Nav: Home

Current Cooperation News and Events

Current Cooperation News and Events, Cooperation News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 21 | 816 Results
Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine
If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine. (2020-08-03)
How does cooperation evolve?
In nature, organisms often support each other in order to gain an advantage. (2020-07-23)
Stellar fireworks celebrate birth of giant cluster
Astronomers created a stunning new image showing celestial fireworks in star cluster G286.21+0.17. (2020-07-02)
Is not helping a bad person good or bad?
A research team led by Hitoshi Yamamoto from Rissho University has analyzed how the social norm of indirect reciprocity is adopted in human society and revealed results that contradicted previous theoretical predictions. (2020-07-01)
Simulating cooperation in local communities
In new research published in EPJ B, a new simulation-based approach is introduced which could help to reduce the proportion of people who misuse welfare payoffs, through a cost-effective system which rewards individuals who use them responsibly. (2020-06-18)
Vegetarians are slimmer and less extroverted than meat eaters
The less animal products someone consumes, the lower his body mass index on average and the less he tends to be extroverted. (2020-06-15)
Protecting the neuronal architecture
Protecting nerve cells from losing their characteristic extensions, the dendrites, can reduce brain damage after a stroke. (2020-06-05)
Innocent and highly oxidizing
Freiburg chemists produce new oxidants as a tool for preparative chemistry (2020-06-03)
In chimpanzees, females contribute to the protection of the territory
Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, extensively studied several neighboring groups of western chimpanzees and their findings reveal that females and even the entire group may play a more important role in between-group competition than previously thought. (2020-05-27)
Gaps in international law impede pandemic research
The global COVID-19 pandemic reveals gaps in international law that can inhibit the sharing of scientific information, biological samples and genetic sequence data (GSD) crucial to the timely development of diagnostics, antiviral treatments and vaccines to address novel viral threats. (2020-05-14)
On the road to non-toxic and stable perovskite solar cells
The promising halide perovskite materials for solar energy conversion show high efficiencies, but this comes at a cost: The best perovskite materials incorporate toxic lead which poses a hazard to the environment. (2020-05-11)
Cultivating cooperation through kinship
Extensive cooperation among biologically unrelated individuals is uniquely human. It would be surprising if this uniqueness were not related to other uniquely human characteristics, yet current theories of human cooperation tend to ignore the human aspects of human behavior. (2020-04-30)
New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. (2020-04-21)
Study: Cultural variables play important role in perceptions of status, power
Cultural variables play an important role in perceptions of status and power in business, according to research co-written by Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. (2020-04-16)
International borders continue to hinder cross-border cooperation
Cross-border regions have great potential for cooperation, yet very few border regions are integrated, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-03-31)
Rats give more generously in response to the smell of hunger
How do animals that help their brethren manage to prioritize those most in need? (2020-03-24)
As farming developed, so did cooperation -- and violence
The growth of agriculture led to unprecedented cooperation in human societies, a team of researchers, has found, but it also led to a spike in violence, an insight that offers lessons for the present. (2020-03-04)
Systems analysis for a new Arctic
A major new IIASA report highlights new and emerging policy trends in the Arctic, a region on the front lines of climate change, geopolitics, and global governance. (2020-02-17)
Feedback culture: When colleagues become competitors
Competitive behavior among employees may be triggered by the type of feedback they have received. (2020-02-15)
Is human cooperativity an outcome of competition between cultural groups?
A study by ASU researchers looks at how culture may have fueled our capacity to cooperate with strangers. (2020-02-04)
Cooperation after eye contact: Gender matters
Researchers from the UB published an article in the journal Scientific Reports which analyses, through the prisoner's dilemma game, the willingness of people to cooperate when in pairs. (2020-01-30)
New study shows why women have to be likeable, and men don't
A new study in The Economic Journal finds that likeability is an influencing factor in interactions between women, as well as interactions between men and women, but not in all-male interactions. (2020-01-28)
How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it
First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired». (2020-01-27)
To reverse engineer dynamics of microbial communities, researchers construct their own
Scientific and public appreciation for microbes -- and the key role their communal actions play in environmental health, food production, and human wellness -- has grown in recent years. (2020-01-21)
Prosocial and tolerant parrots help others to obtain food
African grey parrots spontaneously help conspecifics without obvious benefits to themselves. (2020-01-09)
Study examines the benefits of childbirth education classes during pregnancy
Participating in childbirth classes may help women have normal vaginal deliveries, according to a study published in the International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics. (2020-01-08)
Dogs and wolves are both good at cooperating
A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. (2020-01-06)
Less offspring due to territorial conflicts
Territorial conflicts can turn violent in humans and chimpanzees, two extremely territorial species. (2020-01-03)
Radical treatment of chronic oral infection before stem cell transplantation not necessary
A recently published study indicates that oral infections seem to have no association with the risk of stem cell transplantation patients dying of or getting a serious infection within six months of the procedure. (2020-01-03)
Close friends help macaques survive
Close friendships improve the survival chances of rhesus macaques, new research shows. (2019-12-10)
Living at the edges
The clustering of protected habitats in the Americas near international borders makes many iconic, wide-ranging animals physically dependent on good relations between neighboring countries and wildlife-friendly borders. (2019-12-04)
Monkeys inform group members about threats -- following principles of cooperation
Humans are often faced with the choice of investing in the greater good or being selfish and letting others do the work. (2019-12-02)
Human-machine interactions: Bots are more successful if they impersonate humans
Study examines humans' willingness to cooperate with bots (2019-11-14)
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. (2019-11-12)
New research suggests robots appear more persuasive when pretending to be human
Recent technological breakthroughs in artificial intelligence have made it possible for machines, or bots, to pass as humans. (2019-11-12)
Army researcher promotes cooperation between humans, autonomous machines
The trust between humans and autonomous machines is a top priority for Army researchers -- as machines become integral to society, it is critical to understand the impact on human decision-making. (2019-11-12)
How Human Population came from our ability to cooperate
Humans' ability to cooperate during child-bearing years by sharing food, labor, and childcare duties is the story of population growth. (2019-11-06)
Chromosomal aberrations created during in vitro fertilization do not endanger future baby
The process of in vitro fertilization (IVF) is often unsuccessful due to chromosomal changes that occur in an embryo fertilized in a test tube. (2019-11-05)
Lend me a flipper
Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. (2019-10-28)
Prisoner's dilemma game reveals cooperation leads to leadership
Game theory has historically studied cooperation and hierarchy, and has sought to explain why individuals cooperate, even though they might be better off not to do so. (2019-10-23)
Page 1 of 21 | 816 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.