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Current Climate News and Events

Current Climate News and Events, Climate News Articles.
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Future rainfall could far outweigh current climate predictions
Scientists from the University of Plymouth analysed rainfall records from the 1870s to the present day with their findings showing there could be large divergence in projected rainfall by the mid to late 21st century. (2019-11-14)
Climate change expected to shift location of East Asian Monsoons
More than a billion people in Asia depend on seasonal monsoons for their water needs. (2019-11-13)
Climate impact of hydropower varies widely
Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. (2019-11-13)
Climate change influenced rise and fall of Northern Iraq's Neo-Assyrian Empire
Changes in climate may have contributed to both the rise and collapse of the Neo-Assyrian Empire in northern Iraq, which was considered the most powerful empire of its time, according to a new study. (2019-11-13)
When reporting climate-driven human migration, place matters
Location matters when talking about how climate might or might not be driving migration from Central America. (2019-11-13)
Harvard study shows where global renewable energy investments have greatest benefits
New study finds that the amount of climate and health benefits achieved from renewable energy depends on the country where it is installed. (2019-11-12)
Maritime continent weakens Asian Tropical Monsoon rainfall through Australian cross-equatorial flows
A new study reveals how maritime continent weakens Asian tropical monsoon rainfall through Australian Cross-equatorial Flows. (2019-11-12)
Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up
As bacteria adapt to hotter temperatures, they speed up their respiration rate and release more carbon, potentially accelerating climate change. (2019-11-12)
What future do emperor penguins face?
Emperor penguins establish their colonies on sea ice under extremely specific conditions. (2019-11-12)
Individual climate models may not provide the complete picture
Equilibrium climate sensitivity -- how sensitive the Earth's climate is to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide -- may be underestimated in individual climate models, according to a team of climate scientists. (2019-11-12)
Government should address climate change, health and taxes as one issue
Protecting our climate will protect health, and implementing evidence-based policies that consider action to meet targets on global warming, the economy, taxes and health together should be a priority for Canada's government, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-11-11)
Rising grain prices in response to phased climatic change during 1736-1850 in the North China Plain
The links between climatic change and grain price anomalies in the North China Plain (NCP) during the Qing Dynasty were analyzed. (2019-11-11)
Finding common ground for scientists and policymakers on soil carbon and climate change
In an opinion published in Nature Sustainability, a group of scientists argue that public debate about the role of soil carbon in battling climate change is undermining the potential for policymakers to implement policies that build soil carbon for other environmental and agricultural benefits. (2019-11-11)
Hurricanes have become bigger and more destructive for USA; new study from the Niels Bohr Institute
A new study by researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Aslak Grinsted, Peter Ditlevsen and Jens Hesselbjerg shows that hurricanes have become more destructive since 1900, and the worst of them are more than 3 times as frequent now than 100 years ago. (2019-11-11)
Forecasting dengue: Challenges and a way forward
International collaboration is finding new ways to improve how scientists develop and test models to forecast dengue infection. (2019-11-11)
Arctic shifts to a carbon source due to winter soil emissions
A NASA-funded study suggests winter carbon emissions in the Arctic may be adding more carbon into the atmosphere each year than is taken up by Arctic vegetation, marking a stark reversal for a region that has captured and stored carbon for tens of thousands of years. (2019-11-08)
Unless warming is slowed, emperor penguins will be marching towards extinction
Emperor penguins are some of the most striking and charismatic animals on Earth, but a new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that a warming climate may render them extinct by the end of this century. (2019-11-07)
Aviation emissions' impacts on air quality larger than on climate, study finds
New research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has quantified the climate and air quality impacts of aviation, broken down by emission type, altitude and location. (2019-11-07)
Mobile phone data reveals non-market value of coastal tourism under climate change
Big data application is an emerging field in climate change adaptation. (2019-11-06)
Declaration of a climate emergency and next steps for action
Scientific consensus concerning climate change is well established, but action has been slow to follow. (2019-11-05)
Changes in high-altitude winds over the South Pacific produce long-term effects
