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Does DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there?
Researchers have developed a new non-invasive method to count individual fish by measuring the concentration of environmental DNA in the water, which could be applied for quantitative monitoring of aquatic ecosystems. (2020-07-03)
Microplastic pollution accumulates heavily in coastal areas such as fjords and estuaries
Microplastic pollution in marine environments is concentrated most highly in coastal habitats, especially fjords and estuaries, according to a new review article published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin. (2020-06-30)
Quantifying the building blocks of DNA is now easier thanks to a novel technique
A highly sensitive and easy-to-use technique applicable for tissue samples can be useful, for example, to researchers specialised in mitochondrial diseases and cancer. (2020-06-24)
Extending the coverage of PM2.5 monitoring to help improve air quality
A team of researchers in China has improved the method to obtain mass concentrations of particulate matter from widely measured humidity and visibility data. (2020-06-23)
Prenatal stress associated with infant gut microbes
Mother's chronic prenatal psychological distress and elevated hair cortisol concentrations are associated with gut microbiota composition of the infant, according to a new publication from the FinnBrain research project of the University of Turku, Finland. (2020-06-23)
Study: Air pollution major risk for cardiovascular disease regardless of country income
From low-income countries to high-income countries, long-term exposure to fine particulate outdoor air pollution is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease and death, a new Oregon State University study found. (2020-06-23)
Southwestern correctional facilities' drinking water puts inmate health at risk
The first nationwide analysis of drinking water quality in United States correctional facilities found average arsenic concentrations in drinking water in Southwestern United States correctional facilities were twice as high as average arsenic concentrations in other Southwest community drinking water systems. (2020-06-22)
COVID-19 toll in nursing homes linked to staffing levels and quality
A new study shows that residents of long-term care facilities with lower nurse staffing levels, poorer quality scores, and higher concentrations of disadvantaged residents suffer from higher rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths. (2020-06-18)
Scientists call for long-term research on ozone source apportionment
More long-term research should be carried out to provide references for the development of emission reduction strategies to achieve long-term ozone attainment in China (2020-06-12)
Analysing the effects two decades after a mining spill
There has been an important fall in the total concentrations and evolution of the metal fraction towards their more innocuous forms, so the environmental risk is much reduced. (2020-06-12)
Coal-tar-sealant major source of PAH contamination in Great Lakes tributaries
Runoff from pavement with coal-tar-based sealant is the most likely primary source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, found in the majority of streambed sediments of Great Lakes tributaries, according to a new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (2020-06-11)
Something in the water: Environmental pollutant may be more hazardous than previously thought
Sometimes toxins, such as hazardous wastes and industrial byproducts, seep into groundwater, the source of our drinking water. (2020-06-05)
Something in the water: Pollutant may be more hazardous than previously thought
Perchlorate, a chemical compound used in rocket fuels and other materials, may be a more hazardous pollutant than previously thought, says a new study from Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2020-06-05)
Tiger snakes tell more about local wetlands' pollution levels
Tiger snakes living in Perth's urban wetlands are accumulating toxic heavy metals in their livers, suggesting that their habitats -- critical, local ecosystems -- are contaminated and the species may be suffering as a result. (2020-06-02)
New evidence for a blood-based biomarker for Alzheimer's disease
Neurofilament light chain (NfL) has great potential as a biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer's disease and could be also useful for monitoring treatment response for that condition. (2020-05-27)
New map reveals global scope of groundwater arsenic risk
Up to 220 million people worldwide, with approximately 94% of them in Asia, could be at risk of drinking well water containing harmful levels of arsenic, a tasteless, odorless and naturally occurring poison. (2020-05-21)
Spring rains are a surprising source of pollen
Spring rains washes away some pollen, but not all. University of Iowa researchers have found tree pollen fragments can remain airborne for hours after a storm. (2020-05-20)
Genetic tradeoffs do not stop evolution of antibiotic resistance
Bacteria can still develop antibiotic resistance even in the face of challenging genetic tradeoffs, or compromises, associated with varying antibiotic concentrations, says a new study published today in eLife. (2020-05-19)
Persistent inequitable exposure to air pollution in Salt Lake County schools
Salt Lake County, Utah's air pollution varies over the year, and at times it is the worst in the United States. (2020-05-15)
Contrasting trends of PM2.5 and surface ozone in China
In a paper published online in National Science Review, an international team of scientists led by Dr. (2020-05-13)
