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Current Corruption News and Events

Current Corruption News and Events, Corruption News Articles.
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Why relying on new technology won't save the planet
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet Overreliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers from Lancaster University. (2020-04-20)
Mismanagment, not tampering, at root of supply problems for Ugandan farmers
For years, speculation about the poor quality of vital agricultural supplies in the African nation of Uganda has focused on questions of deliberate tampering with products -- adding rocks to bags of seed in order to charge more money for the heavier product, for instance. (2020-04-17)
Corporate social irresponsibility: Which cases are critically reported -- and which aren't?
A new study on media reports about corporate misconduct in five countries shows that reporting or no reporting often depends on interests of the media companies. (2020-03-12)
UTSA examines reporters' portrayal of US border under Trump
The southern US border has been portrayed as a bogeyman not only by the Trump administration but also surprisingly by major US news media. (2020-02-12)
Beyond Goodfellas and The Godfather: the Cosa Nostra families' rise and fall
Since 1979 the Crime and Justice series has presented a review of the latest international research, providing expertise to enhance the work of sociologists, psychologists, criminal lawyers, justice scholars, and political scientists. (2020-02-06)
Researchers foresee the ongoing use of cash
Are the countries of the Eurozone ready to drop cash in hand? (2020-01-28)
Global dissatisfaction with democracy at record high, new report reveals
2019 had the 'highest level of democratic discontent' since detailed global recording began in 1995. (2020-01-28)
All Bitcoin mining should be environmentally friendly
The energy used to mine for cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin is on par with the energy consumed by Ireland. (2019-12-10)
Government integrity holds key to tackling corporate corruption -- study
Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals. (2019-11-20)
Study shows digital media has damaging impact on reintegration of 'white collar' criminals
Offenders convicted of occupational crime and corruption are having their rehabilitation negatively affected by long term 'labels' attached to them on digital media, according to new research by the University of Portsmouth. (2019-11-15)
When reporting climate-driven human migration, place matters
Location matters when talking about how climate might or might not be driving migration from Central America. (2019-11-13)
Overcoming weak governance will take decades with implications for climate adaptation
Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-10-28)
Improving governance is key for adaptive capacity
Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability. (2019-10-28)
Catch-22 -- stricter border enforcement may increase agent corruption
Analysis of corruption cases among customs officers and Border Patrol agents reveals alarming trends depending on their years of service. (2019-10-02)
Corruption among India's factory inspectors makes labour regulation costly
New research shows that 'extortionary' corruption on the part of factory inspectors in India is helping to drive up the cost of the country's labour regulations to business. (2019-08-27)
Bribery linked with difficulty accessing healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa
In a large survey in sub-Saharan Africa, adults who said they had paid a bribe for healthcare in the past year were more than four times as likely to report difficulty in obtaining care than those who had not paid bribes. (2019-08-21)
The front line of environmental violence
Environmental defenders on the front line of natural resource conflict are being killed at an alarming rate, according to a University of Queensland study. (2019-08-05)
Study: Even in competitive markets, shareholders bear burden of corruption
While the US traditionally ranks low on worldwide corruption indices, domestic political corruption still imposes substantial costs on US shareholders, according to new research co-written by Gies College of Business accounting professor Nerissa Brown. (2019-07-18)
Current pledges to phase out coal power are critically insufficient to slow climate change
The Powering Past Coal Alliance, or PPCA, is a coalition of 30 countries and 22 cities and states, that aims to phase out unabated coal power. (2019-07-01)
Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia. (2019-06-24)
Moral concerns override desire to profit from finding a lost wallet
The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program 'What Would You Do?' -- minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end. (2019-06-20)
Social media use contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia, research finds
Social media use is contributing to poor mental health in Indonesia, research presented in a paper by Sujarwoto Sujarwoto, Gindo Tampubolon and Adi Cilik Pierewan has found. (2019-06-17)
