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Current Cotton News and Events, Cotton News Articles.
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New device quickly detects lithium ions in blood of bipolar disorder patients
A group of Hokkaido University researchers has developed a paper-based device that can easily and cheaply measure lithium ion concentration in blood, which could greatly help bipolar disorder patients. (2020-05-20)
The best material for homemade face masks may be a combination of two fabrics
In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people wear masks in public. (2020-04-24)
New AI model accurately classifies colorectal polyps using slides from 24 institutions
Researchers at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have trained a deep neural network to distinguish the four major types of colorectal polyps excised during screening colonoscopy. (2020-04-23)
Researchers discover a key to the survival of dormant breast cancer cells
Trying to understand why dormant breast cancer cells survive despite being starved of estrogen to prevent growth, researchers from Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center found that breakdown of fat to produce energy supports cancer cell survival. (2020-04-22)
HudsonAlpha plant genomics researchers surprised by cotton genome
Plant genomics researchers at HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology announce the surprising results of a cotton sequencing study led by Jane Grimwood, Ph.D., and Jeremy Schmutz, who co-direct the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center (HGSC). (2020-04-21)
Picking up threads of cotton genomics
In Nature Genetics, a multi-institutional team including researchers at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has now sequenced and assembled the genomes of the five major cotton lineages. (2020-04-20)
Odor experts uncover the smelly chemistry of lemur love
Three chemicals with floral, fruity scents are likely essential ingredients in the natural cologne male ring-tailed lemurs use to attract a mate. (2020-04-16)
Study shows European coins have antimicrobial activity in contrast to banknotes
Research due to be presented at this year's European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that European banknotes are more easily contaminated by microbes than coins. (2020-04-16)
Hair surface engineering to be advanced by nano vehicles
'Hair surface engineering: modification of fibrous materials of biological origin using functional ceramic nano containers', a project headed by Rawil Fakhrullin, is supported by the Russian Science Foundation. (2020-04-10)
Neither surgical nor cotton masks effectively filter SARS COV-2
Both surgical and cotton masks were found to be ineffective for preventing the dissemination of SARS-CoV-2 from the coughs of patients with COVID-19. (2020-04-06)
Fungi found in cotton can decrease root knot nematode galling
Gregory Sword and colleagues at Texas A&M University inoculated cotton seeds with a diverse array of fungal isolates and tested the resulting seedlings in greenhouse trials for susceptibility to gall formation by root knot nematodes. (2020-04-06)
Why does your cotton towel get stiff after natural drying?
The remaining 'bound water' on cotton surfaces cross-link single fibers of cotton, causing hardening after natural drying, according to a new study conducted by Kao Corporation and Hokkaido University. (2020-03-27)
DNA riddle unravelled: How cells access data from 'genetic cotton reels'
With so much genetic information packed in such a tiny space, how cells access DNA when it needs it is something of a mystery. (2020-03-26)
Pesticide seed coatings are widespread but underreported
Seed-coated pesticides -- such as neonicotinoids, many of which are highly toxic to both pest and beneficial insects -- are increasingly used in the major field crops, but are underreported, in part, because farmers often do not know what pesticides are on their seeds, according to an international team of researchers. (2020-03-17)
Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India
In India, Bt cotton is the most widely planted cotton crop by acreage, and it is hugely controversial. (2020-03-13)
Rural Hondurans embrace cancer screening opportunities
Few people in low-income countries have access to cancer screening and their cancer rates are on the rise. (2020-03-11)
BAT study shows new vaping technology significantly reduces exposure to toxicants
A vapor product that contains new-to-world technology has significantly fewer and lower levels of certain toxicants compared to cigarette smoke, a study has shown. (2020-03-03)
What if mysterious 'cotton candy' planets actually sport rings?
