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Current Climate change News and Events

Current Climate change News and Events, Climate change News Articles.
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Nanodiamonds as photocatalysts
Diamond nanomaterials are considered hot candidates for low-cost photocatalysts. They can be activated by light and can then accelerate certain reactions between water and CO2 and produce carbon-neutral 'solar fuels'. (2018-10-18)
UNH researchers say winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that the swell of infestations of winter ticks -- which attach themselves to moose during the fall and feed throughout the winter -- is the primary cause of an unprecedented 70 percent death rate of calves over a three-year period. (2018-10-17)
Penetrating the soil's surface with radar
Ground penetrating radar measures the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily. (2018-10-17)
Dry conditions in East Africa half a million years ago possibly shaped human evolution, study finds
Samples of ancient sediments from a lake basin in East Africa have revealed that arid conditions developed in the area around half a million years ago, an environmental change that could have played a major role in human evolution and influenced advances in stone technology, according to an international research team that includes geologists from Georgia State University. (2018-10-17)
Study: US tornado frequency shifting eastward from Great Plains
A new study finds that over the past four decades, tornado frequency has increased over a large swath of the Midwest and Southeast and decreased in portions of the central and southern Great Plains, a region traditionally associated with Tornado Alley. (2018-10-17)
Climate stress will make cities more vulnerable
The fall of Angkor has long puzzled historians, archaeologists and scientists, but now a University of Sydney research team is one step closer to discovering what led to the city's demise -- and it comes with a warning for modern urban communities. (2018-10-17)
Climate models fail to simulate recent air-pressure changes over Greenland
Climatologists may be unable to accurately predict regional climate change over the North Atlantic because computer simulations have failed to include real data from the Greenland region over the last three decades -- and it could lead to regional climate predictions for the UK and parts of Europe being inaccurate. (2018-10-16)
Climate changes require better adaptation to drought
Europe's future climate will be characterised by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. (2018-10-16)
Can forests save us from climate change?
Additional climate benefits through sustainable forest management will be modest and local rather than global. (2018-10-16)
Forest carbon stocks have been overestimated for 50 years
A formula used to calculate basic wood density has recently been corrected. (2018-10-16)
Syracuse geologists contribute to new understanding of Mekong River incision
An international team of earth scientists has linked the establishment of the Mekong River to a period of major intensification of the Asian monsoon during the middle Miocene, about 17 million years ago, findings that supplant the assumption that the river incised in response to tectonic causes. (2018-10-16)
Study reveals how climate change could cause global beer shortages
Severe climate events could cause shortages in the global beer supply, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia. (2018-10-15)
Global warming will have us crying in what's left of our beer
In a study published today in Nature Plants, researchers from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions report that concurrent droughts and heat waves, exacerbated by anthropogenic global warming, will lead to sharp declines in crop yields of barley, beer's main ingredient. (2018-10-15)
Tracking the movement of the tropics 800 years into the past
For the first time, scientists have traced the north-south shifts of the northern-most edge of the tropics back 800 years. (2018-10-15)
New interactive scenario explorer for 1.5 degrees C pathways
IIASA and the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC) have made the scenarios underlying last week's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1.5 degrees C Special Report publicly available, in an interactive online resource. (2018-10-15)
Two degrees decimated Puerto Rico's insect populations
While temperatures in the tropical forests of northeastern Puerto Rico have climbed two degrees Celsius since the mid-1970s, the biomass of arthropods - invertebrate animals such as insects, millipedes, and sowbugs - has declined by as much as 60-fold, according to new findings published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. (2018-10-15)
Does climate vary more from century to century when it is warmer?