Field study reveals how ammonia isotope molecules diffuse in air
A new study corrects the bias of passive sampler that monitors ammonia and offers a firmer handle on characterizing ammonia sources. (2020-05-13)
Ancient rocks show high oxygen levels on Earth 2 billion years ago
Earth may have been far more oxygen-rich early in its history than previously thought, setting the stage for the evolution of complex life, according to new research by scientists at the University of Alberta and the University of Tartu in Estonia. (2020-05-12)
Men's blood contains greater concentrations of enzyme that helps COVID-19 infect cells
Evidence from a large study of several thousand patients in 11 European countries shows that men have higher concentrations of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in their blood than women. (2020-05-10)
DDT, other banned pesticides found in Detroit-area black women: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in the journal Environmental Research finds detectable levels of DDE (what DDT becomes when metabolized in the body) and other banned organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the blood of over 60 percent of a cohort of black women of reproductive age in the Detroit area, with higher levels in women who smoked cigarettes daily, drank more alcohol, and drank more water. (2020-05-06)
Seafloor currents may direct microplastics to biodiversity hotspots of the deep
Microplastic particles entering the sea surface were thought to settle to the seafloor directly below them, but now, a new study reveals that slow-moving currents near the bottom of the ocean direct the flow of plastics, creating microplastic hotpots in sediments of the deep sea. (2020-04-30)
How atrazine regulations have influenced the environment
Opposing chemical trends linked to atrazine regulations from 1990s. (2020-04-22)
High ferritin levels may indicate severe COVID-19
Professor Yehuda Shoenfeld is Head of the Laboratory of the Mosaic of Autoimmunity at St Petersburg University and founder and Head of the Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases (Israel). (2020-04-22)
Rising carbon dioxide levels will change marine habitats and fish communities
Researchers from the universities of Palermo (Italy), Tsukuba (Japan) and Plymouth (UK) showed that elevated dissolved CO2 conditions can lead to a 45% decrease of fish diversity. (2020-04-20)
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet Overreliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers from Lancaster University. (2020-04-20)
Continued CO2 emissions will impair cognition
New CU Boulder research finds that an anticipated rise in carbon dioxide concentrations in our indoor living and working spaces by the year 2100 could lead to impaired human cognition. (2020-04-20)
Nasal smear as an allergy screening test
In the world of allergy diagnostics, the familiar blood samples and unpleasant skin prick procedures for testing allergen tolerance may soon be a thing of the past. (2020-04-17)
First Gulf-wide survey of oil pollution completed 10 years after Deepwater Horizon
Since the 2010 BP oil spill, marine scientists at the University of South Florida (USF) have sampled more than 2,500 individual fish representing 91 species from 359 locations across the Gulf of Mexico and found evidence of oil exposure in all of them, including some of the most popular types of seafood. (2020-04-15)
A potential breakthrough in obesity medicine with the help of gold nanoparticles
A team of researchers in Korea believes to have discovered a synthetic gold-based compound which may help patients with obesity. (2020-04-14)
Don't look to mature forests to soak up carbon dioxide emissions
Research published today in Nature suggests mature forests are limited in their ability to absorb 'extra' carbon as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase. (2020-04-08)
Tracking Southern Hemisphere black carbon to Antarctic snow
Biomass burning represents around 80% of all BC emitted to the atmosphere in the Southern Hemisphere, which means that the fires happening in Australia, New Zealand and South America ultimately leave a mark in Antarctic snow. (2020-04-07)
Stream pollution from mountaintop mining doesn't stay put in the water
Since the 1980s, a mountaintop mine in West Virginia has been leaching selenium into nearby streams at levels deemed unsafe for aquatic life. (2020-04-06)
Study shows legal marijuana products too strong for pain relief
More than 90% of the legal marijuana products offered in medical dispensaries are much stronger than what clinical studies have shown that doctors recommend for chronic pain relief, according to a study published in the March 26 online edition of the journal PLOS ONE. (2020-03-26)
Study challenges common view of oxygen scarcity on Earth 2 billion years ago
Geologists at University of Tartu and University of Alberta in collaboration with an international research team found evidence for elevated oxygen levels 2 billion years ago, in contradiction to previously accepted models that predict low oxygen at that time. (2020-03-24)
Surprise! Ammonia emitted from fertilized paddy fields mostly doesn't end up in the air
A new study indicates that ammonia deposition in the neighborhood of sources can largely reduce the amount of emitted ammonia entering the atmosphere, and thus can reduce atmospheric ammonia pollution. (2020-03-20)
Vaping chemical creates toxic ketene gas, RCSI research
A chemical found in some vaping products can produce a highly toxic gas when heated up, according to new research from RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences. (2020-03-12)
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