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Current Climate change News and Events

Current Climate change News and Events, Climate change News Articles.
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Uganda: 20% decline in economic output without climate action
Less nutrition, less productivity, less development: the changing climate hinders poor rural areas of developing countries. (2020-04-08)
Carbon emission scheme 'succeeding despite low prices'
A European Union (EU) programme aimed at reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions has made significant progress despite low prices in carbon markets, according to a study at the Universities of Strathclyde and Pittsburgh. (2020-04-08)
New NUI Galway study helps improve accuracy of future climate change predictions
New research published by NUI Galway's Centre for Climate & Air Pollution Studies (C-CAPS) has shone light on the impact of clouds on climate change. (2020-04-08)
A new method for correcting systematic errors in ocean subsurface data
During almost four decades between 1940-1970s the majority of temperature observations in the ocean within the upper 200 meters was obtained by means of mechanical bathythermographs (MBT). (2020-04-08)
Climate change could cause sudden biodiversity losses worldwide
A warming global climate could cause sudden, potentially catastrophic losses of biodiversity in regions across the globe throughout the 21st century, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature. (2020-04-08)
Don't look to mature forests to soak up carbon dioxide emissions
Research published today in Nature suggests mature forests are limited in their ability to absorb 'extra' carbon as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase. (2020-04-08)
Climate change to affect fish sizes and complex food webs
Global climate change will affect fish sizes in unpredictable ways and, consequently, impact complex food webs in our oceans, a new IMAS-led study has shown. (2020-04-06)
The ocean responds to a warming planet
The oceans help buffer the Earth from climate change by absorbing carbon dioxide and heat at the surface and transporting it to the deep ocean. (2020-04-06)
Societal transformations and resilience in Arabia across 12,000 years of climate change
Recent archaeological and paleoenvironmental research in the Arabian Peninsula shows a range of societal responses to a series of extreme climatic and environmental fluctuations over thousands of years. (2020-04-06)
Indigenous knowledge could reveal ways to weather climate change on islands
Some islands have such low elevation, that mere inches of sea-level rise will flood them, but higher, larger islands will also be affected by changes in climate and an understanding of ancient practices in times of climate change might help populations survive, according to researchers. (2020-04-06)
The ocean's 'biological pump' captures more carbon than expected
Scientists have long known that the ocean plays an essential role in capturing carbon from the atmosphere, but a new study from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that the efficiency of the ocean's 'biological carbon pump' has been drastically underestimated, with implications for future climate assessments. (2020-04-06)
Climate change encouraged colonisation of South Pacific Islands earlier than first thought
Research led by scientists at the University of Southampton has found settlers arrived in East Polynesia around 200 years earlier than previously thought. (2020-04-06)
Warming-induced greening slows warming at third pole
The Third Pole has seen an increase in vegetation over the past three decades. (2020-04-06)
Changes to drylands with future climate change
While drylands around the world will expand at an accelerated rate because of future climate change, their average productivity will likely be reduced, according to a new study. (2020-04-03)
Northern peatlands will lose some of their CO2 sink capacity under a warmer climate
A Nordic study sheds new light on the role of northern peatlands in regulating the regional climate. (2020-04-03)
Climate-related disasters increase risks of conflict in vulnerable countries
Research on the effects of climate change on armed violence have previously been open to interpretation but new study shows climate-related disasters enhance armed conflict risks. (2020-04-02)
Climate disasters increase risks of armed conflicts: New evidence
The risk for violent clashes increases after weather extremes such as droughts or floods hit people in vulnerable countries, an international team of scientists finds. (2020-04-02)
New energy strategy in Cameroon to help avert 28,000 deaths and reduce global temperatures
A new study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, has found that clean cooking with liquified petroleum gas (LPG) could avert 28,000 premature deaths and reduce global temperatures through successful implementation of a new national household energy strategy in Cameroon. (2020-04-02)
Study synthesizes what climate change means for Northwest wildfires
A synthesis study looks at how climate change will affect the risk of wildfires in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and western Montana. (2020-04-02)
Tiny tech for accelerating transformation to low-carbon energy
In a Policy Forum, Charlie Wilson and colleagues explore the potential advantages of 'granular' energy technologies -- small-scale, lower-cost and modular technologies -- for accelerating the low-carbon transformation of our global energy system. (2020-04-02)
