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Current Cochlear implant News and Events

Current Cochlear implant News and Events, Cochlear implant News Articles.
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EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again. (2019-10-16)
Stanford scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate
Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion -- a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University. (2019-10-03)
Mild-to-moderate hearing loss in children leads to changes in how brain processes sound
Deafness in early childhood is known to lead to lasting changes in how sounds are processed in the brain, but new research published today in eLife shows that even mild-to-moderate levels of hearing loss in young children can lead to similar changes. (2019-10-01)
Researchers can now place single ions into solids
New technique enables implantation of individual ions into crystals with an accuracy of 35 nanometers. (2019-09-24)
Long-acting injectable multi-drug implant shows promise for HIV prevention and treatment
UNC researchers have created an injectable multi-drug delivery system that is removable, biodegradable and effective for up to a year in some cases. (2019-09-20)
ENT researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Annual Meeting
The most current research on head and neck cancer, cochlear implants, techniques in tonsillectomies, opioid prescribing patterns, residency matching, and other topics related to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be presented in New Orleans, LA, September 15-18, 2019, during the 2019 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. (2019-09-09)
Sound deprivation in one ear leads to speech recognition difficulties
Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to the results of a new study of 240 patients, led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. (2019-09-06)
Who benefits from a defibrillator?
Implantable defibrillators can save lives, but also harbor risks. A major European study headed by three researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), LMU München and University Medical Center Göttingen has found that a special ECG method can help to identify the patients most likely to benefit from these devices. (2019-09-03)
Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind
EPFL scientists are investigating new ways to provide visual signals to the blind by directly stimulating the optic nerve. (2019-08-19)
Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body
EPFL researchers have developed biodegradable microresonators that can be heated locally with a wireless system. (2019-08-07)
Manipulating brain cells by smartphone
Researchers have developed a soft neural implant that can be wirelessly controlled using a smartphone. (2019-08-06)
Pregnancy problems may lead to later cardiac trouble in adult children
A new study in Cardiovascular Research finds that female offspring of females with polycystic ovary syndrome have an increased risk for developing cardiac dysfunction. (2019-08-05)
Scientists can now manipulate brain cells using smartphone
A team of scientists in Korea and the United States have invented a device that can control neural circuits using a tiny brain implant controlled by a smartphone. (2019-08-05)
In the inner depths of the ear: The shape of the cochlea is an indicator of sex
The auditory section of the inner ear, or the 'cochlea,' does not have the same shape from birth depending on whether one is a man or a woman. (2019-08-05)
Researchers find proteins that might restore damaged sound-detecting cells in the ear
Using genetic tools in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified a pair of proteins that precisely control when sound-detecting cells, known as hair cells, are born in the mammalian inner ear. (2019-08-05)
Another trick up the immune system's sleeve: Regrowing blood vessels
Peripheral artery disease, which affects 8.5 million people in the US, can cut off blood flow to the arms and legs, sometimes forcing doctors to amputate limbs. (2019-07-31)
Increased use of partial knee replacement could save the NHS £30 million per year
New research from a randomised clinical trial published today in The Lancet and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) shows that partial knee replacements (PKR) are as good as total knee replacements (TKR), whilst being more cost effective. (2019-07-17)
BioSA -- Bridging the gap with biodegradable metals
The University of Malta has teamed up with Mater Dei Hospital to address the shortcomings of current bone scaffolds on the market in a project entitled Biodegradable Iron for Orthopaedic Scaffold Applications -- BioSA. (2019-07-01)
Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired
Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. (2019-06-27)
Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of grape may help chronic disease management
People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled. (2019-06-25)
Hydrogel offers double punch against orthopedic bone infections
Surgery prompted by automobile accidents, combat wounds, cancer treatment and other conditions can lead to bone infections that are difficult to treat and can delay healing until they are resolved. (2019-06-24)
Non-invasive, more precise preimplantation genetic test under development for IVF embryos
A team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with colleagues at Peking University and Yikon Genomics in China, have evaluated a new way to conduct preimplantation genetic testing and present results showing that this new method may improve the reliability of the test. (2019-06-24)
Do women regret embryo testing before IVF?
