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Current Civil engineering News and Events

Current Civil engineering News and Events, Civil engineering News Articles.
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Researchers develop new method to rapidly, reliably monitor sickle cell disease
Researchers have developed a rapid and reliable new method to continuously monitor sickle cell disease using a microfluidics-based electrical impedance sensor. (2019-06-13)
Electric vehicles would be a breath of fresh air for Houston
Cornell University researchers are expressing hope for the future of Houston's breathable air, despite the city's poor rankings in the American Lung Association's 2019 'State of the Air' report. (2019-06-11)
Dashing the dream of ideal 'invisibility' cloaks for stress waves
Some have dreamt of the perfect cloak to make buildings impervious to stress waves caused by bombs, earthquakes or other calamities. (2019-06-07)
Intercultural communication crucial for engineering education
In an increasingly connected world it helps to engage with other cultures without prejudice or assumption. (2019-06-06)
The Earth's rotation moves water in Lake Garda
Lake Garda has not yet revealed all of its secrets. (2019-06-05)
Cycling lanes, not cyclists, reduce fatalities for all road users
The most comprehensive study of bicycle and road safety to date finds that building safe facilities for cyclists is one of the biggest factors in road safety for everyone. (2019-05-29)
Outsmarting deep fakes: AI-driven imaging system protects authenticity
To thwart sophisticated deep fake methods of altering photos and video, researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering devised a technique to authenticate images throughout the entire pipeline, from acquisition to delivery, using artificial intelligence (AI). (2019-05-29)
Table scraps can be used to reduce reliance on fossil fuels
Wasted food can be affordably turned into a clean substitute for fossil fuels. (2019-05-23)
Civil War plant medicines blast drug-resistant bacteria in lab tests
A new study based on a mostly forgotten guide to medicinal plants, 'Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests,' focuses on three of the plants and shows they inhibit bacteria associated with wound infections. (2019-05-22)
Algorithm steers catheters to the right spot to treat atrial fibrillation
Some patients with atrial fibrillation or A-Fib need an ablation, which requires a catheter and an advanced 3D map of the heart. (2019-05-21)
Nipple reconstruction techniques could be improved with 3D scaffolds
Nipple and areola reconstruction is a common breast reconstruction technique, especially for breast cancer patients after mastectomy. (2019-05-13)
25 US counties identified as most at risk for measles outbreaks
Twenty-five counties across the country have been identified to be most at risk for a measles outbreak due to low-vaccination rates compounded by a high volume of international travel, according to an analysis by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Johns Hopkins University. (2019-05-13)
Move over, silicon switches: There's a new way to compute
Researchers have introduced a voltage-controlled topological spin switch for logic and memory devices, such as computer hard drives, that now use nanomagnetic mechanisms to store and manipulate information. (2019-05-08)
Road test shows some adaptive cruise control systems can amplify phantom jams
Their work builds on earlier research that showed adding even a small fraction of specially designed autonomous vehicles could eliminate phantom jams by keeping an optimal separation between cars and avoiding sudden stops. (2019-05-08)
Researchers make organic solar cells immune to the ravages of water, air and light
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have devised a way of making organic solar panels robust by performing the molecular equivalent of hair removal by waxing: they used adhesive tape to strip the electron-accepting molecules from the topmost surface of the photoactive layer of the cell. (2019-05-02)
Study suggests earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones
Using data from field experiments and computer modeling of ground faults, researchers at Tufts University have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. (2019-05-02)
Diagnosing urban air pollution exposure with new precision
A new review of studies on levels of urban exposure to airborne pollutants and their effects on human health suggests that advanced instrumentation and information technology will soon allow researchers and policymakers to gauge the health risks of air pollution on an individual level. (2019-05-01)
Making glass more clear
Northwestern University researchers have developed an algorithm that makes it possible to design glassy materials with dynamic properties and predict their continually changing behaviors. (2019-04-30)
Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot
In a new study, Northwestern University researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. (2019-04-18)
Technology automatically senses how Parkinson's patients respond to medication
Adjusting the frequency and dosage of Parkinson's patients' medication is complex. (2019-04-17)
Morphing origami takes a new shape, expanding use possibilities
