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Current Climate models News and Events

Current Climate models News and Events, Climate models News Articles.
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Climate change projected to increase seasonal East African rainfall
According to research led by The University of Texas at Austin, seasonal rainfall is expected to rise significantly in East Africa over the next few decades in response to increased greenhouse gases. (2020-08-11)
How fish stocks will change in warming seas
New research out today highlights the future effects of climate change on important fish stocks for south-west UK fisheries. (2020-08-10)
New tools in the fight against lethal citrus disease
Scientists are closer to gaining the upper hand on Huanglongbing, a disease that has wiped out citrus orchards across the globe. (2020-08-10)
Personal connections key to climate adaptation
Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods. (2020-08-10)
Past evidence supports complete loss of Arctic sea-ice by 2035
A new study, published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, supports predictions that the Arctic could be free of sea ice by 2035. (2020-08-10)
Landmarks facing climate threats could 'transform,' expert says
Researchers asked in a viewpoint published in Climatic Change whether heritage sites threatened by climate change should be allowed to adapt and 'transform.' (2020-08-10)
Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, PSU study finds
A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates. (2020-08-10)
New Zealand's Southern Alps glacier melt has doubled
Glaciers in the Southern Alps of New Zealand have lost more ice mass since pre-industrial times than remains today, according to a new study led by the University of Leeds. (2020-08-07)
Florida current is weaker now than at any point in the past century
A key component of the Gulf Stream has markedly slowed over the past century--that's the conclusion of a new research paper in Nature Communications published on August 7, 2020. (2020-08-07)
Skoltech supercomputer helps scientists reveal most influential parameters for crop
Skoltech researchers have used the supercomputer to perform a very precise sensitivity analysis to reveal crucial parameters for different crop yields in the chernozem region of Russia, famous for its high-quality, fertile soil. (2020-08-07)
Predicting drought in the American West just got more difficult
A new, USC-led study of more than 1,000 years of North American droughts and global conditions found that forecasting a lack of precipitation is rarely straightforward. (2020-08-07)
Impact of climate change on tropical fisheries would create ripples across the world
Seafood is the most highly traded food commodity globally, with tropical zone marine fisheries contributing more than 50% of the global fish catch, an average of $USD 96 billion annually. (2020-08-06)
Flexible management of hydropower plants would contribute to a secure electricity supply
UPV/EHU and BC3 researchers have analyzed the expected evolution of power supply and demand over the coming decades in Spain; they consider a future without nuclear and coal-based plants but with a greater share of renewable sources. (2020-08-06)
'Roaming reactions' study to shed new light on atmospheric molecules
For the first time, a team of chemists has lifted the hood on the mechanics involved in the mysterious interplay between sunlight and molecules in the atmosphere known as 'roaming reactions', which could make atmospheric modelling more accurate. (2020-08-06)
Carbon footprinting and pricing under climate concerns
Marketers can lead how their companies can use the cost and demand effects of reducing the carbon footprint of their products to determine the profit-maximizing design. (2020-08-05)
Rock debris protects glaciers from climate change more than previously known
A new study which provides a global estimate of rock cover on the Earth's glaciers has revealed that the expanse of rock debris on glaciers, a factor that has been ignored in models of glacier melt and sea level rise, could be significant. (2020-08-05)
Climate change may melt the "freezers" of pygmy owls and reduce their overwinter survival
Ecologists at the University of Turku, Finland, have discovered that the food hoards pygmy owls collect in nest-boxes (''freezers'') for winter rot due to high precipitation caused by heavy autumn rains and if the hoarding has been initiated early in the autumn. (2020-08-05)
How climate change affects allergies, immune response and autism
Climate change and disruption of the ecosystem have the potential to profoundly impact the human body. (2020-08-05)
Photoperiod and temperature prove secondary growth resumption in northern hemisphere conifers
Ecologists from the South China Botanical Garden of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have identified multiple exogenous factors that can affect the onset of wood formation and quantified the key drivers for secondary growth resumption in Northern Hemisphere conifers. (2020-08-04)
How the seafloor of the Antarctic Ocean is changing - and the climate is following suit
Experts have reconstructed the depth of the Southern Ocean at key phases in the last 34 million years of the Antarctic's climate history (2020-08-04)
