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Current Computed tomography News and Events

Current Computed tomography News and Events, Computed tomography News Articles.
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'Excretion of sugar into stool'? New action of anti-diabetic drug discovered
A research team led by Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine's Professor OGAWA Wataru and Project Associate Professor NOGAMI Munenobu has discovered that metformin, the most widely prescribed anti-diabetic drug, causes sugar to be excreted in the stool. (2020-06-03)
Artificial intelligence can improve how chest images are used in care of COVID-19 patients
According to a recent report by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, artificial intelligence (AI) should be used to expand the role of chest X-ray imaging -- using computed tomography, or CT -- in diagnosing and assessing coronavirus infection so that it can be more than just a means of screening for signs of COVID-19 in a patient's lungs. (2020-06-03)
New guidelines for assessment of bone density and microarchitecture in vivo with HR-pQCT
There is an urgent need for guidance and consensus on the methods for, and reporting of, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) imaging so that different studies can be compared to each other. (2020-06-02)
New technique takes 3D imaging an octave higher
A collaboration between Colorado State University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign resulted in a new, 3D imaging technique to visualize tissues and other biological samples on a microscopic scale, with potential to assist with cancer or other disease diagnoses. (2020-06-02)
Advanced X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease
The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body. (2020-05-19)
Molecular imaging offers insight into therapy outcomes for neuroendocrine tumor patients
A new proof-of-concept study published in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine has demonstrated that molecular imaging can be used for identifying early response to 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment in neuroendocrine tumor patients. (2020-05-14)
Unlocking the gate to the millisecond CT
Researchers have developed a new multi-beam method for conducting CT scans that improve image quality whilst drastically cutting the required time to one millisecond. (2020-05-14)
Cutting-edge imaging may provide insight into the functional significance of a stenosis
A novel study aims to evaluate whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) parameters may predict fractional flow reserve (FFR) values and assess if OCT parameters may predict clinical outcome in patients with negative FFR. (2020-05-14)
Patients with intermediate left main disease experience worse cardiovascular events
A new study shows that when compared with patients without intermediate left main coronary artery disease, those with intermediate left main disease have greater risk of cardiovascular events. (2020-05-14)
New imaging tool helps researchers see extent of Alzheimer's early damage
New imaging technology allows scientists to see the widespread loss of brain synapses in early stages of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that one day may help aid in drug development, according to a new Yale University study. (2020-05-13)
Scientists reveal solar system's oldest molecular fluids could hold the key to early life
Scientists from the Royal Ontario Museum have analysed a meteorite atom by atom to reveal the chemistry and acidity of the earliest fluids in the solar system. (2020-05-11)
International research improves quality of CT scan imagery
Computerized tomography (CT) is one of the most effective medical tests for analysing the effects of many illnesses, including COVID-19. (2020-05-08)
Novel radiotracer meets gold standard for imaging prostate cancer
The novel radiopharmaceutical 18F-PSMA-1007 is both effective and readily available for detecting malignant prostate cancer lesions, according to research published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-05-08)
Accurate 3D imaging of sperm cells moving at top speed could improve IVF treatments
Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers have developed a safe and accurate 3D imaging method to identify sperm cells moving at a high speed. (2020-05-07)
MRI technique could reduce need for radiation in measuring tumor response to chemotherapy
Whole body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) may aid in the assessment of cancer treatment response in children and youth at much lower levels of radiation than current approaches, suggests a small study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2020-05-05)
Societies issue guide to safely resume cardiovascular procedures, diagnostic tests
The American College of Cardiology together with other North American cardiovascular societies has issued a framework for ethically and safely reintroducing invasive cardiovascular procedures and diagnostic tests after the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-04)
Framework on how to safely resume essential cardiovascular diagnostic and treatment care during the COVID-19 pandemic, from the AHA and 14 North American cardiovascular societies
The American Heart Association, together with 14 cardiovascular societies in North America, today issued joint guidance, 'Safe Reintroduction of Cardiovascular Services during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Guidance from North American Society Leadership,' to outline a systematic, phased approach to safely reintroducing cardiovascular procedures for diagnosis and treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-04)
New self-forming membrane to protect our environment