Century-scale climate variability was enhanced when the Earth was warmer during the Last Interglacial period (129,000-116,000 years ago) compared to the current interglacial (the last 11,700 years), according to a new UCL-led study. (2018-10-12)
Geoengineering, other technologies won't solve climate woes
The IPCC report released in early October underscored the need to act quickly to cut greenhouse gas emissions before the planet's temperatures rise to an unacceptable level. (2018-10-11)
Role of 'natural factors' on recent climate change underestimated, research shows
Pioneering new research has given a new perspective on the crucial role that 'natural factors' play in global warming. (2018-10-10)
New study helps explain recent scarcity of Bay nettles
A new, long-term study of how environmental conditions affect the abundance and distribution of jellyfish in the nation's largest estuary helps explain the widely reported scarcity of sea nettles within Chesapeake Bay during the past few months and raises concerns about how a long-term continuation of this trend might harm Bay fisheries as climate continues to warm. (2018-10-10)
HKBU scholar discovers strong evidence for links between drying climate and human evolution
Professor Richard Bernhart Owen of the HKBU Department of Geography has analysed African lake sedimentary cores and established connections between a drying climate and technological and evolutionary changes in early humans. (2018-10-09)
'Sentinels of the sea' at risk from changing climate
Climate change's effect on coastal ecosystems is very likely to increase mortality risks of adult oyster populations in the next 20 years. (2018-10-09)
IIASA contributes to IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees C
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has published its Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees C, a new assessment on minimizing global warming, and multiple IIASA researchers were involved in its production. (2018-10-09)
Rapid, widespread changes may be coming to Antarctica's Dry Valleys, study finds
Antarctica's sandy polar desert, the McMurdo Dry Valleys, has undergone changes over the past decade and the recent discovery of thawing permafrost, thinning glaciers and melting ground ice by a Portland State University-led research team are signs that rapid and widespread change could be on the horizon. (2018-10-09)
Maximizing the carbon and biodiversity benefits of restoration along rivers and streams
Restoring forests has become a world-wide strategy for simultaneously addressing the challenges of climate change and biodiversity conservation. (2018-10-09)
Confronting climate change in the age of denial: a special collection launched in PLOS Biology
People are hard-wired to respond to stories, but climate-denial narratives can be just as compelling as those that convey the facts about global warming. (2018-10-09)
Lessons from the 1918 flu pandemic, 100 years on
With flu season nearly upon us, a new study looks at the factors behind the extremely high mortality of the 1918 flu pandemic and how to prepare for future outbreaks. (2018-10-08)
Dryer, less predictable environment may have spurred human evolution
Evidence of a variable but progressively drying climate coincides with a major shift in stone-tool-making abilities and the appearance of modern Homo sapiens. (2018-10-08)
Improving paleotemperature reconstruction: Swiss lakes as a model system
For years, scientists have been trying to determine the climate of the past in order to make better predictions about future climate conditions. (2018-10-08)
Alaskan carbon assessment has implications for national climate policy
A collection of articles in Ecological Applications provides a synthesis of the Alaska terrestrial and aquatic carbon cycle. (2018-10-05)
Primary tropical forests are best but regrowing forests are also vital to biodiversity
Even after 40 years of recovery, secondary forests remain species and carbon-poor compared to undisturbed primary forests, a new study reveals. (2018-10-04)
Climate change efforts should focus on ocean-based solutions
The first broad-scale assessment of ocean-based measures to reduce atmospheric CO2, counteract ocean warming and/or reduce ocean acidification and sea-level rise shows their high potential to mitigate climate change and its impacts. (2018-10-04)
Thirteen ocean solutions for climate change
Over a dozen international researchers from the Ocean Solutions Initiative -- including scientists from the CNRS, IDDRI, and Sorbonne University -- have evaluated the potential of 13 ocean-based measures to counter climate change. (2018-10-04)
More wet and dry weather extremes projected with global warming
Global warming is projected to spawn more extreme wet and dry weather around the world, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2018-10-04)
Large-scale US wind power would cause warming that would take roughly a century to offset
Extracting energy from the wind causes climatic impacts that are small compared to current projections of 21st century warming, but large compared to the effect of reducing US electricity emissions to zero with solar. (2018-10-04)
Large-scale wind power needs more land, causes more climatic impact than previously thought
In two papers, Harvard University researchers find that the transition to wind or solar power in the United States would require five to 20 times more land area than previously thought, and if such large-scale wind farms were built, would warm average surface temperatures over the continental United States by 0.24 degrees Celsius. (2018-10-04)
Cooling effect of preindustrial fires on climate underestimated
A new study, ;Reassessment of Pre-Industrial Fire Emissions Strongly Affects Anthropogenic Aerosol Forcing,' by a Cornell University postdoctoral researcher, published in Nature Communications, finds that emissions from fire activity were significantly greater in the preindustrial era, which began around 1750, than previously thought. (2018-10-03)
Warmer springs can reduce summer plant productivity
A new extensive study on the effects of warmer springs on plant growth in northern regions shows substantially reduced plant productivity in later months. (2018-10-03)
A warmer spring leads to less plant growth in summer
Due to climate change, springtime growth begins earlier each year. (2018-10-03)
Global warming increases wildfire potential damages in Mediterranean Europe
A study published in Nature Communications, led by researchers of the University of Barcelona in collaboration with other research institutions, shows that anthropogenic warming will increase the burned areas due fires in Mediterranean Europe, and the increase of the burned area could be reduced by limiting global warming to 1.5 ºC. (2018-10-02)
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