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Current Creativity News and Events

Current Creativity News and Events, Creativity News Articles.
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Scientists discover what happens in our brains when we make educated guesses
Researchers have identified how cells in our brains work together to join up memories of separate experiences, allowing us to make educated guesses in everyday life. (2020-09-17)
University of Louisville immunologist summarizes functions of protein family for scientific community
Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) serve as a type of chaperone, coordinating the transport of fatty acids and other molecules between cells. (2020-08-20)
Dream on
Daydreaming can be a significant asset to employees in a workplace, depending upon certain attributes of the wanderer -- specifically, if they identify with their profession or organization. (2020-07-13)
Quantifying creativity to expand it? Better art begins with better understanding
Do different painting materials affect the creation of children's paintings? (2020-06-22)
How exposure to negative feedback in influences goal-directed consumer behaviors
Threats to self-esteem and negative feedback are pervasive in today's society. (2020-05-26)
Aha! + Aaaah: Creative insight triggers a neural reward signal
A new neuroimaging study from Drexel University's Creativity Research Lab points to an answer of what may have driven the evolutionary development of creativity. (2020-04-09)
Where in the brain does creativity come from? Evidence from jazz musicians
A new brain-imaging study out of Drexel University's Creativity Research Lab studied the brain activity of jazz guitarists during improvisation to show that creativity is, in fact, driven primarily by the right hemisphere in musicians who are comparatively inexperienced at improvisation. (2020-03-31)
The placebo effect and psychedelic drugs: tripping on nothing?
A new study from McGill suggests that, in the right context, some people may experience psychedelic-like effects from placebos alone. (2020-03-30)
Caffeine boosts problem-solving ability but not creativity, study indicates
Want to boost creativity? Caffeine may not be the way to go according to a news study by U of A psychologist Darya Zabelina. (2020-03-05)
Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education. (2020-02-24)
What is the best way to encourage innovation? Competitive pay may be the answer
Economists and business leaders agree that innovation is a major force behind economic growth, but many disagree on what is the best way to encourage workers to produce the 'think-outside-of-the-box' ideas that create newer and better products and services. (2020-02-12)
Transformative 3D printing approach established from insight into developmental biology
Engineers need to get more creative in their approach to design and additive manufacturing (AM) systems, by taking inspiration from the way humans grow and develop, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-01-10)
There is no 'I' in team -- or is there?
There is no 'I' in 'team -- as the saying goes. (2019-12-17)
The songwriter is creative -- the singer, not so much
Country music songwriters must perform a careful dance when they work with famous singers who may be less talented at writing songs but bring the needed star power to attract fans -- and, importantly, to get the song recorded in the first place, research suggests. (2019-12-11)
Walking changes vision
When people walk around, they process visual information differently than at rest: the peripheral visual field shows enhanced processing. (2019-11-20)
Study questions video games' effects on violent behavior
A new Contemporary Economic Policy study finds that there is not enough information to support the claim that violent video games lead to acts of violence. (2019-11-06)
Can the design of a building improve the creative output of its occupants?
A study published in Creativity Research Journal found creativity increased in an architecture and engineering firm's employees after moving into a building designed according to Maharishi Vastu® architecture. (2019-10-18)
Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature
Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and 'allowed to cry,' researchers say. (2019-10-10)
Kindness is a top priority in a long-term partner according to a new international study
One of the top qualities that we look for in a long-term partner is kindness, according to new research by Swansea University. (2019-09-19)
Paper: As an act of self-disclosure, workplace creativity can be risky business
It's increasingly common for managers to instruct employees to 'be creative' during brainstorming sessions. (2019-09-04)
In product design, imagining end user's feelings leads to more original outcomes
In new product design, connecting with an end user's heart, rather than their head, can lead to more original and creative outcomes, says published research co-written by Ravi Mehta, a professor of business administration at Illinois and an expert in product development and marketing. (2019-08-15)
Positive effect of music and dance on dementia proven by New Zealand study
Stereotypically viewed as passive and immobile, a University of Otago, New Zealand, pilot study has shown the powerful influence music and dance can have on older adults with dementia. (2019-08-07)
Rutgers collaborates with WHO to more accurately describe mental health disorders
A Rutgers University researcher collaborated with the World Health Organization on the first study to seek input from people with common mental health issues on how their disorders are described in diagnostic guidelines. (2019-07-16)
Science of microdosing psychedelics remains patchy and anecdotal, say researchers
The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence, say scientists. (2019-07-15)
Human pregnancy dependent on cells evolved in platypus-like animal 300 million years ago
Platelet cells, which prevent mammals from bleeding non-stop, first evolved around 300 million years ago in an egg-laying animal similar to the modern duck-billed platypus, finds joint research by UCL and Yale University. (2019-07-09)
Want to boost creativity? Try playing Minecraft
Video games that foster creative freedom can increase creativity under certain conditions, according to new research from Iowa State University. (2019-07-08)
Beyond Queen's stomp-stomp-clap: Concerts and computer science converge in new research
How to get large numbers of people engaged in participating during a live performance like a concert -- or a lecture -- and channel that energy for a sustained time period. (2019-06-14)
Visible public health leadership needed to boost vaccine coverage
Public health expert Professor John Ashton is calling for local directors of public health to provide visible leadership to address the recent systematic deterioration of vaccine coverage levels. (2019-06-05)
Public health leaders call for new efforts to promote vaccination acceptance
On Thursday, an international coalition of public health leaders including CUNY SPH Dean Ayman El-Mohandes and Senior Scholar Scott Ratzan issued a statement asserting its commitment to vaccine acceptance around the world and to eliminating vaccine-preventable diseases, including childhood diseases such as measles, mumps, and rubella. (2019-05-30)
The power of empathy in product development
'Subtle things, such as imagining how someone else would feel, can have a huge impact on creativity in general,' says UConn's Kelly Herd. (2019-05-28)
Did Leonardo da Vinci have ADHD?
Leonardo da Vinci produced some of the world's most iconic art, but historical accounts show that he struggled to complete his works. (2019-05-23)
Why creative experts may be better at imagining the future
Humans use imagination a lot, whether it be thinking about what's for dinner later tonight or trying to imagine what someone else on the other side of the world may be experiencing after reading the news. (2019-05-08)
Stanford researchers' artificial synapse is fast, efficient and durable
A battery-like device could act as an artificial synapse within computing systems intended to imitate the brain's efficiency and ability to learn. (2019-05-03)
Creativity is not just for the young, study finds
If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story. (2019-04-26)
Listeners immerse themselves in audiobooks in very different ways
In the future, a new brain research method could be used to study creativity. (2019-04-12)
To keep the creative juices flowing, employees should be receptive to criticism
Though most firms today embrace a culture of criticism, when supervisors and peers dispense negative feedback it can actually stunt the creative process, according to a new study co-authored by Yeun Joon Kim, a Ph.D. student at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. (2019-04-04)
Counselors may find that focusing on the human-nature connection may help clients
The concept of 'ecowellness' encompasses a sense of appreciation, respect, and awe of nature that can contribute to holistic wellness. (2019-04-03)
To stoke creativity, crank out ideas and then step away
There is an effective formula for unlocking employees' creative potential, according to new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin and the Gies College of Business at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (2019-03-21)
How listening to music 'significantly impairs' creativity
The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the opposite effect. (2019-02-27)
Pop art and comics -- imitation, confrontation, collaboration
The relationship between pop artist Roy Lichtenstein and the creators of comics was famously fraught, with accusations of imitation and idea-stealing from the 'strip men.' However, new research published in the journal Art History reveals a more complex and collaborative dynamic of mutual admiration. (2019-02-05)
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