Smaller scale solutions needed for rapid progress towards emissions targets
Low-carbon technologies that are smaller scale, more affordable, and can be mass deployed are more likely to enable a faster transition to net-zero emissions, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. (2020-04-02)
Climate change may be making migration harder by shortening nightingales' wings
The Common Nightingale, known for its beautiful song, breeds in Europe and parts of Asia and migrates to sub-Saharan Africa every winter. (2020-04-01)
A sensational discovery: Traces of rainforests in West Antarctica
An international team of researchers led by geoscientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now provided a new and unprecedented perspective on the climate history of Antarctica. (2020-04-01)
Landmark study concludes marine life can be rebuilt by 2050
An international study recently published in the journal Nature that was led by KAUST professors Carlos Duarte and Susana Agustí lays out the essential roadmap of actions required for the planet's marine life to recover to full abundance by 2050. (2020-04-01)
Uncertain climate future could disrupt energy systems
An international team of scientists has published a new study proposing an optimization methodology for designing climate-resilient energy systems and to help ensure that communities will be able to meet future energy needs given weather and climate variability. (2020-04-01)
Almond orchard recycling a climate-smart strategy
Recycling orchard trees onsite can sequester carbon, save water and increase crop yields, making it a climate-smart practice for California's irrigated almond orchards, finds a study from the University of California, Davis. (2020-04-01)
Study offers new insight into the impact of ancient migrations on the European landscape
Scientists from the University of Plymouth and the University of Copenhagen led research tracing how the two major human migrations recorded in Holocene Europe -- the northwestward movement of Anatolian farmer populations during the Neolithic and the westward movement of Yamnaya steppe peoples during the Bronze Age -- unfolded. (2020-04-01)
Study shows six decades of change in plankton communities
New research published in Global Change Biology shows that some species have experienced a 75% population decrease in the past 60 years, while others are more than twice as abundant due to rises in sea surface temperatures. (2020-04-01)
Stanford researchers forecast longer, more extreme wildfire seasons
Stanford-led study finds that autumn days with extreme fire weather have more than doubled in California since the early 1980s due to climate change. (2020-04-01)
Our oceans are suffering, but we can rebuild marine life
It's not too late to rescue global marine life, according to a study outlining the steps needed for marine ecosystems to recover from damage by 2050. (2020-04-01)
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to nine million-year-old rocks in Gansu Province in western China. (2020-04-01)
Ocean deoxygenation: A silent driver of coral reef demise?
Authors of a new study published in Nature Climate Change say the threat of ocean deoxygenation has largely been ignored and asks the question: 'Are our coastal coral reefs slowly suffocating?' (2020-03-31)
Changing forests
As the climate is changing, so too are the world's forests. (2020-03-30)
Experts call for health and climate change warning labels on petrol pumps
Warning labels should be displayed on petrol pumps, energy bills, and airline tickets to encourage consumers to question their own use of fossil fuels, say health experts in The BMJ today. (2020-03-30)
Under extreme heat and drought, trees hardly benefit from an increased CO2 level
The increase in the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere does not compensate the negative effect of greenhouse gas-induced climate change on trees: The more extreme drought and heat become, the less do trees profit from the increased supply with carbon dioxide in terms of carbon metabolism and water use efficiency. (2020-03-26)
As the ocean warms, marine species relocate toward the poles
Since pre-industrial times, the world's oceans have warmed by an average of one degree Celsius (1°C). (2020-03-26)
Global study shows how marine species respond as oceans warm
A global analysis of over 300 marine species spanning more than 100 years, shows that mammals, plankton, fish, plants and seabirds have been changing in abundance as our climate warms. (2020-03-26)
Less ice, more methane from northern lakes: A result from global warming
Shorter and warmer winters lead to an increase in emissions of methane from northern lakes, according to a new study by scientists in Finland and the US. (2020-03-26)
The Caucasus without a cap
Global warming has caused the total area of more than 600 Greater Caucasus glaciers to drop by approximately 16%, according to an international research team that includes Stanislav Kutuzov, geographer from HSE University. (2020-03-26)
New sediment record reveals instability of North Atlantic deep ocean circulation
In the future's warmer climate, large, abrupt and frequent changes in ocean ventilation may be more likely than currently assumed, according to a new study. (2020-03-26)
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