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Current Cognitive decline News and Events

Current Cognitive decline News and Events, Cognitive decline News Articles.
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No link found between youth contact sports and cognitive, mental health problems
Adolescents who play contact sports, including football, are no more likely to experience cognitive impairment, depression or suicidal thoughts in early adulthood than their peers, suggests a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 11,000 youth followed for 14 years. (2019-10-21)
Twin study shows what's good for the heart is good for the brain
Emory University researchers are giving us double the reasons to pay attention to our cardiovascular health - showing in a recently published study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease that good heart health can equal good brain health. (2019-10-21)
Metabolic disturbance in the brain exacerbates, may forewarn Alzheimer's pathology
A better understanding of the metabolic processes in the brain -- specifically disturbances resulting from neurodegenerative diseases -- has important implications for potential treatments. (2019-10-20)
Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans
Local biodiversity of species -- the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity -- is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes. (2019-10-17)
Research gauges neurodegeneration tied to FXTAS by measuring motor behavior
Research published in Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience by a team headquartered at the University of Kansas' Life Span Institute used a grip-force test to analyze sensorimotor function in people with the FMR1 premutation, with the aim of determining FXTAS risk and severity. (2019-10-17)
Hormone therapy associated with improved cognition
Estrogen has a significant role in overall brain health and cognitive function. (2019-10-16)
Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants
Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences. (2019-10-16)
'Whoa, I didn't expect that'
Babies seek to understand the world around them and learn many new things every day. (2019-10-15)
More aggressive blood pressure control benefits brains of older adults
The UConn Health study followed 199 hypertension patients 75 years of age and older for 3 years. (2019-10-15)
Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: Evidence from brain connectivity evaluation
The researchers recruited healthy older participants to two groups according to their history of tea drinking frequency and investigated both functional and structural networks to reveal the role of tea drinking on brain organization. (2019-10-11)
Linguists track impact of cognitive decline across three decades of one writer's diaries
Linguistics researchers have identified a relationship between language change and the transition from healthy to a diagnosis of severe dementia. (2019-10-10)
Study links sleep disturbances and Alzheimer's among Hispanics
Sleep disturbances among Hispanics may increase their risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study led by a University of Miami Miller School neurologist and sleep expert. (2019-10-09)
New research raises important questions on how mental illness is currently diagnosed
This research raises questions as to whether current diagnoses accurately reflect the underlying neurobiology of mental illness. (2019-10-09)
Population shift resulting in fewer homicides
People are living longer and fewer are having children. This has caused the 15-29 age group to shrink worldwide, a demographic responsible for majority of homicides. (2019-10-09)
Ex-smokers, light smokers not exempt from lung damage
A new study shows that smoking even a few cigarettes a day is harmful to lungs and that former smokers continue to lose lung function at a faster rate than never-smokers for decades after quitting. (2019-10-09)
Number of depressed over-65s unchanged but antidepressant use soars
The proportion of people aged over 65 on antidepressants has more than doubled in two decades -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia. (2019-10-06)
Decades-long drop in breast cancer death rate continues
A decades-long decline in the breast cancer death rate continues, but has begun to slow in recent years. (2019-10-02)
Fragmented physical activity linked to greater mortality risk
Although reduced physical activity during the day is widely seen as a harbinger of mortality in older people, fragmentation of physical activity--spreading daily activity across more episodes of brief activity--may be an earlier indicator of mortality risk than total amount of daily activity, according to a new study from scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-10-02)
Nuclear war between India and Pakistan could kill millions worldwide
More than 100 million people could die immediately if India and Pakistan wage a nuclear war, followed by global mass starvation, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2019-10-02)
Discovered: Possible therapeutic target for slow healing of aged muscles
An age-related decline in recovery from muscle injury can be traced to a protein that suppresses the special ability of muscle stem cells to build new muscles, according to work from a team of current and former Carnegie biologists led by Chen-Ming Fan and published in Nature Metabolism. (2019-09-30)
