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Current Conservation News and Events

Current Conservation News and Events, Conservation News Articles.
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A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked
On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology. (2019-11-20)
Endangered whales react to environmental changes
Some 'canaries' are 50 feet long, weigh 70 tons, and are nowhere near a coal mine. (2019-11-19)
The little duck that could: Study finds endangered Hawaiian duck endures
New research has found that the genetic diversity of the koloa is high, and conservation efforts on the island of Kauai have been successful. (2019-11-18)
Saving 'half Earth' for nature would affect over a billion people
Plans to save biodiversity must take into account the social impacts of conservation if they are to succeed, say University of Cambridge researchers. (2019-11-18)
Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land. (2019-11-18)
Get over it? When it comes to recycled water, consumers won't
If people are educated on recycled water, they may come to agree it's perfectly safe and tastes as good -- or better -- than their drinking water. (2019-11-18)
What vision do we have for the deep sea?
The ocean hosts an inconceivable wealth of marine life, most of which remains unknown. (2019-11-14)
Stanford researchers explore how citizens can become agents of environmental change
Some programs work better than others when it comes to involving citizens in preserving the environment. (2019-11-14)
Whale shark hot spot offers new conservation insights
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the USA, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency in the Red Sea, offering insights for conservation. (2019-11-12)
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. (2019-11-12)
Putting a conservation finger on the internet's pulse
Social media is a rich vein of data for researchers to discover important trends in human environmental behaviour. (2019-11-11)
Found: Miniature fanged 'deer' rediscovered tiptoeing through Vietnam's coastal forests
Global Wildlife Conservation and partners Southern Institute of Ecology and Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research have rediscovered a species lost to science since 1990 called a silver-backed chevrotain -- a deer-like species that is the size of a rabbit, has a silver sheen, and has been hanging on in a region of Vietnam ravaged by poaching by snares. (2019-11-11)
Conservation scientists call for reverse to biodiversity loss
A group of international conservationists is urging governments across the globe to adopt a new approach to address the impact of economic development on the natural world. (2019-11-08)
Study finds sex bias in bird conservation plans
After pairing up and raising chicks, males and females of some bird species spend their winter break apart. (2019-11-07)
To save biodiversity, scientists suggest 'mega-conservation'
While the conservation of charismatic creatures like pandas, elephants and snow leopards are important in their own right, there may be no better ecological bang-for-our-buck than a sound, science-based effort to save widespread keystone systems. (2019-11-05)
Global policy-makers must take a more ambitious approach to reversing biodiversity loss
Leading conservationists urge governments to adopt a new approach to address the impact of economic development on the natural world. (2019-11-04)
Detection dogs and DNA on the trail of endangered lizards
Detection dogs trained to sniff out the scat of an endangered lizard in California's San Joaquin Valley, combined with genetic species identification, could represent a new noninvasive sampling technique for lizard conservation worldwide. (2019-10-30)
In Southeast Asia, illegal hunting is a more threat to wildlife than forest degradation
A new study carried out by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in cooperation with the World Wide Fund for Nature Vietnam (WWF-Vietnam) and the Sabah Forestry Department of the Government of Malaysia suggests that for ground dwelling mammal and bird communities, illegal hunting using indiscriminate snares may be a more immediate threat than forest degradation through selective logging. (2019-10-30)
Land restoration in Ethiopia pays off but climate change necessitates many strategies
In the last decade, Ethiopia has invested more than US$1.2 billion annually in restoring landscapes in several regions of the country. (2019-10-30)
Carbon bomb: Study says climate impact from loss of intact tropical forests grossly underreported
A new study in the journal Science Advances says that carbon impacts from the loss of intact tropical forests has been grossly underreported. (2019-10-30)
Intact forest loss 'six times worse' for climate
The impact of losing intact tropical forests is more devastating on the climate than previously thought, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2019-10-30)
Viable alternatives to trophy hunting exist, say scientists
A recent letter in Science cited a lack of alternatives to trophy hunting. (2019-10-28)
Extent of human encroachment into world's protected areas revealed
Largest study yet to compare protected with 'matched' unprotected land finds 'significantly higher' increases in human pressure -- primarily through agriculture -- in protected areas across the tropics. (2019-10-28)
Scientists identify British butterflies most threatened by climate change
Many British butterflies and moths have been responding to warmer temperatures by emerging earlier in the year and for the first time scientists have identified why this is creating winners and losers among species. (2019-10-24)
The benefits that carnivorous animals bring to society are under-studied
For a period of 17 years, the scientific studies conducted around the world on the relationships between humans and carnivores focused excessively on the conflicts between them, overlooking the benefits that carnivores bring to society. (2019-10-24)
No place like home: Species are on the move, but many have nowhere to go
Since the 1970s, insects in the warmer half of Britain have been flying, hopping and crawling northwards at an average rate of around five metres per day. (2019-10-21)
GenBank can be trusted
Smithsonian scientists and colleagues working to identify coral reef organisms analyzed more than 4.7 million animal DNA sequences from GenBank, the most commonly used tool used to identify environmental DNA, and discovered that animal identification errors are surprisingly rare--but sometimes very funny. (2019-10-21)
New deep-water coral discovered
A new octocoral species was recently discovered in a biodiversity hotspot and World Heritage Site in Pacific Panama. (2019-10-21)
The composition of species is changing in ecosystems across the globe
While the identities of species in local assemblages are undergoing significant changes, their average number is relatively constant. (2019-10-17)
Making conservation 'contagious'
New research reveals conservation initiatives often spread like disease, a fact which can help scientists and policymakers design programs more likely to be taken up. (2019-10-15)
Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds
New research from Point Blue Conservation Science shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. (2019-10-10)
Capturing elephants from the wild hinders their reproduction for over a decade
Capturing elephants to keep in captivity not only hinders their reproduction immediately, but also has a negative effect on their calves, according to new research. (2019-10-09)
Helping conservation initiatives turn contagious
New research shows that conservation initiatives go viral, which helps scientists and policymakers better design successful programs more likely to be adopted. (2019-10-09)
Study explores how to make conservation initiatives more contagious
New research shows conservation initiatives often spread like diseases, helping scientists and policymakers design programmes more likely to be taken up. (2019-10-07)
Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals
Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming temperatures, a study by scientists at Duke University and Fudan University suggests. (2019-10-07)
Besides hot water, coral bleaching also about location, location, location
The WCS-led study revealed a more complex view than current standard predictions of coral bleaching events caused primarily by heat stress; rather, the scientists found that bleaching is driven by a variety of stressors, and each region responds differently. (2019-10-02)
The hidden ark: How a grassroots initiative can help save fish from extinction
Freshwater fish are the most threatened vertebrate group, and species are disappearing faster than scientists can describe them. (2019-10-01)
The dark giraffe, the new dark horse
Darker male giraffes have been found to be more solitary and less social than their lighter-coloured counterparts, according to new research from The University of Queensland. (2019-09-26)
Scientists connected fragments of pine savanna and new species keep showing up
By connecting small, restored patches of savanna to one another via habitat corridors at an experimental landscape within the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, a nearly 20-year-long study has shown an annual increase in the number of plant species within fragments over time, and a drop in the number of species disappearing from them entirely. (2019-09-26)
Habitat connectivity increases plant diversity over decades
Restoring habitat connectivity may be a powerful tool in restoring lost plant biodiversity in fragmented ecosystems, a new study suggests. (2019-09-26)
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