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Current Cognitive decline News and Events

Current Cognitive decline News and Events, Cognitive decline News Articles.
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Hydration may affect cognitive function in some older adults
Among women, lower hydration levels were associated with lower scores on a task designed to measure motor speed, sustained attention, and working memory. (2019-12-12)
All age groups worldwide 'at high risk' of drop in children's physical activity
Emphasis on particular groups hinders efforts to address the problem of declining physical activity in children, according to a study led at the University of Strathclyde. (2019-12-11)
Report discusses potential role of coffee in reducing risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. (2019-12-10)
Treating more than just the heart is critical for geriatric patients
Geriatric conditions such as frailty, cognitive impairment, taking multiple medications and having multiple medical conditions complicate care for older people with acute cardiovascular diseases. (2019-12-09)
Dead probiotic strain shown to reduce harmful, aging-related inflammation
Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have identified a dead probiotic that reduces age-related leaky gut in older mice. (2019-12-09)
Inflammatory marker linked to dementia
Higher levels of an inflammatory marker, sCD14, were associated with brain atrophy, cognitive decline and dementia in two large heart studies. (2019-12-09)
Brain function abnormal in children with Type 1 diabetes, Stanford-led study finds
Children with Type 1 diabetes show subtle but important differences in brain function compared with those who don't have the disease, a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown. (2019-12-09)
Anti-hepatitis medicine surprises
A new effective treatment of hepatitis C not only combats the virus, but is also effective against potentially fatal complications such as reduced liver functioning and cirrhosis. (2019-12-05)
By imaging the brain, scientists can predict a person's aptitude for training
People with specific brain attributes are more likely than others to benefit from targeted cognitive interventions designed to enhance fluid intelligence, scientists report in a new study. (2019-12-04)
Online therapy helped cardiovascular disease patients with depression
Researchers at Linköping University have developed a treatment for depression among people with cardiovascular disease. (2019-12-04)
Bone and muscle health can 'make or break' care as we age
Experts at a prestigious medical conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by the National Institutes of Health's (NIH's) National Institute on Aging (NIA) hope their work -- reported this week in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) -- can help yield hard evidence to address the range of 'soft tissue' and bone disorders that contribute to falls, fractures, and muscle loss as we age. (2019-12-04)
When reefs die, parrotfish thrive
In contrast to most other species, reef-dwelling parrotfish populations boom in the wake of severe coral bleaching. (2019-12-02)
SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. (2019-11-28)
New study shows a minimum dose of hydromethylthionine could slow cognitive decline
In a paper published in today's online issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, TauRx has reported unexpected results of a pharmacokinetic analysis of the relationship between treatment dose, blood levels and pharmacological activity of the drug hydromethylthionine on the brain in over 1,000 patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. (2019-11-27)
Choking deaths in US children drop by 75% in past 50 years
Children's deaths from choking on small objects dropped by 75% from 1968 to 2017, according to a report published in JAMA. (2019-11-26)
Psychological well-being at 52 years could impact on cognitive functioning at 69 years
Miharu Nakanishi, Chief Researcher of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, and her colleagues finds that psychological well-being at 52 years were prospectively associated with cognitive function at 69 years. (2019-11-26)
Playing board games may help protect thinking skills in old age
People who play games -- such as cards and board games -- are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study suggests. (2019-11-26)
Aerobic exercise and heart-healthy diet may slow development of memory problems
Recently, researchers examined two potential ways to slow the development of mild cognitive impairment based on what we know about preventing heart disease. (2019-11-26)
NF decline but stable QOL in 1st year after temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy
A secondary analysis of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-RTOG 0424, which initially reported a 73.1% 3-year overall survival rate, shows a decline in neurocognitive function (NCF) for half of the trial participants with high risk, low-grade gliomas (HR-LGGs) up to a year after receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy with temozolomide. (2019-11-25)
Temple study shows extra virgin olive oil staves off multiple forms of dementia in mice
New Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University research findings in mice are the first to suggest that extra virgin olive oil can defend against a specific type of mental decline linked to tauopathy known as frontotemporal dementia. (2019-11-25)
A sleeping pill that doesn't make you sway: a new targeted insomnia treatment
