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Current Conservation News and Events

Current Conservation News and Events, Conservation News Articles.
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Conservation efforts for giant south american river turtles have protected 147,000 females
By analyzing records in countries of the Amazon and Orinoco basins--which include Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador -- a paper published today in Oryx -- The International Journal of Conservation, categorized 85 past and present initiatives or projects that work to preserve the South American River Turtle, or charapa (Podocnemis expansa), a critically endangered species. (2019-06-25)
Cities are key to saving monarch butterflies
Monarch butterflies are at risk of disappearing from most of the US, and to save them, we need to plant milkweed for them to lay their eggs on. (2019-06-21)
Study reveals key locations for declining songbird
Many of North America's migratory songbirds are declining at alarming rates. (2019-06-19)
Lynx in Turkey: Noninvasive sample collection provides insights into genetic diversity
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) collected data and samples (feces, hair) from the Caucasian Lynx (Lynx lynx dinniki), in a region of Anatolian Turkey over several years. (2019-06-17)
Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees
Study concludes that the sexual selection hypothesis was the main reason for the high rates of infanticide among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda. (2019-06-13)
Understanding social structure is important to rewilding
Increasing the success of wildlife translocations is critical, given the escalating global threats to wildlife. (2019-06-13)
Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink
Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems. (2019-06-07)
Study reveals potential new disease threats for wild snow leopards
The first study to investigate disease threats to wild snow leopards has detected that exposure to infections may pose a threat to this highly vulnerable species, as well as local people and their livestock. (2019-06-06)
Talking to each other -- how forest conservation can succeed
Forest conservation can be a source of tension between competing priorities and interests from forestry, science, administration and nature conservation organizations. (2019-06-06)
Elasmobranches getting slammed
Researchers analyzed four years of catch data from Tanjung Luar -- a fishing village specifically targeting sharks -- to identify catch abundance and seasonality of vulnerable or endangered species, and found that catch per unit effort (CPUE) of sharks and rays from 2014 to 2017 fluctuated but was not significantly different. (2019-06-06)
Understanding Amazonia's mysterious ocelots
Researchers conducted a 12-year study from 2010 to 2017 on ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in the Brazilian Amazon, deploying 899 camera traps at 12 stations to determine habitat preferences, which were largely unknown. (2019-06-06)
Working landscapes can support diverse bird species
Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-06-05)
Analysis: World's protected areas safeguard only a fraction of wildlife
A new analysis published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment shows that the world's protected areas (PAs) are experiencing major shortfalls in staffing and resources and are therefore failing on a massive scale to safeguard wildlife. (2019-06-05)
Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks
Frogs need elephants. That's what a new WCS-led study says that looked at the role of water-filled elephant tracks in providing predator-free breeding grounds and pathways connecting frog populations. (2019-06-04)
An island haven for frogs in a sea of extinctions
New Guinea is one of the only places in the world where frogs are safe from the chytrid fungus that has made more than 90 species extinct. (2019-06-03)
Study: Underrepresented faculty play an uneven role in advancing diversity and inclusion
A team of researchers at Colorado State surveyed faculty members from ecology and evolutionary biology programs at universities across the United States and found that while most respondents reported engaging in diversity and inclusion activities, those who participated in these activities at the highest levels were more likely to identify themselves as non-white, non-male or the first generation in their family to attend college. (2019-06-03)
Better conservation through satellites
The use of satellite telemetry in conservation is entering a 'golden age,' and is now being used to track the movements of individual animals at unprecedented scales. (2019-05-31)
How protected areas are losing ground in the United States and Amazonia
Once champions of global conservation, the United States and Brazil are now leading a troubling global trend of large-scale rollbacks in environmental policy, putting hundreds of protected areas at risk, a new study suggests. (2019-05-30)
Climate driving new right whale movement
New research connects recent changes in the movement of North Atlantic right whales to decreased food availability and rising temperatures in Gulf of Maine's deep waters. (2019-05-29)
Threatened beetles benefit from forest thinning
Wood-living beetles that use oak trees are a species-rich and threatened animal group in modern forestry and agriculture in southern Sweden. (2019-05-28)
Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)
Social media data reveal benefits or threats to biodiversity by visitors to nature locations
Social media data reveal global patterns of visitation rates, attractiveness and pressure to more than 12,000 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs). (2019-05-23)
Wolf-dog 'swarms' threaten Europe's wolves
'Swarms' of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe's wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research. (2019-05-23)
First comprehensive network of wild crop species will help breeders tackle food insecurity
The first comprehensive network of sites where crop wild relatives are found has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2019-05-23)
Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity
With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. (2019-05-23)
Ecologists find bush dog, native of South America, in remote central Costa Rica
Wildlife ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who are studying different conservation practices in the forests of Costa Rica recently made a startling discovery on a wildlife camera trap -- wild bush dogs documented farther north than ever before and at the highest elevation. (2019-05-23)
New approach for determining conservation threat for species with little data
University of British Columbia researchers have found a new way to identify which marine species are threatened and what is threatening them, even if these species lack data. (2019-05-22)
The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities
A group of UK and Peruvian researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon. (2019-05-21)
The return of the wolves
Researchers examine global strategies for dealing with predators. (2019-05-20)
Size is everything
The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. (2019-05-20)
Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants
Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with World Endangered Species Day. (2019-05-17)
Changes in subsistence hunting threaten local food security
Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests -- the mainstay of local people as a source of protein and a direct connection to these ecosystems -- is in jeopardy from a variety of factors. (2019-05-17)
Research brief: Protecting rare species can benefit human life
Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. (2019-05-16)
Meet the tenrecs
Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec -- a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar. (2019-05-16)
Species may disappear faster than anticipated, according to new data models
A new study in Journal of Applied Ecology equips scientists to more accurately predict whether, and when, a species will go extinct by being more realistic about how long it takes populations to establish each new generation. (2019-05-16)
Producing food whilst preserving biodiversity
In nature conservation and agriculture, there are two opposing views of how to combine high biodiversity and sustainable food production: nature conservation should either be integrated into agricultural land, or segregated into protected areas in order to enable maximum yields in the food production areas. (2019-05-14)
Species facing climate change could find help in odd place: Urban environments
Research shows that animals move faster through 'low quality' habitats (fulfilling a minimum of resources for survival) -- evidence that could change the way conservationists think about managing urban landscapes to help species move in response to climate change. (2019-05-14)
Wild red deer contribute to the preservation of open landscapes
Similar to farm animals such as cattle or sheep, wild red deer grazing in open landscapes can also contribute to the conservation of protected habitats. (2019-05-09)
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study. (2019-05-09)
Researchers document the oldest known trees in eastern North America
A stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest wetland tree species in the world. (2019-05-09)
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