Risk of heart valve infections rising in hospitals
People with heart disease or defective or artificial heart valves are at increased risk of developing a potentially deadly valve infection. (2019-09-29)
Teens sleep 43 more minutes per night after combo of 2 treatments, study finds
Teenagers got 43 more minutes of sleep a night after a four-week intervention that reset their body clocks and helped them go to bed earlier, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown. (2019-09-27)
Study examines alcohol consumption, risk of dementia in older adults
This observational study examined alcohol consumption and the risk of dementia and cognitive decline in older adults with or without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). (2019-09-27)
People living near green spaces are at lower risk of metabolic syndrome
A study analyses for the first time the relation between long-term exposure to residential green spaces and a cluster of conditions that include obesity and hypertension. (2019-09-26)
Sport has its benefits but do not overdo it
In top athletes, excess physical activity can be harmful, as cases of 'overtraining syndrome' suggest. (2019-09-26)
Dog rabies vaccination programs affect human exposure, prophylaxis use
The World Health Organization has made it a goal to eliminate human rabies deaths due to dog bites by the year 2030. (2019-09-26)
Teens sleep 43 more minutes per night after combo of two treatments, Stanford study finds
Teenagers got 43 more minutes of sleep a night after a four-week intervention that reset their body clocks and helped them go to bed earlier, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown. (2019-09-25)
Menopausal night sweats linked with cognitive dysfunction
Experts frequently tout the value of a good night's sleep. (2019-09-24)
Researchers relate neuropsychological tests with real-life activity in multiple sclerosis
To best serve the clinical needs of individuals with MS, neuropsychological testing needs to be viewed in larger context comprising non-cognitive variables, such as motor ability and demographic values, fatigue and depression, and disease activity and level of disability, as well as person-specific factors such as personality and coping styles. (2019-09-19)
Nearly three billion fewer birds in North America since 1970
North America has lost nearly three billion birds since 1970, according to a new report, which also details widespread population declines among hundreds of North American bird species, including those once considered abundant. (2019-09-19)
Age-related decline in immune function takes sheep to the grave earlier
For the sheep of St. Kilda, growing old brings with it a late-life decline in immune resistance against pervasive parasitic worms, which greatly reduces the animal's chances of surviving overwinter, regardless of overall physiological condition. (2019-09-19)
Actions to save coral reefs could benefit all ecosystems
Scientists say bolder actions to protect the world's coral reefs will benefit all ecosystems, human livelihoods and improve food security. (2019-09-18)
Alzheimer's memory loss reversed by new head device using electromagnetic waves
Phoenix, AZ (September 17, 2019) - There is finally some encouraging news for the millions of Americans suffering from Alzheimer's Disease. (2019-09-17)
Meal type and size are the key factors affecting carb-counting in type 1 diabetes
Meal type and size are the most important factors influencing the accuracy of carb-counting for the control of blood sugar in type 1 diabetes, according to new research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. (2019-09-16)
Study led by NUS scientists show that drinking tea improves brain health
A recent study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore revealed that regular tea drinkers have better organised brain regions compared to non-tea drinkers. (2019-09-12)
Popular mobile games can be used to detect signs of cognitive decline
New research shows that popular mobile phone games such as Tetris, Candy Crush Saga and Fruit Ninja could provide a new tool to help doctors spot early signs of cognitive decline, some of which may indicate the onset of serious conditions like dementia. (2019-09-12)
Repeated periods of poverty accelerate the ageing process
People who have found themselves below the relative poverty threshold four or more times in their adult life age significantly earlier than others. (2019-09-12)
Abnormal gut bugs tied to worse cognitive performance in vets with PTSD and cirrhosis
A study involving military veterans with PTSD and cirrhosis of the liver points to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the intestines as a possible driver of poor cognitive performance -- and as a potential target for therapy. (2019-09-12)
Hoary bat numbers declining at rate that suggests species in jeopardy in Pacific Northwest
The hoary bat, the species of bat most frequently found dead at wind power facilities, is declining at a rate that threatens its long-term future in the Pacific Northwest, according to a novel and comprehensive research collaboration. (2019-09-11)
Brain changes may help track dementia, even before diagnosis
Even before a dementia diagnosis, people with mild cognitive impairment may have different changes in the brain depending on what type of dementia they have, according to a study published in the September 11, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-09-11)
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