gynandromorph: a rare condition that results in the expression of both male and female characteristics. (2020-03-18)
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