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Current Cognitive impairment News and Events

Current Cognitive impairment News and Events, Cognitive impairment News Articles.
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Dementia and eating disorders: it is a problem of (semantic) memory
Eating disorders shown by patients with dementia are characterised by a vast range of behaviours that span from preference for sugary foods, binges, increase in appetite, to changes in table manners or in food preferences. (2019-10-17)
Hormone therapy associated with improved cognition
Estrogen has a significant role in overall brain health and cognitive function. (2019-10-16)
Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants
Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences. (2019-10-16)
'Whoa, I didn't expect that'
Babies seek to understand the world around them and learn many new things every day. (2019-10-15)
More aggressive blood pressure control benefits brains of older adults
The UConn Health study followed 199 hypertension patients 75 years of age and older for 3 years. (2019-10-15)
Linguists track impact of cognitive decline across three decades of one writer's diaries
Linguistics researchers have identified a relationship between language change and the transition from healthy to a diagnosis of severe dementia. (2019-10-10)
Synaptic function closely tied to overall need for sleep, regardless of day or night
The natural need for sleep and the brain's synaptic function are closely linked, according to a pair of studies in mice, which suggest that sleep deprivation may also deprive the brain of key proteins required for synaptic activities including plasticity. (2019-10-10)
Study links sleep disturbances and Alzheimer's among Hispanics
Sleep disturbances among Hispanics may increase their risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study led by a University of Miami Miller School neurologist and sleep expert. (2019-10-09)
NSU professor's research underpins World Health Organization first ever report on vision
Dr. Janet Leasher, optometrist and professor of health policy, economics and public health at Nova Southeastern University's (NSU) College of Optometry was the only optometrist from the United States who is part of the core Vision Loss Expert Group which provided the estimates on the numbers of persons affected around the world with blindness and vision impairment. (2019-10-09)
New research raises important questions on how mental illness is currently diagnosed
This research raises questions as to whether current diagnoses accurately reflect the underlying neurobiology of mental illness. (2019-10-09)
Number of depressed over-65s unchanged but antidepressant use soars
The proportion of people aged over 65 on antidepressants has more than doubled in two decades -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia. (2019-10-06)
Genetics researchers find new neurodevelopmental syndrome
Researchers have identified a gene mutation that causes developmental delay, intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities and musculoskeletal problems in children. (2019-10-03)
Heart failure and the obesity paradox
While obesity significantly increases your chances of developing heart failure, for those with established heart failure it may confer a survival benefit compared with normal weight or underweight individuals. (2019-10-03)
Chair yoga more effective than music therapy in older adults with advanced dementia
Researchers assessed the ability of older adults with advanced dementia to participate in non-pharmacological interventions and compared chair yoga with chair-based exercise and music therapy. (2019-10-02)
Teens sleep 43 more minutes per night after combo of 2 treatments, study finds
Teenagers got 43 more minutes of sleep a night after a four-week intervention that reset their body clocks and helped them go to bed earlier, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown. (2019-09-27)
Study examines alcohol consumption, risk of dementia in older adults
This observational study examined alcohol consumption and the risk of dementia and cognitive decline in older adults with or without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). (2019-09-27)
New findings enable more heart donations
There is a risk of every fourth heart examined for possible donation being dismissed as unusable due to stress-induced heart failure. (2019-09-26)
Sport has its benefits but do not overdo it
In top athletes, excess physical activity can be harmful, as cases of 'overtraining syndrome' suggest. (2019-09-26)
Teens sleep 43 more minutes per night after combo of two treatments, Stanford study finds
Teenagers got 43 more minutes of sleep a night after a four-week intervention that reset their body clocks and helped them go to bed earlier, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown. (2019-09-25)
How and why does Parkinson's disease effect women and men differently?