Some of the extremely low-density, 'cotton candy like' exoplanets called super-puffs may actually have rings, according to new research published in The Astronomical Journal by Carnegie's Anthony Piro and Caltech's Shreyas Vissapragada. (2020-03-02)
A little good is good enough -- excuses and 'indulgence effects' in consumption
Ecofriendly materials, produced under good work conditions -- convincing arguments for most of us. (2020-02-21)
Exposing a virus's hiding place reveals new potential vaccine
By figuring out how a common virus hides from the immune system, scientists have identified a potential vaccine to prevent sometimes deadly respiratory infections in humans. (2020-02-03)
Researchers capture first images of oxygen in cancer tumors during radiation therapy
Oxygen in cancer tumors is a known major factor in the success of radiation therapy, but currently there are no good ways to monitor tumor oxygenation during this treatment. (2020-01-29)
Researchers investigate molecule, VISTA, which keeps immune system quiet against cancer
Researchers led by Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center are studying a valuable target in regulating the immune response in cancer and autoimmunity. (2020-01-16)
Clothes last longer and shed fewer microfibers in quicker, cooler washing cycles
First research into impact of wash cycle times shows that shorter, cooler washes: help clothes keep their color and last longer, when compared to warmer, longer cycles; release significantly fewer microfibers into wastewater; significantly reduce color transfer, a major cause of lights and whites becoming duller. (2020-01-14)
New mechanism may safely prevent and reverse obesity
Researchers at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have discovered that a receptor found in almost all cells plays a big role in the body's metabolism. (2020-01-13)
Scientists capture for first time, light flashes from human eye during radiotherapy
People have long reported seeing flashes of light during brain radiotherapy. (2020-01-07)
Benefits of integrating cover crop with broiler litter in no-till dryland cotton systems
Although most cotton is grown in floodplain soils in the Mississippi Delta region, a large amount of cotton is also grown under no-till systems on upland soils that are vulnerable to erosion and have reduced organic matter. (2020-01-06)
Grower citizen science project uses collaboration to improve soil health
The Grower Citizen Science Project is a collaboration between soil scientists and growers in the southern High Plains of Texas. (2020-01-06)
Scientists learn what women know -- and don't know -- about breast density and cancer risk
A new study by scientists at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice conducted focus groups with women in three different states to learn what they did and did not know about breast density, in general and their own. (2019-12-23)
Breast cancer cells swallow a 'free lunch' of dietary fat particles from the bloodstream
A research team at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center has previously shown that fatty particles from the bloodstream may boost the growth of breast cancer cells. (2019-12-12)
For controlling tsetse flies, fabric color matters
This week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, researchers report that they have engineered an improved colored fabric for the insecticide-treated targets used to control tsetse, based on an understanding of how flies see color. (2019-12-12)
T-shirt generates electricity from temperature difference between body and surroundings
Researchers of the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have designed a low-cost T-shirt that generates electricity from the temperature difference between the human body and the surroundings. (2019-11-22)
Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land. (2019-11-18)
The smell of old books could help preserve them
Old books give off a complex mélange of odors, ranging from pleasant (almonds, caramel and chocolate) to nasty (formaldehyde, old clothes and trash). (2019-11-13)
A new machine learning approach detects esophageal cancer better than current methods
Dartmouth scientists have proposed a new machine learning model for identification of esophageal cancer that could open new avenues for applying deep learning to digital pathology. (2019-11-06)
Subgroups of breast and ovarian cancers exhibit the same unique drug sensitivity
Although cancers are commonly classified and named by site of origin, and effective drugs are FDA-approved accordingly, a research team at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center has found that multiple organ sites share some of the same genetic features associated with vulnerability to drug therapies. (2019-10-24)
Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States
Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. (2019-10-17)
First report of cotton blue disease in the United States
Reported from six counties in coastal Alabama in 2017, cotton blue disease affected approximately 25% of the state's cotton crop and caused a 4% yield loss. (2019-10-17)
Ingestible sensor allows patients to be independent but still supported during TB treatment
Ingestible sensor enables patients to take tuberculosis drugs independently and receive timely support from medical staff. (2019-10-04)
A new, natural wax coating that makes garments water-resistant and breathable
Aalto University researchers have made a non-toxic coating solution with wax obtained from Brazilian palm tree leaves. (2019-09-30)
The next agricultural revolution is here
By using modern gene-editing technologies to learn key insights about past agricultural revolutions, two plant scientists are suggesting that the next agricultural revolution could be at hand. (2019-09-19)
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