Current Clean water News and Events

Current Clean water News and Events, Clean water News Articles.
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Climate change presents new challenges for the drinking water supply
Rising temperatures in Germany's largest drinking water reservoir present new challenges for the drinking water supply. According to a group of UFZ researchers, the impacts of this increase can be alleviated by mitigating climate change and applying new management strategies. (2020-11-23)

Nature's toolkit for killing viruses and bacteria
Engineers reveal how zinc oxide nanoneedles and droplet hydrodynamics can stop pathogens. (2020-11-23)

Unlocking cheaper chemicals
A new technique to make cheaper more efficient biological enzyme hybrids could have valuable applications in future water recycling, targeted drug manufacturing and other industries, Flinders University green chemistry researchers say in a new publication. The model enzyme system, which immobilises a catalyst enzyme hybrid for continuous flow use in the high-speed vortex fluidic device, showed a 16-fold increase in its efficiency, the researchers say in American Chemical Society journal, ASC Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-11-22)

Highly efficient, long-lasting electrocatalyst to boost hydrogen fuel production
The IBS research team developed a highly efficient and long-lasting electrocatalyst for water oxidation using cobalt, iron, and a minimal amount of ruthenium. (2020-11-20)

Researchers prove water has multiple liquid states
When water reaches approximately -63 degrees centigrade it can separate into two liquid states, with one liquid being 20% more dense than the other. This is a fundamental finding that explains many of the anomalous properties of water at low temperatures. The finding has potential implications in low-temperature chemical and biochemical processes in aqueous environments. (2020-11-19)

Two liquids of water exist
Using x-ray lasers, researchers at Stockholm University have been able to follow the transformation between two distinct different liquid states of water, both being made of H2O molecules. At around -63 Centigrade the two liquids exist at different pressure regimes with a density difference of 20%. By rapidly varying the pressure before the sample could freeze, it was possible to observe one liquid changing into the other in real time. Their findings are published in the journal Science. (2020-11-19)

New technique seamlessly converts ammonia to green hydrogen
Northwestern University researchers have developed a highly effective, environmentally friendly method for converting ammonia into hydrogen. The new technique is a major step forward for enabling a zero-pollution, hydrogen-fueled economy. The idea of using ammonia as a carrier for hydrogen delivery has gained traction in recent years because ammonia is much easier to liquify than hydrogen and is therefore much easier to store and transport. Northwestern's technological breakthrough overcomes several existing barriers to the production of clean hydrogen from ammonia. (2020-11-18)

Gut microbiome manipulation could result from virus discovery
Scientists have discovered how a common virus in the human gut infects and takes over bacterial cells - a finding that could be used to control the composition of the gut microbiome, which is important for human health. The Rutgers co-authored research, which could aid efforts to engineer beneficial bacteria that produce medicines and fuels and clean up pollutants, is published in the journal Nature. (2020-11-18)

'Oasis effect' in urban parks could contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, ASU study finds
Following a year of on-site analyses at a Phoenix-area park, hydrologist Enrique Vivoni of Arizona State University identified that the park showed what meteorologists call the ''oasis effect,'' a microclimate that is cooler than a surrounding dry area due to the evaporation of a water source. (2020-11-18)

Environmental scientists' new ozonation method treats water from antibiotic residues
Clean drinking water is considered to be one of the earth's most precious and threatened resources. Recent studies show that increasing concentrations of pharmaceuticals can be found in surface waters, which can end up in drinking water. TalTech environmental scientists are looking for ways to treat drinking water from hazardous pharmaceutical residues. (2020-11-17)

Holes in Greenland ice sheet are larger than previously thought, study finds
Expedition finds that holes in the Greenland ice sheet, called moulins, are much larger than previously thought. (2020-11-17)

Peel-off coating keeps desalination cleaner and greener
A polyelectrolyte coating enables clean seawater desalination systems without harmful chemicals. (2020-11-16)

Recent climate extremes have driven unprecedented changes in the deep ocean
New measurements reveal a surprising increase in the amount of dense water sinking near Antarctica, following 50 years of decline. (2020-11-16)

