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Current Copper News and Events

Current Copper News and Events, Copper News Articles.
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Early hunter-gatherers interacted much sooner than previously believed
A nearly 4,000-year-old burial site found off the coast of Georgia hints at ties between hunter-gatherers on opposite sides of North America, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-10-07)
Why some greens turn brown in historical paintings 
Enticed by the brilliant green hues of copper acetate and copper resinate, some painters in the Renaissance period incorporated these pigments into their masterpieces. (2019-10-02)
Inventing the world's strongest silver
A team of scientists has made the strongest silver ever--42 percent stronger than the previous world record. (2019-10-02)
Silicon technology boost with graphene and 2D materials
In a review published in Nature, ICFO researchers and collaborators report on the current state, challenges, opportunities of graphene and 2D material integration in Silicon technology. (2019-09-30)
Converting CO2 to valuable resources with the help of nanoparticles
An international research team has used nanoparticles to convert carbon dioxide into valuable raw materials. (2019-09-27)
Harmful metals found in vapors from tank-style electronic cigarettes
A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found the concentration of metals in electronic cigarette aerosols -- or vapor -- has increased since tank-style electronic cigarettes were introduced in 2013. (2019-09-27)
Scientists finally find superconductivity in place they have been looking for decades
SLAC/Stanford scientists prove a well-known model of material behavior applies to high-temperature superconductors, giving them a new tool for understanding how these materials conduct electricity with no loss. (2019-09-26)
Missing electrons reveal the true face of a new copper-based catalyst
A collaboration between researchers from Cornell, Harvard, Stanford and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has resulted in a reactive copper-nitrene catalyst that pries apart carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds and transforms them into carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bonds, which are a crucial building block for chemical synthesis, especially in pharmaceutical manufacturing. (2019-09-24)
Cracking the ethylene code
Separating pure ethylene from ethane is a difficult and costly process, but one that new research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering is poised to streamline. (2019-09-23)
Tel Aviv University researchers discover evidence of biblical kingdom in Arava Desert
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence of the biblical kingdom of Edom that flourished in the Arava Desert in today's Israel and Jordan during the 12th-11th centuries BCE. (2019-09-18)
New method for detecting quantum states of electrons
Researchers in the Quantum Dynamics Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) devised a new method -- called image charge detection -- to detect electrons' transitions to quantum states. (2019-09-17)
The enigma of bronze age tin
The origin of the tin used in the Bronze Age has long been one of the greatest enigmas in archaeological research. (2019-09-13)
Big game hunting for a more versatile catalyst
For the first time, researchers at Harvard University and Cornell University have discovered exactly how a reactive copper-nitrene catalyst works, a finding that could revolutionize how chemical industries produce everything from pharmaceuticals to household goods. (2019-09-12)
Plastics, fuels and chemical feedstocks from CO2? They're working on it
Four SUNCAT scientists describe recent research results related to the quest to capture CO2 from the smokestacks of factories and power plants and use renewable energy to turn it into industrial feedstocks and fuels. (2019-09-09)
Secret messages hidden in light-sensitive polymers
Scientists from the CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université have recently shown how valuable light-sensitive macromolecules are: when exposed to the right wavelength of light, they can be transformed so as to change, erase or decode the molecular message that they contain. (2019-09-04)
Poor diet can lead to blindness
An extreme case of 'fussy' or 'picky' eating caused a young patient's blindness, according to a new case report published today [2 Sep 2019] in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-09-02)
First report of superconductivity in a nickel oxide material
Scientists at SLAC and Stanford have made the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity - the ability to transmit electrical current with no loss. (2019-08-28)
Breaking up is hard to do
Physicists used to think that superconductivity -- electricity flowing without resistance or loss -- was an all or nothing phenomenon. (2019-08-21)
DGIST succeeded in materials synthesis for high efficiency in biological reaction
DGIST Professor Jaeheung Cho in the Department of Emerging Materials Science secured materials that lead aldehyde deformylation reaction. (2019-08-19)
Skoltech scientists found a way to create long-life fast-charging batteries