University of Tsukuba researchers compared the physical and cognitive side effects of two sleep agents that affect two different kinds of brain receptor. (2019-11-22)
Predicting vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease and delirium
A paper published today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shed new light on a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease that may indirectly influence patients' risk of postoperative delirium. (2019-11-22)
Nov. journal highlights: First MCI prevalence estimates in US Latino populations
First mild cognitive impairment prevalence estimates in diverse U.S. Latino populations. (2019-11-22)
Sensory processing difficulties adversely affect functional behavior in multiple sclerosis
'This study underscores the influence of sensory processing in MS, and the importance of screening patients for these disorders,' said Dr. (2019-11-21)
UK Study: Lack of economic support hinders cognitive abilities of children of single mothers
A new study examined how the impact of single motherhood on children's verbal cognitive abilities has changed and how the age of children when their parents separate affects those abilities. (2019-11-20)
Exposure to PM 2.5 pollution linked to brain atrophy, memory decline
Women in their 70s and 80s who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution experienced greater declines in memory and more Alzheimer's-like brain atrophy than their counterparts who breathed cleaner air. (2019-11-20)
UC study estimates mild cognitive impairment among diverse Latino populations at 10%
The first and largest study of its kind has estimated the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment in diverse Latino populations. (2019-11-18)
Standard treatment programmes for OCD are not always enough
Teenagers with the contamination and washing variant of OCD are not generally more ill than children and adolescents with other forms of disabling obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviour. (2019-11-18)
Communication support technology for training surgeons has promising results
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and Anne Arundel Medical Center have conducted a study that explores how surgical trainees are experiencing a new gestural technology designed to improve communication during laparoscopic surgery. (2019-11-18)
Research reveals no link between statins and memory loss
Over 6 years, researchers evaluated the cognitive effects of statins in elderly consumers, revealing no negative impact and potential protective effects in those at risk of dementia. (2019-11-18)
Statins not associated with memory or cognition decline in elderly, may be protective in some patients
Given consumer concern that statins may be associated with memory or cognitive decline, a new study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology may offer reassurance, as no difference was found in the rate of memory or cognitive decline of elderly statin-users compared to never-users. (2019-11-18)
Among people with bipolar disorder, inflammation predicts cognitive deficits
A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital has conducted the largest study to date of people with bipolar disorder that examined whether inflammation may play an important role in patient outcomes. (2019-11-18)
Link between inflammation and mental sluggishness shown in new study
Scientists at the University of Birmingham in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam have uncovered a possible explanation for the mental sluggishness that often accompanies illness. (2019-11-15)
Link between hearing and cognition begins earlier than once thought
A new study finds that cognitive impairment begins in the earliest stages of age-related hearing loss -- when hearing is still considered normal. (2019-11-14)
Restoring protein homeostasis improves memory deficits in Down syndrome model
Researchers found that that defects in a conserved stress pathway known as the 'integrated stress response,' or ISR, could explain the cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Down syndrome. (2019-11-14)
In Down Syndrome mouse model, scientists reverse intellectual deficits with drugs
In a surprising finding using the standard animal model of Down syndrome (DS), scientists were able to correct the learning and memory deficits associated with the condition -- the leading genetic cause of cognitive disability and the most frequently diagnosed chromosomal disorder in the US -- with drugs that target the body's response to cellular stresses. (2019-11-14)
A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online. (2019-11-12)
How artificial intelligence can transform psychiatry
Scientists have developed a new mobile app that categorizes mental health status based on speech patterns. (2019-11-12)
LSU Health research discovers potential new Rx target for AMD and Alzheimer's
Research led by Nicolas Bazan, M.D., Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, found a new mechanism by which a class of molecules his lab discovered may protect brain and retinal cells against neurodegenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration and Alzheimer's. (2019-11-11)
Researchers report new insights into Parkinson's disease-related mortality
By following a group of newly diagnosed patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) for a decade or more, researchers have been able to identify several factors never before reported that appear to be associated with higher mortality rates in PD patients compared to the general population. (2019-11-08)
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