There is growing evidence that Parkinson's disease (PD) affects women and men differently. (2019-09-25)
Menopausal night sweats linked with cognitive dysfunction
Experts frequently tout the value of a good night's sleep. (2019-09-24)
Leukemia drug shows promise for treating a childhood brain cancer
Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego researchers describe new use of leukemia drug, nilotinib, to treat subtype of medulloblastoma, a deadly pediatric brain cancer. (2019-09-20)
Researchers relate neuropsychological tests with real-life activity in multiple sclerosis
To best serve the clinical needs of individuals with MS, neuropsychological testing needs to be viewed in larger context comprising non-cognitive variables, such as motor ability and demographic values, fatigue and depression, and disease activity and level of disability, as well as person-specific factors such as personality and coping styles. (2019-09-19)
Alzheimer's memory loss reversed by new head device using electromagnetic waves
Phoenix, AZ (September 17, 2019) - There is finally some encouraging news for the millions of Americans suffering from Alzheimer's Disease. (2019-09-17)
Study led by NUS scientists show that drinking tea improves brain health
A recent study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore revealed that regular tea drinkers have better organised brain regions compared to non-tea drinkers. (2019-09-12)
Repeated periods of poverty accelerate the ageing process
People who have found themselves below the relative poverty threshold four or more times in their adult life age significantly earlier than others. (2019-09-12)
Abnormal gut bugs tied to worse cognitive performance in vets with PTSD and cirrhosis
A study involving military veterans with PTSD and cirrhosis of the liver points to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the intestines as a possible driver of poor cognitive performance -- and as a potential target for therapy. (2019-09-12)
Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss in Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia but the changes in brain cell function underlying memory loss remains poorly understood. (2019-09-11)
Brain changes may help track dementia, even before diagnosis
Even before a dementia diagnosis, people with mild cognitive impairment may have different changes in the brain depending on what type of dementia they have, according to a study published in the September 11, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-09-11)
How the eyes might be windows to the risk of Alzheimer's disease
UC San Diego researchers say that measuring how quickly a person's pupil dilates while they are taking cognitive tests may be a low-cost, low-invasive method to aid in screening individuals at increased genetic risk for AD before cognitive decline begins. (2019-09-10)
New biomarker for dementia improves risk prediction
In a new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers have measured circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2), a potential biomarker for dementia. (2019-09-10)
New app offers faster and easier assessment for multiple sclerosis
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed and validated a tablet-based app that offers a faster, easier and more accurate way for health care providers who don't have specialized training to assess the cognitive function of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). (2019-09-09)
Preventing the onset of schizophrenia in mouse model
Although predisposing processes occur earlier, schizophrenia breaks out at young adulthood, suggesting it might involve a pathological transition during late brain development in predisposed individuals. (2019-09-09)
The fast and the curious: Fitter adults have fitter brains
In a large study, German scientists have shown that physical fitness is associated with better brain structure and brain functioning in young adults. (2019-09-09)
High blood pressure treatment may slow cognitive decline
Among middle-aged and older adults, high blood pressure accelerated cognitive decline and treatment slowed the regression. (2019-09-05)
Diet's effect on gut bacteria could play role in reducing Alzheimer's risk
Could following a certain type of diet affect the gut microbiome -- the good and bad bacteria that live in the gastrointestinal tract -- in ways that decrease the risk of Alzheimer's disease? (2019-09-03)
The brain processes words placed on the right side of a screen more quickly
When reading words on a screen, the human brain comprehends words placed on the right side of the screen faster. (2019-09-03)
Heart failure patients have similar odds of dementia-type brain lesions as stroke patients
A type of brain damage linked with dementia and cognitive impairment is as common in heart failure patients as it is in patients with a history of stroke, according to findings from the LIFE-Adult-Study presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. (2019-09-02)
Map of broken brain networks shows why people lose speech in language-based dementia
Scientists have drawn a map that illustrates three regions in the brain of people with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) that fail to talk to each other, inhibiting a person's speech production, word finding and word comprehension. (2019-09-01)
Victorian child hearing-loss databank to go global
A unique databank that profiles children with hearing loss will help researchers globally understand why some children adapt and thrive, while others struggle. (2019-08-30)
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