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Current Compensation News and Events

Current Compensation News and Events, Compensation News Articles.
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NYU Abu Dhabi researchers unlock the secrets of liver regeneration
In a recent study published in the journal Developmental Cell, NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have reported a new way in which the liver is primed to regenerate itself. (2019-06-20)
Gender pay gap shrinking for some female university presidents
While serious economic and societal issues continue to swirl around the gender pay gap, new research published in the INFORMS journal Organization Science shows one area where this inequality is starting to disappear -- higher education. (2019-06-17)
Women caught in a pickle by their own immune systems
A team of scientists at Arizona State University is presenting a new hypothesis to explain why there are differences between women and men when it comes to human diseases. (2019-06-11)
Good leadership and values key to staff satisfaction, study finds
Tourism and hospitality firms that score highly for leadership and cultural values see higher staff satisfaction, according to a new study by the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-05-20)
Detecting dementia's damaging effects before it's too late
Patients with a rare neurodegenerative brain disorder called Primary Progressive Aphasia, or PPA, show abnormalities in brain function in areas that look structurally normal on an MRI scan. (2019-05-13)
Feeling valued, respected appear most important for job satisfaction in academic medicine
A survey of physicians in the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine finds that feeling valued, being treated with respect and working in a supportive environment were the factors most strongly associated with job satisfaction. (2019-05-06)
New discovery in how mammals sense the cold could lead to new pain relief drugs
Researchers at UCL have shown for the first time that mammals detect different intensities of cold using distinct sensory neuron systems, a finding which could lead to the development of new drugs to treat cold pain. (2019-04-24)
From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine
Scientists at Osaka University determined the intrinsic birefringence of cellulose molecules, which have great potential to improve smartphone and computer screens. (2019-04-18)
VA's process for determining TBI in veterans seeking disability compensation examined in new report
The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) should expand the requirement in its disability compensation process regarding who can diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI) to include any health care professional with pertinent and ongoing brain injury training and experience, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2019-04-10)
Rainforest conservation in Peru must become more effective
A few years ago, the Peruvian government launched a program to protect the rainforest. (2019-04-05)
UTA biologist shows new insights into chromosome evolution, venom regulation in snakes
In a new paper, a team of biologists addressed genomic questions by generating and analyzing the first most complete chromosome-level genome for a snake -- the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis). (2019-03-29)
Russian scientists have determined indicators of stress development in the human body
In today's life, we often encounter situations when the organism's functions are overstrained, and the action of extreme factors causes the development of a stress response. (2019-03-15)
Gender-based salary gap persists among academic emergency medicine physicians
Although overall salaries for emergency physicians have increased over the past four years, and despite a call to end gender disparities in salary, men still make 18 percent more than women, and a $12,000 gender salary gap remains essentially unchanged. (2019-03-11)
Want to save the planet? Stop trying to be its friend
Research published in Frontiers in Psychology reveals how advertisers, politicians and economic systems play on the psychology of 'climate compensation' -- and encourages a more rational approach to environmental responsibility. (2019-03-04)
When research participation pays, some people lie, Penn study suggests
Offering compensation can be an important tactic to attract potential participants for enrollment in research studies, but it might come at a cost. (2019-02-14)
How to pay top executives if you want them to be innovative
When pay dispersion is perceived as linked to an executive's individual performance (as in variable pay), it's considered legitimate and may promote knowledge-sharing and cooperation among top executives. (2019-02-12)
Two windows into the brain
CHLA's Dr. Bradley Peterson uses two brain imaging techniques to study autism. (2019-01-30)
Mouse studies show 'inhibition' theory of autism wrong
Today's main hypothesis about the cause of autism symptoms is that neurons receive too little inhibition or too much excitation, causing hyperexcitability. (2019-01-21)
Stock options worth more for women, senior managers, study finds
A novel new way of determining the value of employee stock options has yielded some surprising insights: Options granted to woman and senior managers are worth more because they hold them longer. (2019-01-07)
Impairment rating of injured workers depends on the when and where of assessment