Tracking and forecasting outbreak risk of dengue, Zika and other Aedes-transmitted diseases
New system infuses 'R0' models with climate information to help public health agencies forecast places and times when environmental conditions might enhance transmission of dengue, Zika and other Aedes-borne diseases (2020-08-04)
In a warming world, New England's trees are storing more carbon
The study reveals that the rate at which carbon is captured from the atmosphere at Harvard Forest nearly doubled between 1992 and 2015. (2020-08-04)
NASA's cloudsat takes a slice from tropical storm Isaias 
NASA's CloudSat passed over Tropical Storm Isaias as it was strengthening back into a hurricane on Aug. (2020-08-04)
Changes in land evaporation shape the climate
An international team of Hungarian, American and Chinese scientists have demonstrated that an existing calibration-free version of the CR method that inherently tracks the aridity changes of the environment in each step of the calculations can better detect long-term trends in continental-scale land evaporation rates than a recently developed and globally calibrated one without such dynamic adjustments to aridity. (2020-08-04)
How to predict a typhoon
An international team of researchers has developed a model that analyzes nearly a quarter of Earth's surface and atmosphere in order to better predict the conditions that birth typhoons, as well as the conditions that lead to more severe storms. (2020-08-04)
'Worst-case' CO2 emissions scenario is best for assessing climate risk and impacts to 2050
The RCP 8.5 carbon emissions pathway is the most appropriate for conducting assessments of climate change impacts by 2050, according to a new article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-08-03)
Scientists reveal roles of wind stress and subsurface cold water in the second-year cooling of the 2017/18 La Niña event
Scientists diagnose the atmospheric and oceanic factors that could have been responsible for the second-year cooling in the 2017/18 La Niña event. (2020-08-03)
How to improve climate modeling and prediction
Mathematicians propose ideas that make it possible to perform much more effective climate simulations than the traditional approach allows. (2020-07-31)
Texas cave sediment upends meteorite explanation for global cooling
Texas researchers from the University of Houston, Baylor University and Texas A&M University have discovered evidence for why the earth cooled dramatically 13,000 years ago, dropping temperatures by about 3 degrees Centigrade. (2020-07-31)
Increasing Arctic freshwater is driven by climate change
New, first-of-its-kind research from the University of Colorado Boulder shows that climate change is driving increasing amounts of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean. (2020-07-30)
Coastal flooding set to get more frequent, threatening coastal life and global GDP
Coastal flooding across the world is set to rise by around 50 per cent due to climate change in the next 80 years, endangering millions more people and trillions of US dollars more of coastal infrastructure, new research shows. (2020-07-30)
Tierra del Fuego: marine ecosystems from 6,000 to 5000 years ago
Global warming will modify the distribution and abundance of fish worldwide, with effects on the structure and dynamics of food networks. (2020-07-30)
North Atlantic climate far more predictable following major scientific breakthrough
North Atlantic atmospheric pressure patterns, the key driving force behind winter weather in Europe and eastern North America, are highly predictable, enabling advanced warning of whether winters in the coming decade are likely to be stormy, warm and wet or calm, cold and dry. (2020-07-30)
COVID-19 provides rare opportunities for studying natural and human systems
Researchers at Stanford and other institutions hypothesize outcomes of the pandemic's unprecedented socioeconomic disruption and outline research priorities for advancing our understanding of humans' impact on the environment Watch related video: https://youtu.be/jd9Jb6OInlM (2020-07-29)
Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture
A new USDA report focuses on how agricultural systems are impacted by climate change and offers a list of 20 indicators that provide a broad look at what's happening across the country. (2020-07-29)
New scenario for the India-Asia collision dynamics
The India-Asia collision is an outstanding smoking gun in the study of continental collision dynamics. (2020-07-28)
Shrinking dwarves
The biomass of small animals that decompose plants in the soil and thus maintain its fertility is declining both as a result of climate change and over-intensive cultivation. (2020-07-28)
New soil models may ease atmospheric CO2, climate change
To remove carbon dioxide from the Earth's atmosphere in an effort to slow climate change, scientists must get their hands dirty and peek underground. (2020-07-28)
How Salt Lake's buildings affect its climate future
With climate change, we'll need less natural gas for heat and more electricity for cooling -- but what's the balance ? (2020-07-28)
How climate change impacts prescribed burning days
Climate change in eastern Australia will shift when hazard reduction burning occurs but for most areas the number of suitable days remains unchanged. (2020-07-28)
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