A group of researchers led by Skoltech Professor Pavel Troshin studied coordination polymers, a class of compounds with scarcely explored applications in metal-ion batteries, and demonstrated their possible future use in energy storage devices with a high charging/discharging rate and stability. (2019-08-15)
Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics
An innovative way to pattern metals has been discovered by scientists in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick, which could make the next generation of solar panels more sustainable and cheaper. (2019-08-14)
From greenhouse gas to fuel
University of Delaware scientists are part of an international team of researchers that has revealed a new approach to convert carbon dioxide gas into valuable chemicals and fuels. (2019-08-01)
A novel graphene-matrix-assisted stabilization method will help unique 2D materials to become a part
Scientists from Russia and Japan found a way of stabilizing two-dimensional copper oxide (CuO) materials by using graphene. (2019-08-01)
Could the heat of the Earth's crust become the ultimate energy source?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Sanoh Industrial developed a very stable battery cell that can directly convert heat into electricity, thus finally providing a way for exploiting geothermal energy in a sustainable way. (2019-07-17)
High-performance sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide
Researchers presented a new strategy for extending sodium ion batteries' cyclability using copper sulfide as the electrode material. (2019-07-15)
Producing graphene from carbon dioxide
The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. (2019-07-08)
Bionic catalysts to produce clean energy
A biohybrid material that combines reduced graphene oxide with bacterial cells offers an eco-friendly option to help store renewable energy. (2019-07-02)
Graphenes now go monolayer and single crystalline
IBS-CMCM scientists have reported a truly single layer (i.e., adlayer-free) large area graphene film on large area copper foils. (2019-07-02)
Copper compound shows further potential as therapy for slowing ALS
A compound with potential as a treatment for ALS has gained further promise in a new study that showed it improved the condition of mice whose motor neurons had been damaged by an environmental toxin known to cause features of ALS. (2019-07-01)
Utrafast magnetism: Electron-phonon interactions examined at BESSY II
How fast can a magnet switch its orientation and what are the microscopic mechanisms at play ? (2019-06-28)
New cuprate superconductor may challenge the classical wisdom
Superconductivity is one of the most mysterious phenomena in nature in that the materials can conduct electrical current without any resistance. (2019-06-27)
Bleach-induced transformation for humidity-durable air filters
A molecule-trapping material that normally degrades in water remains stable after two years of humidity exposure when treated with a common skin bleach. (2019-06-26)
Levänluhta jewellery links Finland to a European exchange network
A recently completed study indicates that the material of the jewellery found together with human remains at the Levänluhta water burial site originates in southern Europe, contrary to what researchers had previously thought. (2019-06-25)
Study finds micronutrient deficiencies common at time of celiac disease diagnosis
Micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins B12 and D, as well as folate, iron, zinc and copper, are common in adults at the time of diagnosis with celiac disease. (2019-06-24)
Electron (or 'hole') pairs may survive effort to kill superconductivity
Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in 'stripe-ordered' cuprates -- copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism -- discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. (2019-06-14)
The Lancet: First randomised trial finds no substantial difference in risk of acquiring HIV for three different forms of contraception
A randomised trial of more than 7,800 African women found that a type of contraceptive injection (intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate -- DMPA-IM) posed no substantially increased risk of HIV acquisition when compared with a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant. (2019-06-13)
BU researchers develop new metamaterial that can improve MRI quality and reduce scan time
New magnetic metamaterial could be used as an additive technology to increase the imaging power of lower-strength MRI machines, increasing the number of patients seen by clinics and decreasing associated costs, without any of the risks that come with using higher-strength magnetic fields. (2019-06-10)
Antennas of flexible nanotube films an alternative for electronics
Metal-free antennas made of thin, strong, flexible carbon nanotube films are as efficient as common copper antennas, according to Rice University researchers. (2019-06-10)
One-two-punch catalysts trapping CO2 for cleaner fuels
DGIST researchers are getting closer to developing a material that delivers a one-two punch: recycling atmospheric carbon dioxide for the production of cleaner hydrocarbon fuels. (2019-06-07)
Toxic metals found in reproductive organs of critically endangered eels
European eels consume their own skeletons as they swim 6,000 kilometers to their spawning grounds. (2019-06-06)
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