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Current Conservation News and Events

Current Conservation News and Events, Conservation News Articles.
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Wilderness areas halve extinction risk
The global conservation community has been urged to adopt a specific target to protect the world's remaining wilderness areas to prevent large scale loss of at-risk species. (2019-09-18)
Undervalued wilderness areas can cut extinction risk in half
Wilderness areas, long known for intrinsic conservation value, are far more valuable for biodiversity than previously believed, and if conserved, will cut the world's extinction risk in half, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. (2019-09-18)
UM study abroad students fuel understanding of gaps in conservation data
A new collaborative study between students from University of Montana and the Universidad de Concepcion in Chile seeks to understand the type and magnitude of gaps in scientific information as a way to improve conservation planning. (2019-09-17)
Victorian hog deer genetics revealed
Australian researchers looking for a genetic lifeline to endangered hog deer species endemic to Pakistan, northern India and mainland southeast Asia have found widespread hybridisation of the species in Victoria. (2019-09-16)
Conserving rare species for the maintenance of Mediterranean forests
This study has shown the importance of conserving rare species for the maintenance of complex ecosystems like Mediterranean forests. (2019-09-11)
Digital records of preserved plants and animals change how scientists explore the world
There's a whole world behind the scenes at natural history museums that most people never see -- millions upon millions of dinosaur bones, pickled sharks, dried leaves, and every other part of the natural world.These specimens are used in research by scientists trying to understand how different kinds of life evolved and how we can protect them. (2019-09-11)
Threatened species habitat destruction shows federal laws are broken
Human activities have destroyed more than 7.7 million hectares of threatened species habitat, revealing critical failures with Australia's federal environmental protection laws. (2019-09-09)
Not all meat is created equal: How diet changes can sustain world's food production
David Vaccari, an environmental engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, has created a model that predicts how several different conservation approaches could reduce demand for a nonrenewable resource that is absolutely vital for feeding the world: phosphorus. (2019-09-06)
Artificial intelligence used to recognize primate faces in the wild
Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed new artificial intelligence software to recognize and track the faces of individual chimpanzees in the wild. (2019-09-04)
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat
New research has found that habitat loss is a major concern for hundreds of Australian bird species, and south-eastern Australia has been the worst affected. (2019-09-02)
AI uncovers new details about Old Master paintings
Artificial intelligence can be used to analyse high-resolution digital X-ray images of paintings, providing more insight for conservators and those restoring classic works of art. (2019-08-30)
What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?
Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the USA have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. (2019-08-30)
New UN high-seas treaty must close gaps in biodiversity governance
Thousands of marine species could be at risk if a new United Nations high-seas biodiversity treaty, now being negotiated in New York, does not include measures to address the management of all fish species in waters beyond national jurisdiction, not just commercial species, warns an analysis by a Duke University-led team of American, Dutch, Swiss and French researchers. (2019-08-29)
Isotopes in poop show where secretive jaguars hunt
To track secretive jaguars in the forested mountains of Belize, the University of Cincinnati turned to geology and poop. (2019-08-28)
Land-use program fosters white-tailed deer populations in USA
A land-use program piloted in the United States is having a long-term positive impact on populations of white-tailed deer, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-08-27)
Satellite-based estimates of reduced deforestation in protected areas needed
In the context of progressing towards new targets for a post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, the debate remains on whether the emphasis should be on protected area coverage or protected area effectiveness. (2019-08-27)
New study: Migrating mule deer don't need directions
Mule deer navigate in spring and fall mostly by using their knowledge of past migration routes and seasonal ranges. (2019-08-23)
Poo transplants to help save koalas
Poo transplants are helping expand koala microbiomes, allowing the marsupials to eat a wider range of eucalypts and possibly survive habitat loss. (2019-08-20)
African elephants demonstrate movements that vary in response to ecological change
Wild African elephants show markedly different movements and reactions to the same risks and resources, according to a new study from Colorado State University and Save the Elephants. (2019-08-20)
Helping threatened coho salmon could generate hundreds of millions in non-market economic benefits
A new study provides evidence that increasing the abundance of a threatened or endangered species can deliver large benefits to the citizens of the Pacific Northwest. (2019-08-14)
Research bias may leave some primates at risk
Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University. (2019-08-14)
Coca and conflict: the factors fuelling Colombian deforestation
Deforestation in Colombia has been linked to armed conflict and forests' proximity to coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived. (2019-08-13)
Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife
Researchers conducted camera trap surveys within Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and five surrounding remnant forest fragments, finding 28 mammal species in the protected forest and 21 in the fragments -- including critically endangered species such as Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), along with species of conservation concern such as marbled cat (Pardofelis marmorata) and Asiatic golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii). (2019-08-08)
88% decline of big freshwater animals
Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: from 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88% -- twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean. (2019-08-08)
Calcium: Good for bones, good for cultural conservation
When it comes to cultural heritage sites, there are few things historians wouldn't do to preserve them for future generations. (2019-08-07)
Human activity likely affects giraffe's social networks
In a new Ethology study, researchers examined information on two adjacent giraffe populations in Kenya to determine whether human activities and high predation affect their social networks. (2019-08-07)
A hog in wolf's clothing
Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. (2019-08-06)
New Zealand's biodiversity will take millions of years to recover
The arrival of humans in New Zealand, some 700 years ago, triggered a wave of extinction among native bird species. (2019-08-05)
New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps
New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species. (2019-08-02)
Study suggests economic growth benefits wildlife but growing human populations do not
Analysis shows that while national-level economic growth and social development -- including more women in government -- are associated with more abundant wildlife, growing human populations are linked to wildlife decline. (2019-08-02)
Repairing harmful effects of inbreeding could save the iconic Helmeted Honeyeater
Study combines over 30 years of demanding fieldwork and advanced genetics to quantify how much harm is done by inbreeding in the last wild population of the Helmeted Honeyeater, and identifies ways forward. (2019-08-01)
Citizen scientists offer ray of hope
Volunteer snorkelers and scuba divers have been helping capture images of reef manta rays to better protect the threatened species. (2019-07-31)
Overturning the truth on conservation tillage
Conservation tillage does not lower yield in modern cropping systems. (2019-07-31)
Biodiversity highest on Indigenous-managed lands
More than one million plant and animal species worldwide are facing extinction, according to a recent United Nations report. (2019-07-31)
Conservation or construction? Deciding waterbird hotspots
MSU scientists show that conservation and construction decisions should rely on multiple approaches to determine waterbird 'hotspots,' not just on one analysis method as is often done. (2019-07-30)
To conserve water, Indian farmers fire up air pollution
A measure to conserve groundwater in northwestern India has led to unexpected consequences: added air pollution in an area already beset by haze and smog. (2019-07-30)
Increasing value of ivory poses major threat to elephant populations
The global price of ivory increased tenfold since its 1989 trade ban by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), new research has found. (2019-07-29)
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)
Little genes, big conservation: UM scientists study genetic rescue
A new paper by University of Montana scientists examines the potential and uncertainties of attempting genetic rescue, a conservation approach that involves moving a small number of individual animals from one population to another to reduce genetic problems and decrease extinction risk. (2019-07-17)
Pokémon-like card game can help teach ecology: UBC research
Playing a Pokémon-like card game about ecology and biodiversity can result in broader knowledge of species and a better understanding of ecosystems than traditional teaching methods, like slideshows, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-07-17)
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