By the time a woman is 44 years old, the vast majority of her embryos will be abnormal. (2019-06-21)
The Lancet: First randomised trial finds no substantial difference in risk of acquiring HIV for three different forms of contraception
A randomised trial of more than 7,800 African women found that a type of contraceptive injection (intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate -- DMPA-IM) posed no substantially increased risk of HIV acquisition when compared with a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant. (2019-06-13)
Implanted drug 'reservoir' safely reduces injections for people with macular degeneration
In a clinical trial of 220 people with 'wet' age-related macular degeneration, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, collaborators from many sites across the country, and Genentech in South San Francisco have added to evidence that using a new implant technology that continuously delivers medication into the eyes is safe and effective in helping maintain vision and reduces the need for injections in the eyes. (2019-06-13)
Hearing through your fingers: Device that converts speech
A novel study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience provides the first evidence that a simple and inexpensive non-invasive speech-to-touch sensory substitution device has the potential to improve hearing in hearing-impaired cochlear implant patients, as well as individuals with normal hearing, to better discern speech in various situations like learning a second language or trying to deal with the 'cocktail party effect.' The device can provide immediate multisensory enhancement without any training. (2019-06-03)
Microbes on explanted pedicle screws: Possible cause of spinal implant failure
In this paper, the authors demonstrate a significant association between pedicle screw loosening and the presence of low-virulent pathogens on spinal implants. (2019-05-28)
All ears: Genetic bases of mammalian inner ear evolution
Mammals have also a remarkable capacity in their sense of hearing, from the high-frequency echolocation calls of bats to low frequency whale songs. (2019-05-28)
Noninvasive biomarker for Parkinson's disease possibly found in EEG data
Specific angles and sharpness of brain waves seen in unfiltered raw data from scalp electroencephalograms have been tied to Parkinson's disease. (2019-05-20)
Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures
The CT scan revealed cochlear coiling with more turns than in animals with echolocation, indicating hearing more similar to the cloven-hoofed, terrestrial mammals dolphins came from than the sleek sea creatures they are today. (2019-05-14)
A new system for treating type 1 diabetes mellitus
Thanks to an innovative system of magnetic microcapsule separation, the Nanobiocel-CIBER BNN research group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country in collaboration with the BIOMICS group, also of the UPV/EHU, has managed to reduce the volume of microcapsule implants containing insulin-producing pancreatic cells by nearly 80%. (2019-05-10)
CMU researchers make transformational ai seem 'unremarkable'
A surgeon might never feel the need to ask an AI for advice, much less allow it to make a clinical decision for them, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say. (2019-05-08)
Study reveals hip and knee replacement performance in England and Wales
The performance of different prosthetic implant combinations used in patients undergoing hip and knee replacements in England and Wales over the last 14 years have, for the first time, been directly compared in two new studies. (2019-04-29)
Risk factors identified for patients undergoing knee replacements
In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the Musculoskeletal Research Unit at the University of Bristol have identified the most important risk factors for developing severe infection after knee replacement. (2019-04-17)
3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed a unique 3D-printed transparent skull implant for mice that provides an opportunity to watch activity of the entire brain surface in real time. (2019-04-02)
3D printed tissues may keep athletes in action
Bioscientists at Rice and the University of Maryland with the Center for Engineering Complex Tissues learn to 3D-print scaffolds that may help heal osteochondral injuries of the sort suffered by many athletes. (2019-03-28)
Hearing loss before 50 may mean higher risk of drug and alcohol issues
People under age 50 with hearing loss misuse prescription opioids at twice the rate of their hearing peers, and are also more likely to misuse alcohol and other drugs, a new national study finds. (2019-03-25)
Naltrexone implant helps HIV patients with opioid dependence prevent relapse
A new study, published this month in Lancet HIV by Penn Medicine researchers, shows that a naltrexone implant placed under the skin was more effective at helping HIV-positive patients with an opioid addiction reduce relapse and have better HIV-related outcomes compared to the oral drug. (2019-03-21)
From foam to bone: Plant cellulose can pave the way for healthy bone implants
Researchers from the University of British Columbia and McMaster University have developed what could be the bone implant material of the future: an airy, foamlike substance from plant cellulose that can be injected into the body and provide scaffolding for the growth of new bone. (2019-03-19)
No increased risk of complications for joint replacement in ambulatory surgery setting
Researchers conducted a study to compare patient outcomes and costs for in-patient hip and knee replacement surgeries to those performed in an ambulatory surgery center. (2019-03-14)
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