A new class of self-forming membrane has been developed by researchers from Newcastle University, UK. (2020-05-01)
Study of nearly 10,000 women explores feasibility and safety of multi-cancer blood test
In an exploratory study of nearly 10,000 women with no history of cancer, researchers evaluating a multi-cancer blood test report that it successfully detected some cancers, including early cancers that could be localized and surgically removed. (2020-04-28)
Immune-regulating drug improves gum disease in mice
A drug that has life-extending effects on mice also reverses age-related dental problems in the animals, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2020-04-28)
New understanding of asthma medicines could improve future treatment
New research has revealed new insights into common asthma aerosol treatments to aid the drug's future improvements which could benefit hundreds of millions of global sufferers. (2020-04-27)
Artificial intelligence can categorize cancer risk of lung nodules
Computed tomography scans for people at risk for lung cancer lead to earlier diagnoses and improve survival rates, but they can also lead to overtreatment when suspicious nodules turn out to be benign. (2020-04-24)
Breakthrough in genome visualization
Kadir Dede and Dr. Enno Ohlebusch at Ulm University in Germany have devised a method for constructing pan-genome subgraphs at different granularities without having to wait hours and days on end for the software to process the entire genome. (2020-04-23)
AI to make dentists' work easier
Finnish researchers have developed a new automatized way to localise mandibular canals. (2020-04-21)
Scientists uncover major cause of resistance in solid electrolytes
Scientists investigated grain boundaries in a solid electrolyte at an unprecedentedly small scale. (2020-04-21)
New COVID-19 test quickly and accurately detects viral DNA
Millions of people have been tested for the novel coronavirus, most using a kit that relies on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). (2020-04-15)
Observing the internal 3D structure of the nipple to understand and fight breast cancer
Researchers from Nagoya University, led by Assoc. Prof. Naoki Sunaguchi, employed X-ray dark-field computed tomography to create three-dimensional renderings of the internal structure of the human nipple, thereby elucidating its varied arrangements. (2020-04-08)
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
In this Ideas and Opinions piece from the University of California, San Francisco and San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the authors discuss the findings of early studies that addressed the use of chest computed tomography for the detection of COVID-19. (2020-04-08)
Atherosclerosis progresses rapidly in healthy people from the age of 40
A CNIC study published in JACC demonstrates that atheroma plaques extend rapidly in the arteries of asymptomatic individuals aged between 40 and 50 years participating in the PESA-CNIC-Santander study. (2020-04-06)
Lucy had an ape-like brain
A new study led by paleoanthropologists Philipp Gunz and Simon Neubauer from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reveals that Lucy's species Australopithecus afarensis had an ape-like brain. (2020-04-01)
New sensors could offer early detection of lung tumors
MIT researchers have developed a urine test that can offer early detection of proteins linked to lung cancer. (2020-04-01)
Ancient hominins had small brains like apes, but longer childhoods like humans
Using precise imaging technology to scan fossil skulls, researchers found that as early as 3 million years ago, children had a long dependence on caregivers. (2020-04-01)
Two COVID-19 papers published in PLOS ONE
Two studies of the coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak recently published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2020-03-31)
Editorial calls for a precision medicine approach to follow-up of diverticulitis
An editorial challenges physicians and the US healthcare system to reconsider the current 'one size fits all' care for diverticulitis and to employ a precision medicine approach to determine which patients should be referred for colonoscopy. (2020-03-30)
High-resolution PET/CT assesses brain stem function in patients with hearing impairment
Novel, fully digital, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of small brain stem nuclei can provide clinicians with valuable information concerning the auditory pathway in patients with hearing impairment, according to a new study published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-03-25)
The Lancet: Prostate cancer study finds molecular imaging could transform management of patients with aggressive cancer
Results from a randomised controlled trial involving 300 prostate cancer patients find that a molecular imaging technique is more accurate than conventional medical imaging and recommends the scans be introduced into routine clinical practice. (2020-03-22)
AI may help predict responses to non-small cell lung cancer systemic therapies
Using standard-of-care computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), researchers utilized artificial intelligence (AI) to train algorithms to predict tumor sensitivity to three systemic cancer therapies. (2020-03-20)
Why is appendicitis not always diagnosed in the emergency department?
A new study examines the factors associated with a potentially missed diagnosis of appendicitis in children and adults in the emergency department. (2020-03-16)
How curved are your bones?
Researchers find smart bones curve to protect against fracture. (2020-03-13)
Approximating a kernel of truth
Machine learning tasks using very large data sets can be sped up significantly by estimating the kernel function that best describes the data. (2020-03-10)
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