In the past million years, the high-altitude winds of the southern westerly wind belt, which spans nearly half the globe, didn't behave as uniformly over the Southern Pacific as previously assumed. (2019-11-05)
Does climate change affect real estate prices? Only if you believe in it
A new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business shows that at-risk homes sell for more in areas where people don't believe in climate change. (2019-11-05)
Wild animals evolving to give birth earlier in warming climate
Red deer on a Scottish island are providing scientists with some of the first evidence that wild animals are evolving to give birth earlier in the year as the climate warms. (2019-11-05)
Conservatives more likely to support climate policy if they report harm due to extreme weather
People who identify as politically conservative are more like to support climate change mitigation policies if they have report experiencing personal harm from an extreme weather event such as a wildfire, flood or tornado, a new study indicates. (2019-11-05)
Just 15 years of post-Paris emissions to lock in 20 cm of sea level rise in 2300: study
Unless governments significantly scale up their emission reduction efforts, the 15 years' worth of emissions released under their current Paris Agreement pledges alone would cause 20 cm of sea-level rise over the longer term, according to new research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at Climate Analytics and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). (2019-11-04)
Sea levels to continue rising after Paris agreement emission pledges expire in 2030
Sea levels will continue to rise around the world long after current carbon emissions pledges made through the Paris climate agreement are met and global temperatures stabilize, a new study indicates. (2019-11-04)
Satellites are key to monitoring ocean carbon
Satellites now play a key role in monitoring carbon levels in the oceans, but we are only just beginning to understand their full potential. (2019-11-03)
Climate engineering should not be considered a public good, new research shows
According to researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, calling climate engineering a public good misrepresents the technical definition of a public good and doesn't account for the potentially negative impacts of climate engineering. (2019-10-31)
Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains
Fossil pollen can help reconstruct the past and predict the future. (2019-10-30)
Drones help map Iceland's disappearing glaciers
Dr. Kieran Baxter from the University of Dundee has created composite images that compare views from 1980s aerial surveys to modern-day photos captured with the help of state-of-the-art technology. (2019-10-30)
Abrupt shifts in Arctic climate projected
Researchers from McGill University project that as the permafrost continues to degrade, the climate in various regions of the Arctic could potentially change abruptly in the relatively near future. (2019-10-30)
Climate models and geology reveal new insights into the East Asian monsoon
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have used climate models and geological records to better understand changes in the East Asian monsoon over long geologic time scales. (2019-10-30)
Intact forest loss 'six times worse' for climate
The impact of losing intact tropical forests is more devastating on the climate than previously thought, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2019-10-30)
Intensified global monsoon extreme rainfall signals global warming -- A study
A new study reveals significant associations between global warming and the observed intensification of extreme rainfall over the global monsoon region and its several subregions, including the southern part of South Africa, India, North America and the eastern part of the South America. (2019-10-30)
Where to install renewable energy in US to achieve greatest benefits
A new Harvard study shows that to achieve the biggest improvements in public health and the greatest benefits from renewable energy, wind turbines should be installed in the Upper Midwest and solar power should be installed in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions. (2019-10-29)
Climate change could drive British crop farming north and west
Unchecked climate change could drive Britain's crop growing north and west, leaving the east and south east unable to support crop growing, new research suggests. (2019-10-29)
Scientists warn of new health threat caused by global warming
We know global warming will affect food production, but Australian researchers believe it is also likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure. (2019-10-29)
Overcoming weak governance will take decades with implications for climate adaptation
Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-10-28)
Improving governance is key for adaptive capacity
Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability. (2019-10-28)
Daylight not rain most important for Africa 'green-up' phenomenon
Contrary to popular belief, seasonal rains are not the most important factor for starting the growth cycle of plants across Africa. (2019-10-25)
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