US agricultural water use declining for most crops and livestock production
Agricultural production and food manufacturing account for a third of water usage in the U.S. Water use fluctuates with weather patterns but is also affected by shifts in production technology, supply-chain linkages, and domestic and foreign consumer demand. A comprehensive University of Illinois study looked at water withdrawals in U.S. agriculture and food production from 1995 to 2010. The main trend was a decline in water use, driven by a combination of factors. (2020-11-16)

Sensors get a laser shape up
Laser writing breathes life into high-performance sensing platforms. (2020-11-15)

The unique hydraulics in the Barbegal water mills, the world's first industrial plant
The Barbegal watermills in southern France are a unique complex dating back to the 2nd century AD. The construction with 16 waterwheels is, as far as is known, the first attempt in Europe to build a machine complex on an industrial scale. A team of scientists has now gained new knowledge about the construction and principle of the water supply to the mills in Barbegal. (2020-11-13)

Heat and dust help launch Martian water into space, scientists find
Scientists using an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, spacecraft have discovered that water vapor near the surface of the Red Planet is lofted higher into the atmosphere than anyone expected was possible. (2020-11-13)

Possible 1,000-kilometer-long river running deep below Greenland's ice sheet
Computational models suggest that melting water originating in the deep interior of Greenland could flow the entire length of a subglacial valley and exit at Petermann Fjord, along the northern coast of the island. Updating ice sheet models with this open valley could provide additional insight for future climate change predictions. (2020-11-12)

Time for a new state of matter in high-temperature superconductors
Scientists from Universität Hamburg have pointed out how to create a time crystal in an intriguing class of materials, the high-temperature superconductors. They propose to drive these superconducting materials into a time crystalline state by inducing Higgs excitations via light. The work is reported in the journal Physical Review Research. (2020-11-12)

This tableware made from sugarcane and bamboo breaks down in 60 days
Scientists have designed a set of 'green' tableware made from sugarcane and bamboo that doesn't sacrifice on convenience or functionality and could serve as a potential alternative to plastic cups and other disposable plastic containers, which can take as long as 450 years or require high temperatures to degrade. This non-toxic, eco-friendly material only takes 60 days to break down. This plastic alternative is presented November 12, 2020 in the journal Matter. (2020-11-12)

Transport of water to mars' upper atmosphere dominates planet's water loss to space
Instead of its scarce atmospheric water being confined in Mars' lower atmosphere, a new study finds evidence that water on Mars is directly transported to the upper atmosphere, where it is converted to atomic hydrogen that escapes to space. (2020-11-12)

Escape from Mars: how water fled the red planet
Mars once had oceans but is now bone-dry, leaving many to wonder how the water was lost. University of Arizona researchers have discovered a surprisingly large amount of water in the upper atmosphere of Mars, where it is rapidly destroyed, explaining part of this Martian mystery. (2020-11-12)

Modelling microswimmers for drug delivery
An international group of theoretical physicists led by Abdallah Daddi-Moussa-Ider from Düsseldorf, Germany, has modelled the motion of microscopic, motile bodies - either powered micro-machines or living cells - in viscous liquid drops, using the Navier-Stokes equations. This work, which has applications in materials science and medicine, is now published in EPJ E. (2020-11-11)

Researchers present wild theory: Water may be naturally occurring on all rocky planets
Life is deeply dependent on water, but where does water come from? Based on new research, researchers from the University of Copenhagen believe it may emerge in connection with the formation of planets. (2020-11-09)

India's clean fuel transition slowed by belief that firewood is better for well-being
India's transition to clean cooking fuels may be hampered by users' belief that using firewood is better for their families' wellbeing than switching to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), a new study reveals. (2020-11-09)

A biomimetic membrane for desalinating seawater on an industrial scale
Reverse osmosis is one of the most widely used techniques for the desalination of water. Some of the membranes currently used are artificial channels of water inserted into lipid layers. But their large-scale performance is not satisfactory. An international team has developed a hybrid strategy, which consists of combining a polyamide matrix and artificial water channels into a single structure. Their membranes have been tested under industrial conditions and outperform conventional membranes. (2020-11-09)

