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Current Crab News and Events, Crab News Articles.
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Scientists detect crab nebula using innovative gamma-ray telescope
The prototype Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope (SCT)--developed by scientists at the Columbia University in collaboration with researchers from other institutions--is part of an international effort, known as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), which aims to construct the world's largest and most powerful gamma-ray observatory, with more than 100 similar telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres. (2020-06-02)
Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-05-14)
The North Atlantic right whale population is in poor condition
New research reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in poorer body condition than individual whales from the three well recovering populations of Southern right whales. (2020-04-27)
North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer condition than Southern right whales
New research by an international team of scientists reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer body condition than their counterparts in the southern hemisphere. (2020-04-23)
Animals keep viruses in the sea in balance
A variety of sea animals can take up virus particles while filtering seawater for oxygen and food. (2020-03-27)
Science publishes study on Neanderthals as pioneers in marine resource exploitation
The journal Science has published a study led by the University of Barcelona, which presents the results of the excavation in Cueva de Figueira Brava, Portugal, which was used as shelter by Neanderthal populations about between 86,000 and 106,000 years ago. (2020-03-26)
Building a better color vision test for animals
University of Cincinnati biologists modified simple electronics to create a color vision test for fiddler crabs and other animals. (2020-03-19)
Ship noise leaves crabs too stressed to hide from danger
The ocean is getting too loud even for crabs. Normally, shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) can slowly change their shell color to blend in with the rocky shore, but recent findings show that prolonged exposure to the sounds of ships weakens their camouflaging powers and leaves them more open to attack. (2020-03-09)
Ship noise hampers crab camouflage
Colour-changing crabs struggle to camouflage themselves when exposed to noise from ships, new research shows. (2020-03-09)
West coast dungeness crab stable or increasing even with intensive harvest, research shows
Fishermen from California to Washington caught almost all the available legal-size male Dungeness crab each year in the last few decades. (2020-03-06)
Cuttlefish eat less for lunch when they know there'll be shrimp for dinner
Cuttlefish can rapidly learn from experience and adapt their eating behavior accordingly, a new study has shown. (2020-02-04)
Crab-shell and seaweed compounds spin into yarns for sustainable and functional materials
Biobased fibres are made from two renewable marine resources and with promise in advanced applications, in wovens and medical materials, among others. (2020-01-28)
Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements
Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves -- warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems -- and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. (2020-01-27)
'Blob' research shows ecological effects that halted fishing and hiked whale entanglements
An ecological pileup of unprecedented changes in the ocean off the West Coast beginning about 2014 led to record entanglements of humpback and other whales, putting the region's most valuable commercial fishery at risk, new research shows. (2020-01-27)
Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, PSU study finds
Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study. (2020-01-17)
The carbon footprint of dinner: How 'green' are fish sticks?
Fish sticks may be a tasty option for dinner, but are they good for the planet? (2020-01-16)
Jaguars could prevent a not-so-great American biotic exchange
In eastern Panama, canid species from North and South America are occurring together for the first time. (2020-01-06)
Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons
A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. (2019-12-06)
Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years
The extinct sea scorpion species Jaekelopterus rhenaniae had eyes comparable to those of today's horseshoe crabs. (2019-12-03)
Ecofriendly nano-fabrication achieved with biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles
The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) succeeded in creating glass with self-cleaning and antireflective functions through the biodegradable chitosan nanoparticle coating. (2019-11-28)
Tiny fossils, big findings: UAlberta paleontologists discover odd mid-Cretaceous shrimp
One of the most incomplete fossil records of marine life is being filled in by a new find by a team of paleontologists from the University of Alberta, Yale University, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute -- with the discovery of hundreds of tiny comma shrimp fossils. (2019-11-28)
Study measures impact of agriculture on diet of wild mammals
In an article published in PNAS, Brazilian researchers stress the need for agricultural management that favors the maintenance of wildlife. (2019-11-18)
Crab disease poses threat to shellfish stocks
Shore crabs carry parasites that pose a major threat to shellfish stocks. (2019-10-30)
Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. (2019-10-15)
Response rate to albumin-bound paclitaxel plus gemcitabine plus cisplatin treatment among patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: A phase 1b/2 pilot clinical trial
Published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Oncology, researchers at HonorHealth Research Institute and TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope, found that among a clinical trial of 25 patients, adding the drug cisplatin to a current standard-of-care drug regimen resulted in substantial tumor shrinkage for 71 percent of those patients, and dramatically increased survival beyond one year. (2019-10-03)
Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
An amazing trove of 150 million-year-old coral reef fossils from eastern Austria -- at the time a shallow sea -- provides a snapshot of a diverse and thriving community of creatures, including 53 species of squat lobsters. (2019-09-18)
Astrophysicists link brightening of pulsar wind nebula to pulsar spin-down rate transition
Astrophysicists have discovered that the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) surrounding the famous pulsar B0540-69 brightened gradually after the pulsar experienced a sudden spin-down rate transition (SRT). (2019-08-26)
Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. (2019-08-21)
Warmer winters could lead to longer blue crab season in Chesapeake Bay
Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are predicting that warmer winters in the Chesapeake Bay will likely lead to longer and more productive seasons for Maryland's favorite summer crustacean, the blue crab. (2019-07-31)
Limits on pot fishing can result in win-win for fishermen and marine wildlife
The first major study into the impact of inshore potting for crab and lobster within a Marine Protected Area has found that in areas of low potting intensity the industry is operating in a way that had little impact on seabed species or economically-important shellfish. (2019-07-16)
The highest energy gamma rays discovered by the Tibet ASgamma experiment
The Tibet ASgamma experiment, a China-Japan joint research project, has discovered the highest energy cosmic gamma rays ever observed from an astrophysical source - in this case, the 'Crab Nebula.' The experiment detected gamma rays ranging from > 100 Teraelectron volts (TeV) to an estimated 450 TeV. (2019-07-03)
Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement
Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study published in The Biological Bulletin. (2019-06-20)
Chimps caught crabbing
Kyoto University researchers report on chimpanzees in Guinea fishing and consuming freshwater crabs, something previously undiscovered. (2019-05-29)
Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs
Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. (2019-05-29)
Crabs' camouflage tricks revealed
Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows. (2019-05-24)
Fooling nerve cells into acting normal
In a new study, scientists at the University of Missouri have discovered that a neuron's own electrical signal, or voltage, can indicate whether the neuron is functioning normally. (2019-05-09)
Low oxygen levels could temporarily blind marine invertebrates
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego have found that low oxygen levels in seawater could blind some marine invertebrates. (2019-05-08)
This hawk likes crab for dinner
This is the first report of a red-shouldered hawk attacking and presumably consuming any species of crab and the first report of probable ghost crab predation by a raptor in North America. (2019-05-02)
Biomimicry of basic instinct
Chemical engineers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering have recreated collaboration and competition responses within a microchamber environment of microscopic particles, sheets, and catalysts, effectively mimicking responses of feeding, fighting, and fleeing. (2019-04-25)
Meet Callichimaera perplexa, the platypus of crabs
The crab family just got a bunch of new cousins -- including a 95-million-year-old chimera species that will force scientists to rethink the definition of a crab. (2019-04-24)
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