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created a new type of origami that can morph from one pattern into a different one, or even a hybrid of two patterns, instantly altering many of its structural characteristics. (2019-04-17)
U-M study: 'Induced' driving miles could overwhelm potential energy-saving benefits of self-driving
The benefits of self-driving cars will likely induce vehicle owners to drive more, and those extra miles could partially or completely offset the potential energy-saving benefits that automation may provide, according to a new University of Michigan study. (2019-04-17)
Why researchers are mapping the world's manure
Farmers rely on phosphorus fertilizers to enrich the soil and ensure bountiful harvests, but the world's recoverable reserves of phosphate rocks, from which such fertilizers are produced, are finite and unevenly distributed. (2019-04-17)
'Deep learning' casts wide net for novel 2D materials
Rice University engineers use 'deep learning' techniques to speed up simulations of novel two-dimensional materials to understand their characteristics and how they're affected by high temperature and radiation. (2019-04-10)
Testing how well water disinfectants damage antibiotic resistance genes
A UW team tested how well current water and wastewater disinfecting methods affect antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial DNA. (2019-04-08)
Cold plasma can kill 99.9% of airborne viruses, U-M study shows
Dangerous airborne viruses are rendered harmless on-the-fly when exposed to energetic, charged fragments of air molecules, University of Michigan researchers have shown. (2019-04-08)
Magnetic nanoparticles can 'burn' cancer cells
Among emerging cancer therapies, one approach is based on hyperthermia. (2019-04-04)
Researchers uncover hidden deicer risks affecting bridge health
Common magnesium chloride deicers used on roadways and bridges around the U.S. may be doing more damage than previously thought, researchers have found. (2019-04-04)
Mental health disorders rife in post-conflict areas
A new study has found that 58 percent of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems. (2019-04-01)
New way of designing systems against correlated disruptions uses negative probability
Until now, systems engineers have struggled with the problem of planning for disaster impacts that are linked by correlation -- like those of earthquakes and tsunamis -- because of the cumbersome calculations necessary to precisely quantify the probabilities of all possible combinations of disruption occurrences. (2019-03-28)
Face off -- Cyclists not human enough for drivers: study
A new Australian study has found that more than half of car drivers think cyclists are not completely human, with a link between the dehumanisation of bike riders and acts of deliberate aggression towards them on the road. (2019-03-26)
Study explores why 'progressive teetotalers' may emerge from college engineering programs
First-year engineering students who gravitate toward progressive ideas, including about gender equity in the workplace, tend to drink less alcohol, according to a study by a University of Kansas researcher. (2019-03-25)
Visualizing better cancer treatment
Researchers have engineered nanoscale protein micelles capable of both delivering chemotherapeutic drugs and of being tracked by MRI. (2019-03-20)
EPFL researchers make a key discovery on how alpine streams work
An EPFL study has showed that until now, scientists have been substantially underestimating how quickly gases are exchanged between mountain streams and the atmosphere. (2019-03-18)
Few pathways to an acceptable climate future without immediate action, according to study
A new comprehensive study of climate change has painted over 5 million pictures of humanity's potential future, and few foretell an Earth that has not severely warmed. (2019-03-11)
US black and Hispanic minorities bear disproportionate burden from air pollution
Black and Hispanic Americans bear a disproportionate burden from air pollution caused mainly by non-Hispanic white Americans, according to a study to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-03-11)
Scientists teach machines to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions
Deciding when an athlete can return to the game after a head injury makes managing the treatment of sports-related concussions very complicated. (2019-03-07)
Landscapes of fear, and the large carnivores they feature, important in African ecosystems
A new study focused on Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, where entire populations of large-mammal predators were nearly extinguished during the Mozambican Civil War, illustrates how the loss of an ecosystem's top carnivores can have far-reaching consequences for prey and plant populations, turning 'landscapes of fear' into 'landscapes of fearlessness' in which emboldened herbivores graze and suppress plants. (2019-03-07)
How the global gag rule stifles free speech
A new journal article by researchers in the Global Health Justice and Governance program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health argues that the Expanded Global Gag Rule is having a chilling effect, dampening debate, advocacy, and collaboration around abortion and other sexual and reproductive rights. (2019-03-07)
A 'Post-Antibiotic World?'
The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA. (2019-03-06)
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