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Current Civil engineering News and Events

Current Civil engineering News and Events, Civil engineering News Articles.
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Predicting the impact of climate change on bridge safety
Climate change will increase the frequency and intensity of natural hazards like flooding. (2019-10-09)
Models designed to predict when and how the roads of Bizkaia will deteriorate
A researcher at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering-Bilbao has developed behaviour models of the International Roughness Index (IRI) and the Coefficient of Transverse Friction to predict the future situation of the highway network of Bizkaia. (2019-10-07)
How bike sharing in Seattle rose from the ashes of Pronto's failure
University of Washington transportation researchers looked into why the docked bike-share program Pronto failed while dockless bike sharing has been so successful. (2019-10-07)
New imaging platform examines mechanisms behind coral bleaching
The non-invasive approach developed by Professors Vadim Backman and Luisa Marcelino could help marine biologists monitor coral health in the face of climate change. (2019-10-02)
Engineers produce water-saving crop irrigation sensor
Developed by the team of UConn engineers -- environmental, mechanical, and chemical -- the sensors expected to save nearly 35% of water consumption and cost far less than what exists. (2019-09-26)
Researchers develop thermo-responsive protein hydrogel
Bio-engineering researchers have created a biocompatible, protein-based hydrogel that could serve as a drug delivery system durable enough to survive in the body for more than two weeks while providing sustained medication release. (2019-09-18)
Microbe chews through PFAS and other tough contaminants
In a series of lab tests, a relatively common soil bacterium has demonstrated its ability to break down the difficult-to-remove class of pollutants called PFAS, researchers at Princeton University said. (2019-09-18)
Hyperbolic paraboloid origami harnesses bistability to enable new applications
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Tokyo are looking the 'hypar' origami for ways to leverage its structural properties. (2019-09-17)
Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming
Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife. (2019-09-16)
Study: Americans would rather drive themselves than have an autonomous vehicle drive them
Are you willing to ride in a driverless car? Researchers at the University of Washington studied how Americans' perceived cost of commute time changes depending on who's driving. (2019-09-16)
New method reveals how damage occurs in human biological cells due to mechanical fatigue
Researchers have developed a novel way to measure how mechanical fatigue affects biological cells. (2019-09-16)
Groovy! These grooved patterns better mitigate shock waves
A team of engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. (2019-09-13)
African american bachelor's degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering
African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. (2019-09-12)
Groundwater studies can be tainted by 'survivor bias'
Bad wells tend to get excluded from studies on groundwater levels, a problem that could skew results everywhere monitoring is used to decide government policies and spending. (2019-09-05)
New feedback phenomenon found to drive increasing drought and aridity
A new Columbia Engineering study indicates that the world will experience more frequent and more extreme drought and aridity than currently experienced in the coming century, exacerbated by both climate change and land-atmosphere processes. (2019-09-02)
Researchers use AI to plot green route to nylon
A team at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering reported that in its search to develop an innovative, environmentally friendly process to make adiponitrile (ADN) -- the main precursor to nylon 6, 6 -- it found a way to greatly improve the efficiency of organic electrosynthesis. (2019-08-26)
'100-year' floods will happen every 1 to 30 years, according to new flood maps
Princeton researchers have developed new maps that predict coastal flooding for every county on the Eastern and Gulf Coasts and find 100-year floods could become annual occurrences in New England; and happen every one to 30 years along the southeast Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico shorelines. (2019-08-22)
Study: Climate change could pose danger for Muslim pilgrimage
According to a new study by researchers at MIT and in California, because of climate change there is an increasing risk that in coming years, conditions of heat and humidity in the areas of Saudi Arabia where the Hajj takes place could worsen, to the point that people face 'extreme danger' from harmful health effects. (2019-08-22)
Research using mechanics and physics could predict diseases that 'stress out' cells
Using ultrasonic tweezers, live imaging and a micro-mechanical substrate, NYU Tandon researchers found energy patterns in cellular allostasis that could predict the presence of disease. (2019-08-19)
Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand
Europe has the capacity to produce more than 100 times the amount of energy it currently produces through onshore windfarms, new analysis from the University of Sussex and Aarhus University has revealed. (2019-08-14)
Detention basins could catch more than stormwater
Everywhere you go there are stormwater detention basins built near large construction projects intended to control the flow of rainwater and runoff. (2019-08-12)
Scientists reveal key insights into emerging water purification technology
While it holds promise, membrane distillation doesn't work perfectly. A key challenge is designing membranes to purify water efficiently while ensuring zero contamination of the clean water. (2019-08-07)
Water treatment cuts parasitic roundworm infections affecting 800 million people
A two-year study in rural Kenya explored the effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing and nutritional interventions on rates of intestinal worm and Giardia infections. (2019-08-02)
Music was form of resistance for women during Civil Rights Movement
'Freedom songs' were key in giving motivation and comfort to those fighting for equal rights, in addition to helping empower Black women to lead others when formal leadership positions were unavailable. (2019-08-02)
Shared E-scooters aren't always as green as other transport options
People think of electric scooters, or e-scooters, as environmentally friendly ways to get around town. (2019-08-02)
How roads can help cool sizzling cities
Special permeable concrete pavement can help reduce the 'urban heat island effect' that causes cities to sizzle in the summer, according to a Rutgers-led team of engineers. (2019-08-01)
Energy from seawater
A new battery made from affordable and durable materials generates energy from places where salt and fresh waters mingle. (2019-07-29)
Antibiotic-resistant genes found in London's canals and ponds
Central London's freshwater sources contain high levels of antibiotic-resistant genes, with the River Thames having the highest amount, according to research by UCL. (2019-07-25)
30,000+ US lives could be saved by reducing air pollution levels below current standard
Research findings from the Center for Air Quality, Climate, and Energy Solutions (CACES) at Carnegie Mellon University show significant human health benefits when air quality is better than the current national ambient air quality standard. (2019-07-24)
Researchers suggest new approach needed to address Anthropocene risk
A team of international researchers suggest adopting a holistic approach to understanding environmental risks. (2019-07-22)
Nations with strong women's rights likely to have better population health and faster growth
Nations with strong women's rights are more likely to have better health and faster growth than those who don't promote and protect these values, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-07-18)
$4.6 million award creates program to train cybersecurity professionals
A five-year, $4.63 million award from the National Science Foundation will enable a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Arkansas to create a program to recruit, educate and train the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. (2019-07-16)
Companies' political leanings influence engagement with activists
Liberal-leaning companies are more likely to work in concert with the demands of activists of all kinds than conservative-leaning companies, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Washington. (2019-07-16)
City College-led experts develop flood prediction model
The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. (2019-07-15)
New virus found in one-third of all countries may have coevolved with human lineage
Published in Nature Microbiology, a new study has investigated the origin and evolution of a virus called crAssphage, which may have coevolved with human lineage. (2019-07-11)
UNH research finds thicker pavement is more cost effective down the road
Pavements, which are vulnerable to increased temperatures and excessive flooding due to sea level rise, can crack and crumble. (2019-07-10)
Human waste an asset to economy, environment, study finds
Human waste might be an unpleasant public health burden, but scientists at the University of Illinois see sanitation as a valuable facet of global ecosystems and an overlooked source of nutrients, organic material and water. (2019-07-08)
Surprising NYC ridesharing study findings have implications for policymakers
Researchers have limited access to information about how people use popular ridesharing services like Uber and Lyft. (2019-07-08)
What can trigger violence in postcolonial Africa?
Why do civil wars and coups d'├ętat occur more frequently in some sub-Saharan African countries than others. (2019-06-28)
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Methods used 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research. (2019-06-24)
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