A comparison of a group of injured workers assessed using the two most recent editions of the AMA guides revealed that usage of the sixth edition resulted in significantly lower impairment ratings than the fifth edition. (2018-12-13)
New study finds employee incentives can lead to unethical behavior in the workplace
Findings suggest that setting compensation goals can increase dishonesty when managers are also paid a bonus for hitting certain targets. (2018-12-11)
Brain activity shows development of visual sensitivity in autism
Research investigating how the brain responds to visual patterns in people with autism has shown that sensory responses change between childhood and adulthood. (2018-12-11)
In times of low unemployment, nursing home quality suffers
The low unemployment rate in the US -- which fell to a 49-year low in September and October -- is good news to many people, but perhaps not to residents of nursing homes. (2018-12-07)
Tele-ERs can help strengthen rural hospitals
A new study from the University of Iowa finds rural hospitals that use tele-medicine to back up their emergency room health care providers save money and find it easier to recruit new physicians. (2018-12-03)
New research questions fish stocking obligations
Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. (2018-11-30)
Occupational health study links air pollution and cancer
University of Stirling experts have discovered new evidence of the link between air pollution and cancer as part of a new occupational health study. (2018-11-22)
Study finds hospital communication-and-resolution programs do not expand liability risk
Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated liability effects of communication-and-resolution programs. (2018-11-02)
Expanding CEO-to-worker pay gap bad for business
Companies whose CEOs earn hundreds of times their average employee's pay are viewed as less desirable to work for, and to do business with, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study. (2018-09-24)
Study: Widely used nonprofit efficiency tool doesn't work
A recent study finds that the tool most often used to assess the efficiency of nonprofit organizations isn't just inaccurate -- it is negatively correlated with efficiency. (2018-09-20)
Probiotic use may reduce antibiotic prescriptions, researchers say
The use of probiotics is linked to reduced need for antibiotic treatment in infants and children, according to a review of studies that probed the benefits of probiotics, co-led by a Georgetown investigator. (2018-09-14)
Wage gap between hospital executives and doctors is widening, study finds
Over the past decade, salaries for hospital CEOs have risen much faster than for surgeons, physicians, and nurses, reports a study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. (2018-08-14)
Societies recommend policies to retain, increase ranks of ID physician scientists
Improved compensation, expanded mentorship and training opportunities, and concrete measures to improve workforce diversity are all needed to address attrition from the ranks of physician scientists specializing in infectious diseases, and to ensure that the next generation of that work force is sufficient to bring quests for new life-saving treatments and cures to fruition, according to recommendations released today by IDSA, HIVMA and PIDS. (2018-08-14)
Scientists reduced the weight of optics for satellite observation by 100 times
IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing (IEEE) published the article of the group of scientists of Samara National Research University. (2018-08-08)
Transplantation followed by antiviral therapy cured hepatitis C
Twenty patients who received kidneys transplanted from hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected donors experienced HCV cure, good quality of life, and excellent renal function at one year. (2018-08-06)
Single-payer plan in New York could cover all without increasing spending
The New York State Assembly has passed a bill that would create a single-payer plan providing coverage to all state residents. (2018-08-01)
Plenty of habitat for bears in Europe
A new study spearheaded by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) shows that there are still many areas in Europe where bears are extinct but with suitable habitat for hosting the species. (2018-07-24)
Link found between resilience to dyslexia and gray matter in the frontal brain
A new joint Tel Aviv University and University of California San Francisco study identifies the brain mechanism that accounts for the discrepancy between low decoding skills and high reading comprehension in some children with dyslexia. (2018-07-24)
Cognitive consequences of age-related increase in brain activity
Increased frontal brain activity in healthy older adults reflects reduced efficiency rather than a way to maintain cognitive function, finds a study of two human samples published in JNeurosci. (2018-07-23)
Want an expensive engagement ring? Looks count
Men are willing to purchase more showy, expensive engagement rings when they imagine themselves with an attractive woman rather than a woman with average looks. (2018-07-10)
Some of the world's poorest people are bearing the costs of tropical forest conservation
Researchers from Bangor University in the UK and the University of Antananarivo in Madagascar show that new conservation restrictions in Madagascar bring very significant costs to local people (representing up to 85 percent of local annual incomes). (2018-07-05)
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