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Current Collagen News and Events

Current Collagen News and Events, Collagen News Articles.
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Imaging tumor stiffness could help enhance treatment for breast and pancreatic cancer
Using a noninvasive imaging technique that measures the stiffness of tissues gives crucial new information about cancer architecture and could aid the delivery of treatment to the most challenging tumors, new research shows. (2019-10-11)
How skin cells from foot soles could help relieve amputees of stump injury
Imperial scientists hope to re-engineer stump skin for more comfortable prosthetics -- using skin from the sole of the foot as a template. (2019-10-10)
Treatment for 'low T' could someday come from a single skin cell, USC research shows
USC researchers have successfully grown human, testosterone-producing cells in the lab, paving the way to someday treat low testosterone with personalized replacement cells. (2019-10-07)
Burt's Bees presents clinical data demonstrating proven efficacy of natural skin care
At this year's Integrative Dermatology Symposium, Burt's Bees, a pioneer in natural skin care, will be presenting research supporting the role of efficacy-first natural regimens for skin health. (2019-10-03)
Collagen fibers encourage cell streaming through balancing act
Engineers from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University have shown that the length of collagen fibers has a roll to play in the ability of normal cells to become invasive. (2019-10-01)
Preserving old bones with modern technology
A team of University of Colorado Boulder anthropologists is out to change the way that scientists study old bones damage-free. (2019-09-26)
Smoothing wrinkles in mice -- without needles
In the quest for a more youthful appearance, many people slather ointments on their skin or undergo injections of dermal fillers. (2019-09-25)
Mast cell expansion from blood
Mast cells are critically involved in immunity and immune disorders. (2019-09-19)
Suntanner, heal thyself: Exosome therapy may enable better repair of sun, age-damaged skin
In a proof-of-concept study, researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that exosomes harvested from human skin cells are more effective at repairing sun-damaged skin cells in mice than popular retinol or stem cell-based treatments currently in use. (2019-09-18)
Genetic mutation linked to flu-related heart complications
For the first time, research in mice has shown a link between a genetic mutation, flu and heart irregularities that researchers say might one day improve the care of flu patients. (2019-09-10)
Study shows BioCell collagen can visibly reduce common signs of skin aging within 12 weeks
In one of the most substantial studies of a skin health supplement, BioCell Collagen®, was found to visibly reduce common signs of skin aging, including lines and wrinkles, within 12 weeks of daily use. (2019-09-04)
Addition of growth factors to unique system helps new bone formation
New technique aids bone formation. (2019-08-28)
Microneedling improves appearance of acne scars
It turns out creating tiny injuries on your face with needles actually helps decrease the appearance of acne scars. (2019-08-09)
Non-invasive imaging method spots cancer at the molecular level
Researchers for the first time have combined a powerful microscopy technique with automated image analysis algorithms to distinguish between healthy and metastatic cancerous tissue without relying on invasive biopsies or the use of a contrast dye. (2019-08-06)
'Bone in a dish' opens new window on cancer initiation, metastasis, bone healing
Researchers in Oregon have engineered a material that replicates human bone tissue with an unprecedented level of precision, from its microscopic crystal structure to its biological activity. (2019-08-06)
Paper trail leads to heart valve discoveries
Rice University bioengineers are studying heart disease with paper-based structures that mimic the layered nature of aortic valves, the tough, flexible tissues that keep blood flowing in one direction only. (2019-08-05)
FRESH 3D printing used to rebuild functional components of human heart
Scientists are a major step closer to 3D bioprintng functional organs, after team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers devise a method of rebuilding components of the human heart, according to a study published in Science. (2019-08-01)
3D printing new parts for our broken hearts
Researchers have developed a 'FRESH' new method of 3D printing complex anatomical structures out of collagen -- a primary building block in many human tissues. (2019-08-01)
3D printing the human heart
CMU researchers have published in Science a new 3D bioprinting method that brings the field of tissue engineering one step closer to being able to 3D print a full-sized, adult human heart. (2019-08-01)
Autopsies reveal how meth hurts the heart
Autopsy samples reveal that methamphetamine use makes dangerous structural changes in heart muscle that increase the risk of heart attack, sudden cardiac death and heart failure. (2019-08-01)