Mystery of glacial lake floods solved
A long-standing mystery in the study of glaciers was recently and serendipitously solved by a team led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. A trigger was identified for some of the largest floods on Earth--those emerging suddenly and unpredictably from beneath glaciers or ice caps. (2020-11-06)

The dangers of collecting drinking water
Fetching drinking water in low and middle income countries can cause serious injury, particularly for women. A new international study published in BMJ Global Health reveals dangers including falls, traffic accidents, animal attacks, and fights, which can result in broken bones, spinal injuries, lacerations, and other physical injuries. The work draws on a survey of 6,291 randomly selected households across 24 sites in 21 low- and middle-income countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. (2020-11-04)

Water-energy nanogrid provides solution for rural communities lacking basic amenities
Researchers at Texas A&M University have come up with an economical, green solution that can help underprivileged communities with their water and electricity needs. (2020-11-04)

Brain region tracking food preferences could steer our food choices
Researchers discovered that a specific brain region monitors food preferences as they change across thirsty and quenched states. By targeting neurons in that part of the brain, they were able to shift food choice preferences from a more desired reward (think: chocolate cake) to a less tasty one (think: stale bread). (2020-11-04)

New protein nanobioreactor designed to improve sustainable bioenergy production
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have unlocked new possibilities for the future development of sustainable, clean bioenergy. The study, published in Nature Communications, shows how bacterial protein 'cages' can be reprogrammed as nanoscale bioreactors for hydrogen production. (2020-11-03)

Self-watering soil could transform farming
A new type of soil created by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin can pull water from the air and distribute it to plants, potentially expanding the map of farmable land around the globe to previously inhospitable places and reducing water use in agriculture at a time of growing droughts. (2020-11-02)

Researchers devise new method to get the lead out
Researchers in the lab of Daniel Giammar, in McKelvey School of Engineering have devised a simple, quick and inexpensive way to quantify how much lead is trapped by a water filter. (2020-10-30)

Washing hands and Halloween candy can mitigate COVID-19 contamination risks
New research shows that COVID-19 exposure risk from contaminated candy could be successfully mitigated both by washing hands and washing candy using a simple at-home method. A team of researchers published this work today in mSystems, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-10-30)

Scientists discover new structures in the smallest ice cube
A research team led by Prof. JIANG Ling and Prof. YANG Xueming from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. LI Jun from Tsinghua University, revealed the coexistence of five cubic isomers in the smallest ice cube, including two with chirality. (2020-10-29)

Chemical scissors snip 2D transition metal dichalcogenides into nanoribbon
One of the biggest challenges in making hydrogen production clean and cheap has been finding an alternative catalyst necessary for the chemical reaction that produces the gas, one that is much cheaper and abundant than the very expensive and rare platinum that is currently used. Researchers in Korea have now found a way to 'snip' into tiny nanoribbons a cheap and plentiful substance that fits the bill, boosting its catalytic efficiency to at least that of platinum. (2020-10-29)

Probing water for an electrifying cause
An experiment, elegant in its simplicity, helps explain why water becomes electrified when it touches hydrophobic surfaces. (2020-10-29)

CAM modes provide environment-specific water-saving benefits in a leaf metabolic model
Several plant lineages living in arid environments have evolved crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis, a water-saving mode of carbon fixation in which CO2 uptake and CO2 fixation are temporally separated. Researchers from IPK Gatersleben and the University of Oxford tested whether full CAM is also necessarily the best solution for C3 crops grown in temperate environments and attempted to identify alternative metabolic modes that best balance the trade-off between water loss and photosynthetic productivity under a range of environments. (2020-10-29)

Identifying biomolecule fragments in ionising radiation
In a new study published in EPJ D, researchers define for the first time the precise exact ranges in which positively and negatively charged fragments can be produced when living cells are bombarded with fast, heavy ions. (2020-10-29)

Water fleas on 'happy pills' have more offspring
Dopamine can trigger feelings of happiness in humans. Water fleas that are exposed to dopamine-regulating substances apparently gain several advantages. (2020-10-29)

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