Why you may be prone to hiring a liar, and not even know it
Researchers find that people don't always disapprove of deception. In fact, they perceive the ability to deceive as an asset in occupations that are stereotyped as high in 'selling orientation.' (2019-06-11)
Exploring the causes of persistent corruption
IIASA researchers used a novel approach to explore the key processes and conditions that determine corruption levels. (2019-06-10)
Study offers comprehensive roadmap for regulating political activity by nonprofits
Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer's comprehensive approach yields surprising and controversial solutions, beginning with the creation of a simple and broad definition of political activity that charities will be prohibited from engaging in. (2019-06-05)
Africa's elephant poaching rates in decline, but iconic animal still under threat
Elephant poaching rates in Africa have started to decline after reaching a peak in 2011, an international team of scientists have concluded. (2019-05-28)
Factors associated with elephant poaching
Study associates illegal hunting rates in Africa with levels of poverty, corruption and ivory demand. (2019-05-28)
Brain activity of Spanish Popular Party voters triggered by rivals
Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR), the Distance Learning University of Madrid (UDIMA) and Temple University (United States) have analyzed the brain response of supporters of Spain's Popular Party (PP) and the Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) when exposed to information about corruption or positive news from the rival party (2019-05-16)
Domestic policy driven by intergovernmental bodies not citizens, research finds
Citizens are increasingly being marginalized by intergovernmental organizations for the attention of national politicians and influence over domestic policies, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-05-13)
Bots exploiting blockchains for profit
Like high-frequency traders on Wall Street, a growing army of bots exploit inefficiencies in decentralized exchanges, which are places where users buy, sell or trade cryptocurrency independent of a central authority, a new study found. (2019-04-30)
The last chance for Madagascar's biodiversity
A group of scientists from Madagascar, UK, Australia, USA and Finland have recommended actions the government of Madagascar's recently elected president, Andry Rajoelina should take to turn around the precipitous decline of biodiversity and help put Madagascar on a trajectory towards sustainable growth. (2019-04-29)
Corruption contagion: How legal and finance firms are at greater risk of corruption
Companies with fewer levels of management such as legal, accountancy and investment banking firms could be up to five times more susceptible to corruption than similar sized organizations with a taller structure such as those in manufacturing, a new study by the University of Sussex and Imperial College has revealed. (2019-04-24)
'NarcoLogic' computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction
Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate. (2019-04-02)
Reports of corruption increase in Nigeria after film and text campaign
A star-studded Nigerian movie about corruption -- and a subsequent text-messaging campaign to combat government graft -- led a record number of citizens in Nigeria to report acts of corruption, according to a study in the journal Science Advances. (2019-03-13)
Special effects: How a movie could reduce corruption
A film and texting campaign can increase anticorruption reports from citizens, study shows. (2019-03-13)
What makes people willing to sacrifice their own self-interest for another person?
Researchers show that people are more willing to sacrifice for a collaborator than for someone working just as hard but working independently. (2019-03-05)
Political corruption scars young voters forever, new research finds
New research by Bocconi University, Milan, finds that political corruption has a long-term scarring effect on trust in democratic institutions and on voters' behavior and that such an effect differs according to one's age cohort, with first-time voters at the time of corruption revelation still being affected 25 years later. (2019-02-22)
How a telenovela was adapted for US audiences: With more sex, violence and alcohol
Given the increasing depiction of sex, violence and alcohol use in US media over recent decades, researchers sought to learn if such a 'culture of corruption' would influence an American adaptation of a TV show that originated as Spanish-language telenovela. (2019-02-07)
Future changes in human well-being to depend more on social factors than economic factors
The changes in the perception of personal well-being that could take place in the next three decades, on a global level, depend much more on social factors than on economic ones. (2019-01-28)
Evolution of national policy determines the degree of Spanish citizens' trust in the EU
Since 2008, political trust in European institutions has greatly deteriorated in many member states, including Spain, and has given rise to increasing research into its causes. (2019-01-22)
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