I see the pattern under your skin
By combining multiphoton imaging and biaxial tissue extension a research team from Japan found that collagen in the skin is organized in a mesh-like structure, and that elastic fibers -- the connective tissue found in skin -- follows the same orientation. (2019-07-31)
Laboratory study paves way for new approach to treating hair loss in humans
Japanese scientists have developed an efficient method of successfully generating hair growth in nude mice. (2019-07-29)
The effects of skin aging vary depending on ethnicity, review finds
Neelam Vashi, M.D., director of the Center for Ethnic Skin at Boston Medical Center, has published a review paper in Clinics in Dermatology that discusses how aging presents in patients, and the differences that are attributed to skin type, exposures and genetic factors. (2019-07-26)
New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues
Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues. (2019-07-24)
'Kneeding' a break: First evidence ACL injuries an overuse failure
Repetitive knee stress and failure to accommodate sufficient rest between periods of strenuous exercise may be key factors behind the rapid rise in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in world sport, a new international study has found. (2019-07-23)
Researchers survey immune molecules found inside mycetoma lesions
Mycetoma is a common neglected disease caused by either fungi or bacteria which organize themselves into grains--areas of inflammation surrounded by a collagen capsule. (2019-07-11)
Scientists find urine test could offer a non-invasive approach for diagnosis of IBS
Scientists at McMaster University have identified new biomarkers for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in urine, which could lead to better treatments and reduce the need for costly and invasive colonoscopy procedures currently used for diagnosis. (2019-07-08)
GW pilot study finds collagen to be effective in wound closure
Researchers in the George Washington University Department of Dermatology found that collagen powder is just as effective in managing skin biopsy wounds as primary closure with non-absorbable sutures. (2019-07-08)
Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg. (2019-06-28)
Confining cell-killing treatments to tumors
Researchers at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT have developed a technique to prevent cytokines escaping once they have been injected into the tumor, by adding a Velcro-like protein that attaches itself to the tissue. (2019-06-26)
Engineers 3D print flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces
MIT engineers have designed pliable, 3D-printed mesh materials whose flexibility and toughness they can tune to emulate and support softer tissues such as muscles and tendons. (2019-06-20)
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals
Researchers from the UAB and the IMIM published in Scientific Reports the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety problems. (2019-06-19)
Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life
Scientists went looking for preserved collagen, the protein in bone and skin, in dinosaur fossils. (2019-06-18)
Worm study sparks hope for slowing muscle decline
Muscle decline caused by ageing and certain diseases could be dramatically slowed by stopping a chain reaction that damages cells, new research shows. (2019-06-07)
3D printed artificial corneas similar to human ones
Professor Dong-Woo Cho of Mechanical Engineering, Professor Jinah Jang of Creative IT Convergence Engineering, and Ms. (2019-05-28)
Vascularized kidney tissue engineered by WFIRM scientists
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) researchers have shown the feasibility of bioengineering vascularized functional renal tissues for kidney regeneration, developing a partial augmentation strategy that may be a more feasible and practical approach than creating whole organs. (2019-05-22)
A better understanding of the von Willebrand Factor's A2 domain
A team of Lehigh University researchers is working to characterize the mysterious protein known as the Von Willebrand Factor (vWF). (2019-05-20)
Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower
In a new study published in EPJ E, two researchers at the Universite Paris-sud in Orsay, France, examine the patterns developed by collagen fibers, found in the tissues of virtually all animals. (2019-05-13)
Making a meal of it: Mosquito spit protein controls blood feeding
Researchers led by Kanazawa University developed a transgenic approach to inactivating the mosquito salivary protein AAPP. (2019-05-10)
Tibetan plateau first occupied by middle Pleistocene Denisovans
A joint research team led by CHEN Fahu from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and ZHANG Dongju from the Lanzhou University reported their studies on a human mandible found in Xiahe, on the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. (2019-05-07)
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